late April 2011 fortnight’s favorites

Hi there. First the state of Utah is not well known among Hillbilly lovers. Sole artist I know from this state is RILEY WALKER. I already posted in a past “fortnight’s favorites” his great “Uranium Miner’s Boogie” (Atomic label – 1951? 1955? Impossible to date this, as it is so crude and primitive). Here I’ve chosen a second offering from Walker, less impressive, although almost equally good, on Atomic (# 703) , the amusing “It’s A Little Late“. Solid backing from his band, the Rocking-R-Rangers.

atomic walker lateroto sullivan

Let’s get back to the mid-sixties and NORMAN SULLIVAN (With The Country Rhythm Boys) on th ROTO label (unknown location), and a fine rendition of the Johnny Cash’s classic “Folsom Prison”, given a Country-rock treatment. Could mid-sixties.

Sarg Isbell Let's P.R.C. Carnes daddycountry  Country- cousins  heart's

Then, from a definitely not as known as he deserves – I’ve named SARG records, out of Luling, Texas. This label issued many a fine Hillbilly/Rockabilly/Rock’n’Roll. You name? DAVE ISBELL, Neal Merritt, Herby Shozel, Eddy Dugosh, The Moods, Chester McIntyre, just a few of artitts on the Sarg label between 1954 and 1964. I’ve chosen the great DAVE ISBELL‘s “Let’s Do It Up Brown” (45-109), which has nothing to do with the Memphis’ Bud Deckleman song of the same name. More on SARG records on the pipeline!

Completely unknown to me, this PAUL CARNES, who apparently cut the record at his own expense on the  P.R.C. (penned by Paul R. Carnes) label. I cannot suspect any location, neither date: 1957-1958, I’d assume, for the fabulous “I’m A Mean Mean Daddy“. Very crude vocal, sparse backing. That’s HOW a true rural Hillbilly should be sung and played!

A little more light shed on the COUNTRY COUSINS (Denny Buck and Harold Weaver), who cut the B-side (A- unknown to me) for the very rare Country Records out of Oklahoma City, apparently only on 78rpm. Hence his rarity. This could be from 1955.

Finally, back to Rocking Blues for a change. The nickname “Sonny Boy” was adopted by two big figures in Blues, the first (prewar harmonica artist) was from Chicago, and died in 1948; the second (rn Rice Miller, hailed from Mississipi)  came North in 1954 to cut for Chess as “Sonny Boy  Williamson“. A third, far less known, without douby capitalizing on the popularity of the others, called himself only “Sonny Boy Williams“. He came from Florida, and cut in Nashville for the Duplex label, late ’50s, this little opus, “Alice Mae Blues“. It rocks!

duplex williams alice

As always, envoy the selections, as I did preparing this feature. Don’t forget to go to “Contact Me” section: some records/books I am selling could be of interest to you. Till then, bye-bye!

Link Davis: The Man With The Buzzin’ Sax

LINK DAVIS

THE MAN WITH THE BUZZIN’ SAX

 

The name LINK DAVIS is well known to the fans of a number of musical styles. Over a period of three decades, he was involved in Western Swing, Hillbilly, Cajun, Rockabilly, Roll and Roll and Blues recordings, either as a recording artist in his own right or as a supporting musician.  LAKE HOUSTON (more…)

early December 2010 fortnight’s favourites

Howdy folks! Here are my ‘new’ favourite tunes of  early this month. As usual I try to give you oddities to illustrate the music, although lacking of inspiration and enthusiasm this time!

Red and Lige, The TURNER BROTHERS, were a duet group from Tennessee. I don’t know if they were related to the more famous brothers, Zeke and Zeb (King and Bullet labels). They offer here a strong Country-boogie with  “Honky Tonk Mama” on the Radio Artist label (the one which issued Jimmie Skinner first sides). Circa 1950.

turner brothers CDradio art.243 turner PECK TOUCHTON, a native of Texas, had a solitary release on Sarg (“You’ve Changed Your Tune“). He also recorded for Pappy Daily’s Starday label, without seeing any issue, following a mixing of label stickers during a car wreck! The whole story was told by Andrew Brown in his excellent site, Wired For Sound. See it here:
http://wired-for-sound.blogspot.com/search?q=peck+touchton

Touchton’s record, “Let Me Catch My Breath” was finally issued under the name of George Jones (Starday 160).

Starday160 touchton

Out of Texas or West Louisiana, and at one time associated as a singer with Bill Nettles, DANNY DEDMON had records as early as 1947 on Imperial. Here is his “Hula Hula Woogie“, typical Texas Honky-tonk of the late Forties, with a touch of Western swing. imperial 8019 danny dedmonThe Rhythm Ramblers were actually Nettles’ band.

George and Earl pic

George McCormick (he had discs on M-G-M, for example, “Fifty-Fifty Honky Tonkin’ Tonight”) and Earl Aycock teamed as GEORGE & EARL in 1956, and had a string of Rockabilly releases on the Mercury label. I’ve chosen one of their most dynamic sides, “Done Gone“. Nashville musicians behind them. The duet folded shortly afterwards.

mercury 70852 george Out of Nashville came CLAY EAGER on the Republic label. Although he was a celebrity as D.J. in the St.Louis/St.Paul, MO, area, he had cut this fine “Bobbie Lou” in Nashville. clay eager - bobbie louWe finish with the wild, rasping young ETTA JAMES on the West Coast. “Tough Lover” is backed by the ubiquitous Maxwell Davis.

etta james modern tough lover

late April 2010 fortnight

Howdy folks, here we go for the latest fortnight with JESSE ROGERS (born 1911, active in the Saint-Louis and Philadelphia areas), very popular artist during the 30s and 40s. Here he covers (RCA, 1948) BILL NETTLES’ “Hadacol Boogie”. Then two Mercury issues (6000 serie), first by NETTLES & His Dixie Blue Boys, from Monroe, Louisiana: “Push & Pull Boogie” – lazy vocal and fine backing. LOUIS (sometimes also called LOUIE) INNIS, from Indiana, had a string of Hillbilly Boppers, among them I chose the romping “Stomp That Thing” from 1949. The next three are all from Texas. PECK TOUCHTON, fiddler who recorded for The Sarg label out of Luling, had the fine “You Changed Your Tune” in 1954; famous CHARLENE ARTHUR was a crossover between Hillbilly and Rockabilly, and recorded in Dallas “Burn That Candle” in 1955. Finally the prolific RILEY CRABTREE,  a follower to Jimmie Rodgers, and his “Tattle Tattle Tale” (Country Picnic) from 1957.