Early October 2021 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night

by Hardrock Gunter

The veteran HARDROCK GUNTER does provide us his « Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night » (Decca 46300) cut in 1950. A nice bopper, an happy song. Good guitar and vocal.

Next, JOHNNY RECTOR, singer fronting Blackie Crawford and the Western Cherokees, a Houston group, does « If They Ever Get Together » : a bopper – steel, piano and fiddle.

Dub Adams on stage (’40s)

The fine DUB ADAMS with an instrumental « Pocahutas Stomp » on the Dude label (Dude JB 1498) : steel, piano and drums. Western tinged.

From the South now, JOHNNY FOSTER does offer « Turn Me Loose » on Capa 233. A duet, jumping country song, shrill guitar and a good guitar solo.

DAVE BROCKMAN had a disk on Starday Custom, the great « Feel Sorry For Me ». Here he is on the Pea-nut label # 1001 with « My Angel’s Gone to Hell ». Surely a Southern label. He’s been on the Fayette label # 1002 too.

The King of Yodel American Singers, as they call him, KENNY ROBERTS in his finest hour (Coral 64032). Intro by harmonica, a nice bopper, fine lyrics. The song was issued too by Lonesome Willie Evans on London and Little Jimmy Dickens on Columbia.

1929-30 the Godfather of Country music JIMMIE RODGERS did two of his better-known tune, « Mean Mama Blues » (with brass acc.) and « Never No More Blues », (flipside to « Mule Skinner Blues »)both cut by Victor. Both of them were revived by AL RUNYON on the Kentucky label, respectively # 577 and 581. Slow songs, only acc. by guitar. Runyon closely copies here Rodgers.

LARRY GOOD on the Kansas City label R (« Our ») # 517 cut a good Rockabilly with « Pick Up Your Hammer » ; good guitar, the vocal is OK

Finally from Louisiana, the romping « Drunkard’s Two Step » by ROBERT BERTRAND. Steel and accordion backing. Fais DoDo # 1000 (a colloquial word for dance halls)

Sources : many ; YouTube for several(Johnny Foster, Dub Adams) ; the others from my own archives.

Late August 2009 fortnight

Howdy folks, here I am back with some goodies. First, Ole’ Buck is back for a song he recorded late in career for kids, IF YOU CAN’T FIND A REASON TO BE HAPPY. Romping Country rocker à la Buck Owens, of course! Then back to late 50s, early 60s, the unknown (to me) Doug Davis on the obscure Nite Star label (from Texas, I think) and the beautiful Country-rockaballad ALL BY MYSELF – lot of nice steel and heavy bass, rich vocal too. Joe Franklin next had a rich career by himself, and I still wonder what instrument he plays here, since the piano is to the fore – maybe him? The nice HITCH-HIKIN’ BLUES on MGM (1953). A romper now with Hardrock Gunter and his first version (on Bama, out of Birmingham, Alabama, 1951) of GONNA DANCE ALL NIGHT (he recut the same track in 1954, and leased it to Sun). In 1950 there were Country singers chanting “Gonna Rock and Roll, gonna dance all night”, yes sir! Something different now. A fine duet Bluegrass style, already a classic of the genre, ROAD OF BROKEN HEARTS, by the Webster Brothers, from 1954. We come to an end with a Prestige recording of Otis Spann – he lays down a very atmospheric OTIS IN THE DARK on the 88; Enjoy the selections!