A R&B label goes Hillbilly: the SPECIALTY 700 serie (1949-1954)

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red point: Shreveport

art-rupe

Art Rupe

Around 1948-49, several big R&B concerns, like Apollo, Modern, Imperial began to squint from the East and West coasts at the lucrative Country music market of the South. Major labels (RCA, Decca, M-G-M) were already running it, but without being locally positioned, they were losing sales, and could not exploit completely this rich soil. So people like Modern’s Bihari Brothers, Imperial’s Lew Chudd, or Specialty’s Art Rupe did seek for D.J.s and A&R men to help them to recruit good talent. And studio for recording locally. The Biharis concluded contracts with Sam Phillips, who leased them a good amount of Blues, which not prevented him to sell other sides to the Chess Brothers in Chicago. Finally Les, one of the Biharis, launched on place in Memphis Meteor records in 1952. The label found immediate success with Elmore James, and later in 1954 in the Country charts with Bud Deckleman. The Chesses came to an agreement to furnish them with masters with local promoter in Shreveport, La. Stan Lewis, who used the facilities of recording at night in the KWKH radio studio. Lew Chudd liked Jim Beck’s studio better in Dallas, Texas and found a certain commercial success with Texan artists : Billy Briggs or Jimmie Heap to name only two. Art Rupe (Specialty)specialty cover 45 prefeJerry Green cut - BB January 3, 1953rred KWKH for its East Texas/Louisiana border position. It has been suggested that his first Southern sides had been engineered by Johnny Vincent in Jackson, MS. But the aural evidence show the very distinctive Stan Lewis feel. Billboard (January 12, 1949) gave notice that Rupe had just inked his first 4 artists on the new Specialty 700 label. All of them were barely known, no doubt they had been approached by Stan Lewis’ relations or talent scouts. Actually only Earl Nunn may be localized with his band, the Alabama Ramblers, for the first issue. Previously he had co-written in 1944 with Zeke Clements the controversial (for its racist words) « Smoke on the water » for Red Foley (Decca 6102). He was probably vocally fronted by Billy Lee, who would have his own record (# 704) a little later.

EARL NUNN offers an enjoyable lazy mid-paced « Double-talkin’ woman », with a steel well to the fore (# 701). Actually the very same steel appears on these early sessions, and one can wonder if this is a studio man, possibly Shot Jackson ; the latter was indeed hanging around at KWKH, and even had his own issues (# 704 and 710, discussed below), not to talk about his work on Pacemaker with Webb Pierce. JOHNNY CROCKETT (# 702) has «Just a minute », a very fast talking blues in the manner of Tex Williams with piano and steel effects, that could easily fall into the novelty category. BRUCE TRENT third (# 703) delivers a jumping sad « Alimony » and the medium paced bluesy « River blues ». It can be noted that he had backed with his Western Tunesters some Hal Carey on a Ca. Jewel label (# 7002).

BILLY LEE does the ordinary hillbilly « I don’t know why I love you » (# 704), while LEO STANCIL had to wait July 52 for the release of his excellent effort « Why don’t you quit hangin’ around »(# 707)(two sides penned by Earl Nunn). Long steel solo for an awesome bopper, with sweet Southern accent !

Earl Nunn « Double-talkin’ woman« (701)

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Johnny Crockett « Just a minute« (702)

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Bruce Trent « Alimony« (703)

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Bruce Trent « River blues« (703)

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701 earl nunn702 johnny crockett703A bruce trent703BB bruce trent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leo Stancil « Why don’t you quit hanging’ around »

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707 stancil - hangin'It seems that the first 4 issues were released in a relatively short time after the label was launched, for example Specialty 703 (Bruce Trent) was reviewed by Billboard in March 1949, 704 in June 1949 although both the full years 1950-51 were blank in releases. Maybe Art Rupe was expecting more sales before cutting more records.

Things began to change a bit in 1952 with the advent of three new artists in the roster : namely CLAUDE KING, BIFF COLLIE and SHOT JACKSON. Collie has been discussed in full earlier in this site, so I omit him here. Claude King (born in Louisiana in 1923,deceased 2013) was not a newcomer. As soon as 1947, he had teamed with guitarist Buddy Attaway and bassist/entrepreneur Tillman Franks as « Buddy and Claude » for an issue on the small President label (HB-10), and a frequent theme for the era, « Flying saucers »
« Buddy & Claude«  »Flying saucers« 

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an agreeable and fresh jumping little tune, similar in style to that of the Bailes Brothers. president flying saucers

In December 1950, he recorded 4 tunes for the local Pacemaker label, which were also leased to the big Gotham East coast concern. On Specialty he cut three sessions, 10 tunes in all (2 remained unissued) – he wrote them all – between Spring and December 1952. « She knows why » (# 705) is an uptempo sad ballad (the same old story of the broken-hearted guy), which became seemingly the first hit of the Specialty Country & Folk label. At last, it had good sales and spinning reports in the South. So much so that it even had its answer song « He knows why » by Jeanette Hicks (Okeh 18021). « Take it like a man » (# 708) : the second release of Claude King has more rhythm and an insistant bass, a prominent piano and nice steel solo. Vocally King is in fine form, as in the next song « Got the world by the tail » (711), a little faster although in the same format as 708. Indeed King and his Hillbilly Ramblers had already found their way to the Louisiana Hayride saturday night show that had strong connection with KWKH radio. Actually Claude and Buddy Attaway were cast members of the Hayride since 1948, and wrote songs at the turn of the decade for Kitty Wells and Webb Pierce, who got them through Tillman Franks. Last Specialty 716 by him, « Now that I have you », remains untraced.

708 take it like a man

Note the ‘old’ Specialty design

711 claude king got the world by the tail

a rare 45

705 she knows why

Claude King « She knows why« (705)

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bb 14-2-53 claude king

Claude King « Take it like a man« (708)

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Claude King « Got the world by the tail« (711)

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Claude King « Run baby run« (Dee-Jay 1248)

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claude king buste

Claude King

claude king--tillman franks

 

 

 

 

 

 

Claude also worked one of Hank Willams’ last tours, as his driver and opening act. He also toured in the Shreveport area with Johnny Horton, but they spent more time fishing and hunting together than in the studio ! Record wise, he remained without a contract until 1957, when he cut the famous rockabilly/rocker « Run baby run » for Dee-Jay (# 1248), and turned in 1961 on Columbia in Nashville for « The comancheros » and « Wolverton mountain » ; but this is another story..It’s interesting to note that, if King wrote all his material, he’d publish his songs sometimes at a curious « Ark-La-Tex » publishing house other than the regular « Venice music » for Specialty recordings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The third new artist to appear in 1952 on Specialty is SHOT JACKSON (1920-1991), a steel guitar player. He did hang around at KWKH in 1950 and was the player (even sometimes singer on « Beautiful Hawaiian shores », or solist on some instrumentals) for all the Pacemaker sessions of Webb Pierce between December 1949 and January 1951. So it’s him playing steel on « California blues » to name only 1 of the score (circa 23) tunes cut by Pierce at KWKH. Jackson even had his Pacemaker record (# 1004) although sung by Pierce uncredited ! Needless to say, since Pierce, except 2 or 3 occasions, never used a fiddle, that Shot Jackson was the real force behind Pierce. He was indeed naturally intended to record for Specialty as soloist.

His 4 sides are uptempo honky-tonks, nothing spectacular, except in a negative way :  the machist « I’m trading you in on a later model » (# 706), and the deceiving « You can’t get the country out of the boy » (# 710) – such a title did merit a better treatment. Barely audible steel (short solos), an omnipresent fiddle; the voice of Jackson is forgettable. Note that current Hayride artists Johnnie & Jack gave him 3 of his 4 songs ; in return Jackson was to play dobro for them on numerous records onwards. Surely he was better on instrumentals, and after he built, with the help of Buddy Emmons (house steel-player at Starday), a double-neck steel baptized « Sho-Bud », he was to come again in light in 1962 on a compilation dedicated to steel guitarists (Starday EP 236).

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Shot Jackson « I’m trading you in on a later model« (706)

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Shot Jackson « You can’t get the country out of the boy« (710)

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shot jackson ? pict

Shot Jackson with Ricky and David House

courtesy David House, one of the boys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The third generation of artists on the Specialty 700 serie begins with the Texan JERRY GEEN. (born 1931) He was signed by Art Rupe early in 1953 and cut 4 sides.

« Naggin’ women and braggin’ men » (# 712) is a real good bopper, a tinkling piano well to the fore, followed by a nice steel and a rather embarrassed lead guitarist. « Are you going my way » (# 714) is a shuffler, well-sung and agreeable, with the same backing format. Leader is still shy ! Luckily piano and fiddle come to rescue the solo ..Green was also active indeed on the La. Hayride, before being drafted into the Army until 1955. He then relocated in Arkansas for a radio show « Country Capers » on a Fort Smith KFPW station. Then later he hit the big time with « Tripod the three leggged dog » which led him to Grand Ole Opry in 1967.

Jerry Green « Naggin’ women and braggin’ men« (712)

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Jerry Green « Are you going my way« (714)

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jerry green today

Jerry Green today

712 green - naggin' women

Jerry Green - 1951(Imperial)

Jerry Green 1951

Next artist was SMOKEY STOVER, D.J. in Baytown, Tx. He liked Claude King « She knows why », according to a Billboard snippet! Very few details came to light about him, except these : a native of Texas (Huntsville, 1928), he had his own band at 16 and began a long carreer Country D.-Jaying in Pasadena in 1948 only to retire from radio in 1995 in Gallatin, TN! In the meantime, he had been on numerous stations out of Texas, Mississipi, Louisiana (where he tried a career as singer), even New Mexico. He had records on Starday, Ol’podner, Stampede, Sage, Toppa. So now let’s value his Specialty product, cut at KWKH on November 15, 1952. « What a shame » (# 715) is a mid-paced opus ; nothing particular, a nice shuffler as too many in this era. Soli (guitar and fiddle) are interplayed and welcome. Vocal is firm but without any personal touch.

Smokey Stover « What a shame« (715)

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smokey stover

Smokey Stover

715 stober - shame

This is not the case with JOHNNY TYLER, a veteran (first sides in 1946 : « Oakie boogie » on Stanchel) whose story has been told in this blog before. He offers the bluesy partly double-voiced mid-paced « Take your blues and go » (# 713) ; good surprise : a spare harmonica a la Wayne Raney, without a sufficient volume. « Hillbilly preacher » (# 715) reminds me at times of someone sounding like, say, Luke McDaniel : fine guitar over an insistant rhythm backing. This type of material predates Tyler’s Ekko sides of March 1955.

Johnny Tyler « Take your blues and go« (713)

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Johnny Tyler « Hillbilly preacher« (715)

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Joyce Lowrance & Earney Vandagriff « Hush money » (718)

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717 tyler - preacher718 vandagriff - hush money

Last but not least, the elusive EARNEY VANDAGRIFF, whose story is hard to write. The details on him are near zero, except he came from Texas, and that he had records on Starday and Rural hythm between 1954 and 1957, among them the famous « Atomic kisses ». Here he delivers in a duet with Joyce Lowrance the happy and fast bopper « Hush money » (# 718), with a fine steel throughout and insistant fiddle.

And that was it, Art Rupe decided after 18 issues it was time to close a relatively not so lucrative affair, and concentrate his hopes (and money) on black music, be it Gospel (e.g. Soul Stirrers), R&B (a huge catalog) or, before long, Rock’n’Roll. A sign moreover of poor sales is given by the rarity of these Specialty 700 sides. Rupe’s rivals of Chess, Modern and Aladdin had come to the same conclusion for their part. Sole Meteor in Memphis remained open with the smash success of Bud Deckleman (« Daydreamin’ ») in 1954, before the advent of Rockabilly in 1956, and closed in 1957. But Sun was then at the right position to take advantage in the race for the hits.

 

Sources : Cactus CD « Specialty hillbilly » for music and CD tracks. Iconographic material : 78tpm.worlds for 78rm scans. Youtube for President Claude King 78 (scan & msic). Various entries on Internet for Art Rupe, Speciaty logo, Smokey Stover, Billboard records reports. Dominique Anglarès (warm thanks !) for Jerry Green and Shot Jackson pictures, also a full Bllboard page and interesting precisions. David House for Shot Jackson picture with Mr. House on Shot’s knee.

Early April 2015 fortnight’s favorites

En route for this new April batch of Hillbillies and Country rockers. First from Louisiana, the fiddler LARRY BAMBERG (rn Bamburg) does the fine relaxed medium bopper « Cheating on me » from 1956 on the Mira Lewis’ Shreveport, La. Ram (Royal American Music) label # 104. It has a very young James Burton, quite unusually, on the steel guitar and Leon Smith at the piano. Bamberg, whose name was not easy to pronounce, changed it to Lincoln for the bluesy (with sax) equally fine « My baby went away », cut at Ram, but issued on his own Fido 011 label (not posted here).

LarryBRomonaKerry

 

ram 104 larry bamberg

« Cheating on me« download
 

 

Next three tracks do come from Laeger W.Va. (at least the label) as late as 1969 by the one FLOYD FLETCHER on the F.A.F. label. « Daddy sings the blues » (# 26252) is a fast bluesy track with urgent vocal. « Move on down the track » does fetch to Rockabilly, while its flipside « You’re telling me goodby » [sic] is more in a sort of garage Honky-tonk vein (# 26282).

f.a.f. 26282 floyd fletcher daddy sing the blues « Daddy sings the blues« download
« Move on down the track« download
F.A.F. 26253 floyd fletcher move

f.a.f. 28281 fletcher you're telling me goodby
« You’re telling me goodby » download

 

 

 

RILEY WALKER next is no newcomer, as his « Uranium miner’s boogie » from 1955 is already a minor Hillbilly bop classic from Salt Lake City, Utah. See elsewhere in this site at the entry of his name. « It’s a little late (to come knocking on my door » goes by the same vein : a relaxed rural vocal, a nice steel throughout and a romping piano (# 703).

« It’s a little late« download

atomic 703 walker it's a little late

Next and last tracks of this fortnight do come from the B-W label, presumably a Nashville one, in 1961. PHIL BEASLEY and « Itchin’ to love you » (# 624) : a nice crisp guitar over a decent country rocker. KENNY BIGGS and « There’s no excuse » (# 615) has a mellow steel, an harmonica and some chorus and sounds a bit poppish.
« Itchin’ to love you« download b-w 624 phil beasley

« There’s no excuse« download
b-w 615 kenny biggs %22there's no excuse%22

b-w 615 kenny biggs there's no excuse

That’s all for this time, folks. Comments as usual are welcome.