Late September 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello folks, back from Summer holidays ? En route for the late September 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites’ selection.

Doug Poindexter

June 1954, exactly 18. A newcomer with his first recording. DOUG POINDEXTER came from Vendale, Arkansas. Several months ago, as he had went to Memphis, he had been noticed by a guitar player, Scotty Moore – surely the name rings a bell – and hired as front guitar man of his group, the Starlight Wranglers. His voice was very nasal, without doubt as imitation of his idol Hank Williams. On this day, he cut two sides, whose I retain « Now She Cares No More» under the producer Sam Phillips, hence Sun 202.

The record, albeit reviewed by the famous Cash Box magazine, went nowhere, and Poindexter earned his life later as a successful insurance man. « Now She Cares… » is pure hillbilly bop heaven. Fiddle and steel to the fore, and heavy bass (Bill Black). Less than 2 weeks later Black and Moore backed young Elvis. The rest is history.

Bobby Wayne

From the Washington State in 1963, here’s the very Johnny Cash styled BOBBY WAYNE. « Big Train » first on Jerden 709. During the flipside, « The Valley », the guitarist even adopts Luther Perkins (Cash’ guitarist) licks. Good vocal on both sides, and discrete chorus.

In the December 2016 fortnight I came with Californian Western swing artist EDDIE DEAN and his « Rock’n’Roll Cowboy » on Sage from 1957. Here is a quieter thing (Sage 188) : « Impatient Blues » as its name doesn’t imply is a bluesy thing, nice steel and a bit of crooning.

Eddie And Chuck

« The Louisiana Ramblers », EDDIE AND CHUCK came in 1954 with a bouncing thing, « Boogie The Blues » on the Chicago Chance label (# 3012). Weird and savage steel, great vocal and solid bass. How they were acquainted with an otherwise Blues/jazz label (1100 serie with already known artists like Wllie Nix – ex- Sun Records, or J.B. Hutto) is open to conjecture.

These sides were not unknown to Stan Lewis, owner of KWKH in Shreveport, La., who also acted as talent scout for Northern companies : Dale Hawkins and Sonny Boy Williamson came from his stable of artists and were recruited by Chess/Checker.Chance had apparently a 3000-C&W serie, but I never ever heard of any more record than this in this serie.

Dottie Jones & Winston O’Neal

A real male/female duet now with DOTTIE JONES & WINSTON O’NEAL. A fast bopper , « I’ll Be Yours » has a prominent guitar – the solo comes a la Carl Perkins ! To be found on TNT 134 (San Antonio, Texas).

From unknown source, I picked up on YouTube a nice slice of fast Hillbilly bop wih « Me And My Fiddle » by BENNY MARTIN, apparently in 1954-55. Martin cut records on Pioneer, Mercury and M-G-M. One one side he was backed with  »Hilllous Butrum & his Tennessee Partners », ex-bass player for Hank Williams, and was of rural Tennessee extraction. Nevertheless a very fine Hillbilly bopper.

Cliff Waldon & his Westernaires

Not owning Boppin’ Hillbilly vol. 15, I can’t say nothing about CLIFF WALDON & His Westernaires. His « My Baby Doll », issued on Mark 107, has an agile fiddle (+ solo), a great steel, even a bass solo. Vocal is OK for this fast Bopper.

Cash Box Aug. 31, 1957

CashBox June 25, 1955

Is there any need of presenting the MADDOX BROS. & ROSE ? I chose two tracks from their mostly creative period (Columbia, 1952 onwards). « No More Time » is a fast opus, which is still near to their Four Star product. « I’ve Got Four Big Brothers (To Look After Me ) » has Rose on lead vocal, with funny lyrics, in a true Rockabilly : Columbia 21405 from June 1955.

Sources : YouTube for Benny Martin ; W. Agenant’s Columbia 20000 serie » for the Maddox tracks ; Eddie & Chuck from various good compilations ; Bobby Wayne from 45cat. Starlite Wranglers image from “706 Union Avenue” site. My own archives.S

Early September 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

For early September fornight’s favorites, Very different things this time, from 1947 to 1961.

Al Rogers With his Rocky Mountain Boys

Al Rogers and his “The Hydrogen Bomb” do come from June 1947. Rogers was a native from Pennsylvania (later on WKPA radio). During WWII, he entertained the troops in the Pacific. Later he relocated in Amarillo, Texas. From 1946 onwards, he was back on WJAS in Pittsburg, Pa.

For early September fornight’s favorites, Very different things this time, from 1947 to 1961.

June 1954, exactly 18. A newcomer with his first recording. DOUG PONDEXTER came from Vendale, Arkansas. Several months ago, as he had went to Memphis, he had been noticed by a guitar player, Scotty Moore – surely the name rings a bell – and hired as front guitar man of his group, the Starlight Wranglers. His voice was very nasal, without doubt as imitation of his idol Hank Williams. On this day, he cut two sides, whose I retain « Now She Cares No More For Me » under the producer Sam Phillips, hence Sun 202. The record, albeit reviewed by the famous Cash Box magazine, went nowhere, and Poindexter earned his life later as a successful insurance man. « Now She Cares… » is pure hillbilly bop heaven. Fiddle and steel to the fore, and heavy bass (Bill Black). Less than 2 weeks later Black and Moore backed young Elvis. The rest is history.

Doug Poindexter with the Starlight Wranglers

Bobby Wayne

From the Washington State in 1963, here’s the very Johnny Cash styled BOBBY WAYNE. « Big Train » first on Jerden 709. During the flipside, « The Valley », the guitarist even adopts Luther Perkins’ (Cash guitarist) licks. Good vocal on both sides, and discrete chorus.

In the December 2016 fortnight I came with Californian Western swing artist EDDIE DEAN and his « Rock’n’Roll Cowboy » on Sage from 1957. Here is a quieter thing (Sage 188) : « Impatient Blues » as its name doesn’t imply is a bluesy thing, nice steel and a bit of crooning.

Cash Box March 3, 1955

Eddie & Chuck, the Louisiana Ramblers

« The Louisiana Ramblers », EDDIE AND CHUCK came in 1954 with a bouncing thing, « Boogie The Blues » on the Chicago Chance label (# 3012). Weird and savage steel, great vocal and solid bass. How they were acquainted with an otherwise Blues/jazz label (1100 serie with already known artists like Wllie Nix – ex- Sun Records, or J.B. Hutto) is open to conjecture. May I put forward this ? These sides were not unknown to Stan Lewis, owner of KWKH in Shreveport, La., who also acted as talent scout for Northern companies : Dale Hawkins and Sonny Boy Williamson came from his stable of artists and were recruited by Chess/Checker.Chance had apparently a 3000-C&W serie, but I never ever heard of any more record than this in this serie.

Cash Box, Feb. 15, 1954

A real male/female duet now with DOTTIE JONES & WINSTON O’NEAL. A fast bopper , « I’ll Be Yours » has a prominent guitar – the solo comes a la Carl Perkins ! To be found on TNT 134 (San Antonio, Texas).

From an unknown source, I picked up on YouTube a nice slice of fast Hillbilly bop wih « Just Me And My Fiddle » by BENNY MARTIN, apparently in 1954-55 on Pioneer 630. Martin cut records on Pioneer, Mercury and M-G-M. On one side he was backed with  »Hilllous Butrum & his Tennessee Partners », ex-bass player for Hank Williams, and was of rural Tennessee extraction. Nevertheless a very fine Hillbilly bopper.

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TONY DOUGLAS was released in 1958 on the very first D label records (# 1205, issued June 1958). « Baby, When The Sun Goes Down » is typical of mid-fifties Houston Hillbilly bop : solid steel, fine piano and guitar, and great vocal. Douglas had several other tracks on D, before switching in 1961 to « United artists »), more than 40 records between 1958 and 1965.A good seller.

Maddox bros. & Rose>/h2>

That’s it, folks. Sources: 45cat and 78worlds as usual for label scans. Several tunes do come from YouTube. My own archives, too.

Late February 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! It’s the second fortnight of February 2019, and there are already in this blog 5 issues since January 1st, that of two bopping fortnight’s favorites selections, and two throroughly researched hillbilly profiles, that first of the North Carolina Church Brothers and second of the harmonica extraordinaire Lonnie Glosson. Now we embark for the late February bopping selection. Latch on, folks !

Lacy Kirk

A very fast 1961 Hillbilly rocker bt LACY KIRK, « This Is Saturday Night » – guitar played on the bass chords, too short steel-guitar and fiddle solos. Singer in a good voice. This record was released on Ohio Karl 3022, a label of Clay Eager bopping is now actively researching on (see « I’m Looking For » section) . The man had many good records to his credit, and maybe you can help to share your knowledge of him with me and all the readers of the blog. « This Is Saturday Night » will cost you $ 270 if you can locate a copy in good shape.

Carson Willis

CARSON WILLIS is rightly interesting for more than one reason. He hailed from South Carolina it seems, and released the fast Hillbilly rocker « Sal’s House # 1 and # 2 as talking songs on Dixie (another of this name) # 121 (duet with Goldie Norris) complete with animals’ yells. Actually it was a reworking of « Going Down To Sal’s House » issued on the Starday custom Dixie # 903 in September 1959 under the name BILL WILLIS.

The flipside « Poor Man » is similar in style.

Bill /Harmon R. Willis

And Willis (if he’s really the same man) was to publish in 1958 as « HARMON R. WILLIS & Family », again on Dixie-NC [=North Carolina, one can assume] 123, « Crossing Over Jordan », a very good sacred Hillbilly. Finally Bill Willis also issued the fine double-sided « Boogie Woogie All Night »/ »Where Is My Baby », a classic Rockablly on Dixie 825 (value $ 300 to 400).

Another Rockailly bopper, « Wanted, Dead Or Alive » comes next on the G. B. 406 label by CURTIS WILSON : urgent vocal, and a good rhythm guitar. Other records of interest are : « Teenage Party Line » (Canary 6417) and « My Heart Is Made Of The Blues » (Cherry 1014 – the very same Scottsville Kentucky label which did bear Art Adams, Judy Capps or Johnny Hargett and Tommy Holmes – phew ! what a Rockabilly poster!). Alas, Wilson’s records didn’t live up to their promises, as they were teen rockers.

Carl Perkins

On to a star, which is unusual in bopping. CARL PERKINS in May 1955 cut the Hillbilly bopper (very near to Rockabilly) « Let The Juke Box Keep On Playing ». A very great Rockaballad, warm voice, guitar and bass – steel by Stan Kesler and fiddle by Bill Cantrell, both stalwart accompanists on more than one Hillbilly session at Sun or Meteor. This record is perfect !

Wayne Busbice

Frankie Short & Dee Gunter

Finally from Baltimore, MD the frantic voiced duet « Country Boy Trock And Roll » (mandolin, fiddle and banjo) by FRANKIE SHORT and DEE GUNTER on the Wango label (# 201), which bopping researches on. Short (with Green Valley Boys) had another interesting record, « No Longer Sweetheart Of Mine » during the early ’70s. Indeed the original to “Country Boy..” had been cut late 1956 by Don Reno & Red Smiley on King 5002: Short and Gunter do frankly copy this original.

And that’s it for this late February 2019 selection. My thanks go to CheeseBrewWax YouTube chain ; to 45-cat for several label scans, as « Ohio River Records » site ; Tom Lincoln’s book for the value of Rockabilly/Rock’n’roll records ; consulting also Michel Ruppli’s book « The Mercury Discography » was also helpful (Merle Lindsay record) ; finally my own archives.

The bouncy music of SLIM RHODES: Memphis, 1950-1956

For over twenty years, the Slim Rhodes Show was an institution on Memphis radio. Starting out as a family group, the Rhodes maintained this characteristic through three generations despite a continually changing supporting cast.

Originally from Arkansas, James K. Rhodes formed a group called tte Log Cabin Mountaineers in Poplar Bluff, Missouri in 1936. At the core of the group were James’ three sons;: Ethel Cletus ‘Slim’ Rhodes, vocalist and guitarist ; Hillburn ‘Dusty’ Rhodes, vocalist and fiddle player ; and Gilbert ‘Speck’ Rhodes, bass player and comedian. The early group was completed by Dusty’s wife, Bea, a singer.
Slim was the eldest of the sons, born in 1913 in Pocahontas, Arkansas and the leader of the group. Working in Missouri – Arkansas border, the Log Cabin Mountaineers drew upon the sounds of Western swing emanating from Texas and the south west, together with the musical traditions of the Ozark mountains.

From the outset, though, the band was also a localised purveyror of prevailing music trends. Particularly after Slim gained a regular radio show on KWOC in Poplar Bluff in 1938, he came to recognize the value of balancing his natural feel for western swing with a responsiveness to public demand. Two decades later, Slim Rhodes’ Memphis recordings would form a chronological illustration of changing musical times in Memphs, from western swing to hillbilly to rock’n’roll.

The Rhodes band continued to operate as the Log Cabin Mountaineers during the early part of the 1940s, appearing not only on KWOC but on KLCN, Blytheville, Arkansas and KARK in Little Rock, Arkansas. Then, in 1944, the band joined WMC in Memphis and commenced a noontime country music show that ran almost daily until Slim’s death in 1966. For the latter half of this 22 year residency, the Rhodes Show also appeared n WMC TV and provided a platform for many aspiring local musicians. This experience came in useful when Speck later joined the nationally networked Porter Wagoner TV show out of Nashville in the 1970s and 1980s.

By the time they moved to Memphis, the Log Cabin Mountaineers had obtained the sponsorship of a floor company. They worked on WMC as the Mother’s Best Mountaineers. Their popularity increased through the 1940s to the point in 1950 when they were a natural target for Sam Phillips and his newly-opened recording enterprise.

Let’s take then the shortest possible digression from Slim Rhodes and his brothers, to introduce their guitarist : Brad Suggs (also called “Pee Wee”, “L.B.” or “Junior”) had his first professional affiliation with the Loden Family, around 1950. Sonny Loden, the later Sonny James, sang and played fiddle with the group. He wanted Suggs to go on the road with him, but Brad was married and had family obligations, so he chose not to.

Brad Suggs

Instead, he went to work with the Slim Rhodes band, once again joining a family group of musicians. Suggs played with them when he first got to Memphis until he went into the Army. They were going to send him to Korea, but he had two brothers who had already died in the war (Suggs came from a family of twelve), so he was allowed to stay Stateside. After his demob, probably in 1954, he went back to work for Slim Rhodes.

Suggs played guitar with the Rhodes band on all their Sun recordings, appearing as a featured vocalist on three of them in 1955-56: “Don’t Believe” (Sun 216), “Are You Ashamed Of Me” (Sun 225) and “Bad Girl” (Sun 238), all country ballads.

Like several other Sun alumni (Charlie Feathers, Malcolm Yelvington, Little Milton, Jimmy Haggett), Suggs also made a brief trip across town to record a rockabilly single for Lester Bihari’s Meteor label in 1956 (“Bop Baby Bop”/”Charcoal Suit”, Meteor 5034). But his true home territory was 706 Union Avenue. Brad hung around Sun a lot in those days. One thing led to another and he started doing studio work as a guitarist. Among the records he plays on are “Ubangi Stomp” by Warren Smith and “Hillbilly Music Is Here To Stay” by Jerry Lee Lewis.

UBANGI STOMP
(Charles Underwood)
WARREN SMITH (Sun 250, 1956)
Well I rocked over Italy and I rocked over Spain
I rocked in Memphis, it was all the same
Well, I rocked through Afrika and rolled of the ship
And seen them natives doin’ an odd lookin’ skip
I parted the weeds and looked over the swamp
Seen them cats doin’ the Ubangi-stomp
Ubangi-stomp with the rock and roll
Beats anything that you’ve ever been told
Ubangi-stomp, Ubangi-style
When it hits, it drives a cool cat wild
Well I looked up the chief, he invited me in
He said, a heep big jam session’s ’bout to begin
He handed me a tom-tom, I picked up that beat
That crazy thing sent shivers to my feet
I rocked and I rolled and I skipped with a smile
I done the Ubangi-stomp, Ubangi-style
Well we rocked all night and part of the day
Had a good rockin’ time with the chief’s daughter May
I was makin’ good time and a-gettin’ to know
Then the captain said son, we gotta go
I said that’s alright, you go right ahead
I’m gonna Ubangi-stomp ’till I roll over dead
Courtesy Black Cat Rockabilly Europe
http://blackcatrockabillyeurope.com

Phillips recorded eight sides with the band under Slim’s name in 1950 for release on Gilt Edge Records of California. Concentrating on boogie and swing based styles, the Gilt Edge discs featured Slim and Dusty on vocals with fine fiddle and steel support spiced with energetic electric solos from Pee Wee Suggs.

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In 1955, Sam Phillips recorded the Rhodes band again, this time for Sun. Despite a similar line-up to that of the Gilt-Edge era, the sound of the band was now much more hillbilly influenced. Subsequent sessions developed further, toward a rockabilly sound, and Slim’s vocalists changed from the swing balladeers (Slim, Dusty and Brad) to rockabillies like Sandy Brooks and Hayden Thompson (*).

1958. Perhaps Sandy Brooks on mike

Under the competition of a newer generation of rockabilly combos, Slim Rhodes soon found himself dropped from the Sun label. Although he did make several other recordings for labels like Cotton Town Jubilee, including an interesting promotional disc for Hart’s bread on the Hart’s label, Slim mainly concentrated on radio and TV work. New generations of the family came through, from sister Dot (who also recorded as Dottie Moore on King) to Slim’s niece Sandra Rhodes who at one time pursued a solo career with Fantasy Records, and sang as a backup singer on countless sessions at Hi Records.

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The full story of the Rhodes band would take more space than is available here, and much more work remains to be done in interviewing members of the Rhodes band and fleshing out the contribution they made to country music in the mid-south. (Martin Hawkins, 1986)
(*) It is probably an error from Mr. Hawkins, as it is highly improbable that Hayden Thompson, out of Tupelo, MS., ever sang with Slim Rhodes.

Aknowledgements: Martin Hawkins (“Good Rockin’ Tonight”, book of 1996); generous use of 78worlds; music from various sources; Hillbilly-music.com for several details and pictures.

Try to find the 1996 CD on Gee-Dee

Discography of Slim Rhodes is available on the Praguefrank site: https://countrydiscography.blogspot.com/2011/02/slim-rhodes.html

Jackson, TN. Hillbilly Bop and Rockabilly: CURLY GRIFFIN (1955-1957), “Got Rockin’ On My Mind”

CURLY GRIFFIN
”CURLY WAS A GOOD FRIEND OF MINE”


(Carl Perkins)

My interest in Curly Griffin and his music stems from the time I started to collect Carl Perkins’ records and noticed the name Griffin as co-writer on ”Boppin the Blues” and ”Dixie Fried”. No information was available until the mid 1970’s when I purchased the single ”Rock Bottom Blues”/”Got Rockin’ On My Mind” that I brought with me when Erik Larsson and I met Carl Perkins at Hotell(sic) Windsor in Gothenburg in April 1977. Some information in this article comes from this meeting. When Rayburn Anthony toured Sweden in May 1993 I mentioned the name again and see, Curly’s son Ron had played the guitar in Rayburn’s band. I got the address to Ron who very kindly shared information and pictures for this little piece in a letter. Also Carl Perkins has made considerable contributions sharing memories about his old pal Curly.

Curly Griffin (crouching, left) and Carl Perkins (seated)

Malcolm Howard Griffin was born June 6, 1918 and his biggest musical influences came to be Bob Wills, Slim Whitman and of course also Hank Williams. Malcolm got the nick name “Curly” most likely because of his curly hair. He had bad eye-sight and his son Ron claims his father only had 10% vision, and most of his education took place in a school for blind people, where he also had lessons in fiddle playing. After his schooling was over he took up the guitar and started playing hillbilly and country music. He also had an interest in blues and pop. His poor vision made him trying to support himself as a musician as his handicap made it hard for him in other trades like carpenter and painter, but anyway Curly helped his father build some houses in the eastern parts of Jackson, Tennessee. Later, one of the streets was named Griffin Street. But it was as a musician Curly made a name for himself and over the years he had at least three different bands. His wife Helen, a good singer, was in two of them.

WDXI studio, Jackson, TN. Mid-’50s. Earl White (f), J.O.White (m), Curley Griffin (g), Bill Wallace (g), ? (steel), David (b)

Now over to Carl Perkins who tells us that he first met Curly at the radio station WDXI in Jackson, Tennessee where Curly and his band had a 15 minutes show. The same amount of time was also scheduled for Carl and his brothers Jay and Clayton. Also Ramsey Kearney who was very inspired by Eddy Arnold had a show here. Carl says Curly wasn’t the best of singers but he was very ambitious, something needed as his family was large consisting of wife Helen and children Patsy, Ron, Kenneth, William, Tommy and Don. Curly’s style was in the Hank Williams vein. Carl:
-About 1955 I moved down to Parkview Courts……………..anything with that Curly”.
It must have been around this time Curly recorded his first record. It was for the label Atomic Records owned by his father. Ron: “Curly´s father got into and was learning the record business with the Atomic label”. The recordings took place in Nashville (In 1955 according to the liner notes of Stomper Time CD 22) , probably in the RCA studio in Nashville, Tennessee and among the musicians were Chet Atkins on guitar and ’Lightning’ Chance on bass. The songs were the funny piece “Gotta whip this Bear” and “Just for me”. According to Ron Griffin the record only came out on 78 and Carl Perkins remembers a very excited Curly came over to his place to play him his record, and Carl did find it good.

On stage, mid-50s. Curley Griffin (g), Earl White (f), Helen Griffin [Curley’s wife](vo),David (b), Charlie ‘Chuck’ Rhodes (steel)

Curly’s biggest moment as composer must have been when he came up with the line “Boppin’ the Blues” that he presented to Carl who immediately went for it, Carl:
-“Boppin’ the Blues”, he had the title….after “Blue Suede Shoes”.
The record (Sun 243) thus became the follow up for ”Blue Suede Shoes” and was a decent hit peaking at the ninth place in the country charts. The song was published by Hi-Lo Music owned by Sam Phillips. Carl again:
-I remember that after “Boppin’ the Blues” came out………………that was happening then.
But Carl being a kind human being gave Curly a couple of hundred dollars in advance, but one can wonder with hindsight if Curly ever got any money at all from Sam and Hi-Lo Music. Back to Carl:
-Then, I don’t remember, probably……………………………I picked out a line or two that he had.
The song “Dixie Fried” has really became a classic tune and the follow up to “Boppin’ the Blues”. Many have recorded the song but no version matches Carl’s original recording.

If we return to Curly’s own records the next was “I’ve seen it All”/”Magic of the Moon” on Atomic 302 (probably from 1955). Top side is a fast hillbilly tune, while the flip is a standard fare country ballad with a waltz beat. We have no information about the musicians but the tracks to us sound like they’d been recorded before the breakthrough of Rockabilly, but we may be mistaken. On “I’ve Seen It All”, the guitar player sounds very much like Carl Perkins though.

Cash Box, Dec. 1, 1955

Then came Atomic 303 in 1956 with “You Gotta Play Fair”/”Love is a wonderful Thing” [untraced, probably a slowie] and we have no information here either. “..Play Fair” is again a fast Rockabilly, strong and romping, but there is no aural evidence of the typical Carl Perkins’ playing style.

We have more information, albeit contra dictionary on Curly’s fourth and last platter, ”Got Rockin’ on my Mind”/”Rock Bottom Blues” on Atomic 305 from early 1957. In an interview Carl Perkins claimed it was recorded at the radio station WDXI in Jackson Tennessee with himself, Clayton and Jay B playing as well as an unknown piano player. Also drums are audible. In the middle of the piano solo Curly shouts something like “Aw, get it blue sueders” and “Blue Suedes” was the moniker Carl used for his group at that time (1956-1957. When I (Claes-Håkan) asked Ron if Carl ever played with Curly he wrote that:
-They might have played a gig together and some jam sessions but I played guitar for him on his recordings (except for the first) and as his band guitarist after his second band. If he (Carl) ever worked on a recording, I’m unaware of it.
We find Ron’s statement more likely to be true, as the band playing doesn’t sound much like Carl and his band and to get more evidence Claes-Håkan called W.S. Holland, the drummer for Carl in the 50’s before he joined Carl Mann’s band and later proceeded to Johnny Cash as a member of the Tennessee Three. When asked if he ever played with Curly W, S. replied:
-I’ll be damned. I’ve lived in Jackson all my life, I knew Curly and I know Ron, but I never knew that Curly made a record, and here’s a guy calling me from Sweden telling me this.
But in the letter from 1993/1994 Ron is totally unaware of Atomic 302 and 303 and only states he played guitar on “Rock bottom blues” and “Got rockin’ on my mind” leaving us with the possibility that Carl and his brothers (sans Holland) played on any or all of these tracks and in fact “You Gotta play fair” sounds a little like Carl, but maybe it’s just wishful thinking.

Curly’s also written two tunes, “Blue River” and “I’m Writing The End”, which were recorded by Jerry Jeter on Fort Worth, TX. Bluebonnet label (# 701) in 1959. Furthermore Curly (as Howard Griffin) composed both sides of Tony Snider’s “They call it Puppy Love”/“Fool for Jealousy” on Jackson, TN Westwood label (# 203). He also wrote “Traded My Freedom” for Rex Hale (Atomic 307).
One can argue that Curly’s musical career is no more than a foot note in the annals of Rockabilly and Country and Western, but an important one none the less being involved in the composing of two of Carl Perkins’ classical tracks ”Boppin’ the Blues” and ”Dixie Fried”. Howard Griffin has 16 songs registered at BMI. See below.
Curly died in 1970 after losing a long battle with cancer and we leave the final words to Ron who wrote:
-He believed in his family, songs and music. Everyone who knew him learned and benefitted from his life. The family thanks you for the chance to tell some of his story.
Atomic 300 Gotta whip this bear/Just for me
Curly-vocal and guitar, Chet Atkins-lead guitar, Lightning Chance-upright bass

Atomic 302 I’ve seen it all/Magic of the moon
Curly-vocal and guitar

Atomic 303 You gotta pay fair/Love is a wonderful thing
Curly-vocal and guitar

Atomic 305 Got rockin’ on my mind/Rock bottom blues
Curly-vocal and guitar, Ron Griffin-lead guitar

The songs below are the ones registered at BMI on August 15, 2018 as by Curly, as sole or shared author. Strangely, “Just for me” from Atomic 300 is not registered.

Blue River (or Blue River Belle); Boppin’ The Blues; Dixie Fried; Fool For Jealousy; Foothills Of The Smokies; Got Rockin’ On My Mind; Gotta Whip This Bear; I’m Writing The End; I Traded My Freedom; I’ve Seen It All; Love Bug Blues; Magic Of The Moon; Rock Bottom Blues; Tennessee Moonlight; They Call It Puppy Love; You Gotta Play Fair; and the non-registered “Just For Me”.

Sources: Original article by Claes-Håkan Olofsson 1994 (in Sweden’s American Music Magazine # 62) with support from Bo Berglind. English translation, additions and slight editing by Erik Petersson 2018. Photos by Ron Griffin. Used by permission from AMM editor Bo Berglind. Sincere thanks to all of them, and more precisely to Erik Petersson (“Magic Of The Moon” soundfile) and Germany’s own Ronald Keppner for “Just For Me” soundfile.