Early June 2021 bopping fortnight’s favorites (at last, the return)

TOM TALL was a West coast country personality, who cut many a record. Here we go with one of his first ones, on the Fabor label (# 123)( 1955) with the average bopping « Underway ». Later on he went frankly Rockabilly on Crest Records (# 1038) in February 1958 with the classic « Stack-a-records » – « I got records here, I got records there, all over the place, but I am looking for the one that my baby likes to hear, where the guitar plays so fine -it goes (then solo) ». Great, great record !

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Hello everybody ! Well I’m not dead, but found myself in the hs)pital for the pas t5 months, after a serious illness. Thanks a lot to anyone who took time to encourage me and express care for my welfare. This means a lot to me. Anyway I’m back and ready to entertain you with mroe and more bopping music. Here we go :

Litterally nothing is known on the next artist, JIMMY THORPE, except he recorded for the King sub-label DeLuxe in 1953, so probaby in Cincinnati : « Locked in My Heart » (# 2006).

Trepur was a small label from La Grandenge, Georgia, which issued in te late ’50s some great records, e.g. “Milkman Blues” ‘1006, November 1958) by CHUCK JOYCE & his Chain and his Chain Gang, then “The Moon Won’t Tell” (1005, June 1958) , aimed at Country-rock aficionados for his good piano, by CHUCK GODDARD.

An all-time favorite of mine (since Tom Sims’ cassettes in the ’80s) is KEN HAMMOCK ‘ « It’s Now Or Never » (Starday 370) from 1960. Nice vocal and guitar.

We come to an end with, again on the West coast, with LYNN HOWARD and her « Red Thunderbird » on Accent 1044 from 1960.

As usual, various sources. Trepur sides do come from an old White label album ; Jimmy Thorpe and Lynn Howard from internet.

Early November 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello everyone ! This is the selection for early November 2019 fortnight’s favorites. Every track will be within the 1954-57 period, except the odd item from early ’60s or even later.

Riley Crabtree

RILEY CRABTREE was born in Mount Pleasant, TX in 1921, and followed first the steps of Jimmie Rodgers on his Talent sides from 1949. Later he adopted the Hank’s pattern, and was an affiliate of the Dallas’ Big Jamboree. Here on the very small Ekko label, he’s backed by the young Cochran Brothers Eddie and Hank for the bluesy strong « Meet Me At Joe’s » (# 1019) from late 1955. Nice piano, and of course fine guitar.

In 1957, he emerges on the Dallas’ Country Picnic label (# 602) with the fast « Tattle Tattle Tale ». Great ‘bar room’ piano, a good steel, and a Scotty Moore styled solo. Crabtree was confined on a wheel chair, and died in 1984 from a fire caused by an electric blanket.

Cash Box Oct. 12, 1957

In 1970 SHORTY BACON released his version of the Billy Barton small classic « A Day Late And A Dollar Short » on the Chart label # 5104. Despite the late period, it’s a nice country-rocker : great fiddle and steel are battling.

Walter Scott

Way up North on the Ruby label (first issue, # 100 out of Hamilton, OH) then WALTER SCOTT and the really fine bopper « I’m Walking Out » : a lovely swirling fiddle and a surprisingly good banjo. Scott had also « Somebody’s Girl » on an Audio Lab EP 35 (untraced).

Red Hays

‘RED’ HAYS (also sometimes named Joe ‘Red’ Hayes) was a fiddler as early as 1950 in the Jack Rhodes’ band in Mineola, TX. He offers here a nice and fast « Doggone Woman » on Starday 164 from October 1954. Good vocal for this jumping call-and-response bopper ; of course a fiddle solo, and all the way through a bass chords played guitar. The flipside « A Satisfied Mind » (a very sincere ballad) was covered first by Porter Wagoner, then had nearly 100 versions, among them Jean Shepard Capitol 3118), even Joan Baez’s or David Allan Coe’s. Hayes – according him being the same artist – went later on Capitol in 1956 for a ballad more (« I’ll Be So Good To You », # 3382 and an uptempo « Every Little Bit », # 3550).

DeLuxe was apparently a short-lived, small sublabel to the giant King, which issued some fine music. I’ve selected « Strange Feeling » by JIMMY THORPE (# 2006, from December 1953), who was seemingly more at ease with lowdown and medium-paced items (DeLuxe 2016 and 2018). Here is a solid bopper, although not a fast one. Good assured vocal and guitar, and a nice fiddle solo.

Bobby Lile

On the West coast, on the Sage label in 1956, BOBBY LILE « with music by Bob and Laverne » (who are they?) delivers « Don’t You Believe It » (# 222), a fine fast tune. The guitar player reminds me a bit at times of the great Joe Maphis – although it’s definitely not him there.

He was on the C&W serie of the big New Jersey concern Savoy, and bopping.org featured RAY GODFREY and his « Overall Song » (Savoy 3021) in the March 2013 fortnight’s favorites. Not a great singer, he had a good uptempo (« Wait Weep And Wonder ») on Peach 757, then the pop-country « If The Good Lord’s Willing » on Tollie 9030. Here he releases on the Yonah label # 2002 (March 1961) the passable « The Postman Brought The Blues » (good early 60s styled steel and fiddle).

Danny Reeves

Finally a very good double-sided country-rocker by Houstonian DANNY REEVES on ‘D’ 1206 (between July and September 1961). A nice baritone voice for the fast « I’m A Hobo » (great although too short guitar solo, very sounding 1956) and a fine guitar for « Bell Hop Blues ». This record was recently auctioned at $ 760 ! Reeves had also in 1975 his own version (untraced) of « My Bucket’s Got A Whole In It ». Before that he released in 1962 the double-sided rocker “Spunky Monkey/Love Grows” (San 1509) and, at an unknown date, the Countryish “Little Red Coat” on the obscure label L. G.Gregg 1001.

Sources : « Armadillo Killer » for Ray Godfrey ; Google images and the Starday project for Red Hays. Jimmy Thorpe from HBR # 50  Walter Scott and Shorty Bacon found on YouTube and Ohio River 45s site  Riley Crabtree from an HMC compilation; Gripsweat for Danny Reeves San issue.