late June 2021 bopping fortnigh’s favorites

Howdy folks ! This is the new selection of bopping fortnight’s favorites : no less than 11 or 12 tracks this time, trying to recapture all those 5 past months when bopping.org was sleeping and sick in the hospital .

We begin with J. C. CLAY on the Star label (# 506, from where I don’t know – Cees Klop once picked it up and reissued it on one of his « Rockabilly Hoodlums » series) ; a nice Rockabilly with strong bass rhythm . The follow-up is done on the same CD by

JAY McCOY

, and his « Everybody’s Lookin’ », a cheerful tune (not so often in bopping.org) was published as late as 1966 on the Nebraska Rebel label (# 5846).

CHUCK JOYCE (featured Early June for his Trepur 1006 side , « Milkman Blues » & Hollywoos Rhythm Wranglers, do come on Trepur 1009 with two songs, fronted on vocal by a Rusty Howard. « I’m Going To Do You Like You Are Doing To Me » : a fine Rocka-a-ballad with some harmonica ; the flip side, « Let’s Rock » , same vocalist, is a passable rocker – fine guitar anyway.

On to Washington, D.C. for

L. C. SMITH

on the Wango label (1958). He does the great guitar/banjo led « 

Radio Boogie 

» and « 

Honeymoon On A Rocket Ship 

» (original by Hank Snow), already issued (1rst version) in 1952 or 1953 on the Tennessee Kingsport label # 108 aided by Ralph Mayo on banjo. Smith had other good discs on Wango, maybe for a future Fortnight.

We turn way up North on the Fortune label, out of Detroit, Michigan.

BOOTS GILBERT

(& Bob Sykes with Chuck Hatfield on steel) issued in 1955 on Fortune 176 « 

Take It Or Leave It 

», a fine track (call and response format). Fortune had in its catalog many other great discs. Label was owned by Deborah Brown and her husband Jack.

West Va. born (1931)

BILL BROWNING

(and the Echo Valley Boys) had a fine string of Rockers and Country-rockers on the Ohio Island label, among them the classic « 

Dark Hollow 

» (1958), also done by Jimmie Skinner on Mercury. Browning was also on Enola 313 and Marbone 7026, and should not be confused with BILL « ZEKIE » BROWNING on Lucky.

RED HADLEY

cut in 1955 the good « 

Brother That’s All 

» (Meteor 5017) and disappeared afterwards, leaving behind him some tracks cut for Sun, not issued before the ’70s.

We come to the end of this selection with two late ’50s or even 1969 tracks by Bill Monroe ex-sideman

JIMMY MARTIN

. First with the superior bopping bluegrass tune « 

Hop, Skip And Wobble 

» (Decca 30496) and « 

Free Born Man 

» (Decca 32378).

Just to add something different, a great piece of Boogie Woogie from 1929 by the pianist

WILL EZELL

and his « 

Pitchin’ Boogie 

»: fine piano and a demented cornet.

That’s it for this time, folks. Hope you enjoyed the selection ! If you did, please leave me a comment below.

Sources : many. Netherland’s Cees Klop for some tunes from « Rockabilly Hoodlums » series ; Wango sides, Chuck Joyce from Internet. The rest from my huge sound/labels collection.

early February 2011 fortnight favorites

Howdy folks! Thanks for visiting my site: you are never less than 35-50 people each day. This is the proof the site is of interest to you, and it gives me in turn enthusiasm and heart to go ahead, search and find more hillbilly bop gems for your own pleasure.

Robert AUTRY INMAN (as christened) from Alabama had begun his musical career as bass player for Cowboy Copas and George Morgan in the latter part of the ’40s. A first recording contract wth Bullet in Nashville occurred in 1949, I will tell more about him in a future feature, when I have gathered enough biographical information (which is actually very sparse for his early career). 1952 saw him inked by Decca records, where he enjoyed moderate success, fine boppers and ballads. In 1956 he embarked freely on the rockabilly bandwagon and cut the classic two-sider “Be-Bop Baby/It Would Be A Doggone Lie“, I’ve chosen the latter side, in my opinion the better of both.

decca inman lie

tommy durden pic

Tommy Durden late 1990s

From Kansas City, early ’60s, a pleasant jumping country-rock tune on the ‘R‘ label, “There’ll Sure To Be Other Times” by OTHEL SULLIVAN.  He had another 45 on Wonder, which I have not heard. Judging by the RCA custom pressing number, it dates from 1960.

wonder sullivan call

The next artist in question, TOMMY DURDEN, born 1928 in Georgia, had a low-profile career for more than 40 years. Singer and steel-guitar player, he is best known today for being the co-writer of “Heartbreak Hotel”, which gave him comfortable royalties, even if he never wrote a follow-up. Early ’50s saw him , no one knows how, cutting for Houston’s Sol Kahal’s Freedom label, backed by the Westernaires. He had a regional hit, “Crossroads” (rejected by Four Star’s Bill McCall as “too pop”); but fare more interesting was “Hula Boogie“: Durden on vocal, a deft mandolin solo by Boots Gilbert (one-time Durden’s wife, later to have the classic “Take It Or Leave It” on Fortune), and a stinging, hot steel-guitar by the young Herb Remington.

From the Ohio State comes now BOBBY RUTLEDGE. He recorded for the Akron Zipp label some Hillbilly bop sides (“Southern Fried Chicken“); here you have the furious “Go Slow Fatso” from 1956.   zipp rutledge go

BUSTER DOSS & his Arkansas Playboys recorded first for Dallas Talent label this “Graveyard Boogie” in 1949, aimed at horror/halloween followers. Fine steel, call and response format, and a romping piano. He was the uncle of Bob Doss, famed for his Starday sides of the late fifties.

buster doss pictalent doss graveyard

Finally a boogie classic by CECIL GANT – he would die early February 1951 in Nashville, a mere 60 years ago, after a short 6 years musical run and innumerable boogies and ballads. Here I’ve chosen one of his best instrumental tunes, “Screwy Boogie“. Enjoy the selections!

cecil gant pic