Early October 2021 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night

by Hardrock Gunter

The veteran HARDROCK GUNTER does provide us his « Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night » (Decca 46300) cut in 1950. A nice bopper, an happy song. Good guitar and vocal.

Next, JOHNNY RECTOR, singer fronting Blackie Crawford and the Western Cherokees, a Houston group, does « If They Ever Get Together » : a bopper – steel, piano and fiddle.

Dub Adams on stage (’40s)

The fine DUB ADAMS with an instrumental « Pocahutas Stomp » on the Dude label (Dude JB 1498) : steel, piano and drums. Western tinged.

From the South now, JOHNNY FOSTER does offer « Turn Me Loose » on Capa 233. A duet, jumping country song, shrill guitar and a good guitar solo.

DAVE BROCKMAN had a disk on Starday Custom, the great « Feel Sorry For Me ». Here he is on the Pea-nut label # 1001 with « My Angel’s Gone to Hell ». Surely a Southern label. He’s been on the Fayette label # 1002 too.

The King of Yodel American Singers, as they call him, KENNY ROBERTS in his finest hour (Coral 64032). Intro by harmonica, a nice bopper, fine lyrics. The song was issued too by Lonesome Willie Evans on London and Little Jimmy Dickens on Columbia.

1929-30 the Godfather of Country music JIMMIE RODGERS did two of his better-known tune, « Mean Mama Blues » (with brass acc.) and « Never No More Blues », (flipside to « Mule Skinner Blues »)both cut by Victor. Both of them were revived by AL RUNYON on the Kentucky label, respectively # 577 and 581. Slow songs, only acc. by guitar. Runyon closely copies here Rodgers.

LARRY GOOD on the Kansas City label R (« Our ») # 517 cut a good Rockabilly with « Pick Up Your Hammer » ; good guitar, the vocal is OK

Finally from Louisiana, the romping « Drunkard’s Two Step » by ROBERT BERTRAND. Steel and accordion backing. Fais DoDo # 1000 (a colloquial word for dance halls)

Sources : many ; YouTube for several(Johnny Foster, Dub Adams) ; the others from my own archives.

Late July 2015 fortnight’s favorites

Let’s start this batch of fortnight’s favorites with a mysterious CURT HINSON. He hailed from S.C. and was at one time tied with WDLC in Dillon, S.C., where he was known as « Curt Hinson & His Sunset Troubadours ». Nothing is known about him except for two, maybe three records. The first one on Gotham 431, « Let’s see you smile » (1952) was coupled with « Down deep in my heart ». The first side is a nice uptempo, partly duetted (with the mysterious « Molinaro », who co-penned this track and the A-side on Carolina ?), over a chanting steel all along and a good swirling fiddle. The same songs were apparently reissued straight out on N.Y.C. Carolina label # 1001.

On Carolina 1003, Hinson has two « new » songs, « Cotton picking baby », a nice uptempo – weird and fooling fiddle, a steel solo and Troy Ferguson on the lead guitar. The flip side « You’re old love is haunting you still »[sic] is on a par with the presumably A-side. Fine relaxed vocal from Hinson, ably backed by a fluent guitar player. The identity of the guitar player was given by « HillbillyBoogie1 » on his Youtube chain, and I wonder where the information came from.

Let’s see you smile

download
Cotton picking baby

download
You’re old love is haunting you still

download

gotham hinson smilecarolina hinson cottoncarolina hinson haunting
From East coast we go now to Texas and the Fort Worth area. EARL WRIGHT & Texas Oldtimers has a good double-sider on Cutt-Rite in 1962 (# 100). « Married man blues » and « You don’t know it » are good Western swing flavored (prominent fiddle, even a solo) boppers. Nice guitar too, with jazzy overtones and a fine piano. A very nice relaxed record. Wright had at least another record, Jimmie Rodgers’ « T.B. Blues » on Bluebonnet 305 (untraced). March 23, 2018: a clip of “T.B. Blues” is included below. 

cutt-rite wright married

cutt-rite wright know

Married man blues

download
You don’t know it

download

“T-B. Blues” (clip)

bluebonnet wright t.B.

download

Now on to Ohio, with GLENN & VIVIAN WATSON, who do a good duet with « Just keep on going » on the Dayton, OH label BMC # 1000, from 1959. Fine picking guitar throughout a la Merle Travis. Vivian did in 1956 a solitary tune « Hoping that you’re hoping » on a budget Big 4 Hits EP # 195.
Just  keep on going

download

Finally I chose from Nashville a Murray Nash production [see Mellow’s Log Cabin i (hillbillycountry.blogspot.fr) for more info] by RALPH PRUETT and the song he wrote (not the blues/ traditional classic) « Louise » on B.B. 226, the very last one on this label, which saw no less than 3 Dixieland Drifters records. Topical lyrics, « Be-bop-a-Lula » is named, « Louise she’s my queen », over a relaxed vocal, with fine steel in the background plus an excellent fiddle solo.
Louise

download

 

 

 

 

bmc glenn & vivian goingbb pruett louise

Sad news in France : a GREAT guy is gone, Bernard Boyat. Fine discographer, essential writer and reviewer for many magazines [more than 50, among them the vital French “Rock’n’Roll Revue” or “Le Cri du Coyote”) since the ’70s, a true gentleman, he had an encyclopedic knowledge of Rock’n’roll in general, with a special sympathy for Louisiana and Cajun people. He did help the launch of “bopping” with the co-writing of the article NATHAN ABSHIRE in January 2009. May God Almighty save his Soul and let him keep Rock’n’rolling in Heaven !

 

As usual, my special thanks to Internet, Alexander Petrauskas for his site “hillbillycountry.blogspot”, and Youtube “HillbillyBoogie1”.

Eddie Noack “Wanderin’ Oakie”

EDDIE NOACK

Born De Armand Noack, Jnr., 29 April 1930, Houston, Texas/ Died 5 February 1978, Houston, Texas A.k.a. Tommy Wood. noack portrait

NOACK c50

Eddie Noack, 1950

Noack who gained degrees in English and Journalism at the University of Houston made his radio debut in 1947 and made his first record for the Gold Star label in 1949, “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”. In 1951, he cut several songs for Four Star including “Too Hot To Handle“.  TNT noack hot Leased to the TNT label, it drew attention to his songwriting and was recorded by several artists (including Sonny Burns) , most recently by Deke Dickerson, who also included “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” on his new (excellent) CD, “Deke Dickerson In 3 Dimensions”.

54 TNT 110

Noack joined Starday in 1953 (beginning a long association with ‘Pappy’ Daily), where his immediate success came as a writer when several of his songs were recorded by top artists including Hank Snow who scored a # 5 Country hit with “These Hands” in 1956.

starday 159starday Noack TellNoack noack Wind starday Noack donestarday Noack Think

Noack moved with Daily to his D label where in 1958, after recording rockabilly tracks as Tommy Wood, he had a country hit with “Have Blues Will Travel” (# 14).

56 St. 246d 1000 hookeyBB 16 fév 56 When the bright
54 Paul Jones

During the ’60s, Noack quit recording to concentrate on songwriting and publishing and had many of his songs including Flowers For Mama, Barbara Joy, The Poor Chinee, A Day In The Life Of A Fool and No Blues Is Good News successfully recorded by George Jones as album cuts.

In 1968, Eddie recorded “Psycho” for the K-Ark label.  k-ark psycho

This bizarre song, about a serial killer, was virtually unknown then since the original fifties version by its composer, Leon Payne (yes, the “I Love You Because” guy), had – understandably – never received any airplay. Since Eddie’s version it has become a cult favourite, covered by, among others, Elvis Costello. k-ark noack blues

Noack did make some further recordings in the ’70s, including arguably some of his best for his fine tribute album to Jimmie Rodgers. He moved to Nashville and in 1976, recorded an album that found release in the UK (where he had toured that year) on the Look label. He worked in publishing for Daily and Lefty Frizzell and in an executive role for the Nashville Song- writers Association until his death from cirrhosis in 1978. A fine honky tonk performer, somewhat in the style of Hank Williams, he is perhaps more appreciated today as a singer than he was in his own time.

A Fistful of Noack - cd2 - frontEddie Noack Ace LP Biography taken from Black Cat Rockabilly (Dik De Heer)

Below is a reprint of a New Kommotion article from 1976, “Talk Back With Noack”, in       which Noack tells his early story in his own words.

resco noack worse

A scarce ’60s issue

article revised on December 4th, 2011 (more…)