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late March 2012 fortnight’s favorites
mar 15th, 2012 by xavier

Howdy folks! After a week of inconvenience (the site could not be opened) and a few ajustments, we are back for a new batch of goodies.

First from California, the unknwon (to me, at least) FREDDIE BYRD, backed by California Playboys, lays down the fine « Somebody Stole My Love » on the microscopic Ka Hi label. Even not an issue number! This is the same label as the one Jess Willard had his great « I’m Telling You » in 1957 on (see his story with the reasearch button). Fine Hillbilly ditty.

 

From Tennessee, the HOWINGTON Brothers for a good (unusual in bopping) instrumental « Haymaker’s Shuffle » on the Loop label (# 903B). The title says it all.      

 

 

Then a certain TOM JAMES on the Nashville KLIX label, from 1957. I’d assume this is the same guy that had some very good boppers on RCA several years before (« I’m A Pig About Your Lovin » or « Don’t Lead Me On« ). Here we have a real knack of Rockabilly with « Track Down Baby » (Klix 0001). Great guitar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From California again: DOUG AMERSON offers the very solid « Bop, Man, Bop » on the Intrastate label (# 15-25), from 1955. This is how Hillbillies went to wilder things.

 

 

 

From Mississipi, MACK HAMILTON. Indeed he had other records, namely on Feature from Jackson (« Will You Will Or Will You Won’t » has already been posted a couple of years ago). Backed by his Drifting Texans, he does a nice shuffling « Moaning In The Morning » on Diamond 1001 (reviewed October 1953 by Billboard). This was a brother label to Trumpet I’ve discussed before in this site.

Finally, a berserk wildie from 1963 on the NYC based Mala label: « Red Ridin’ Hood And The Wolf » by BUNKER HILL (# 457). They don’t go any wilder like this today.

Enjoy the selections. Constructive comments welcome.

Rusty & Doug Kershaw, Louisiana men (1954 -1964)
fév 7th, 2012 by xavier

ace CD

Douglas James « Doug » Kershaw was born on January 24 of 1936 on a houseboat near Tiel Ridge, Louisiana – a tiny island off the Gulf Coast of Mexico. Russell Lee « Rusty » Kershaw was born on 2 February 1938. Their childhood was difficult, and their father committed suicide when Doug was seven, soon after the family moved to Crowley. Their older brother Nelson « Pee Wee » Kershaw formed a band called the Continental Playboys, which the younger boys would later join. Rusty played rhythm guitar, while Doug began to excel on fiddle (he eventually claimed to have mastered 29 instruments). The band became popular and was appearing on KLPC-TV in 1953, alongside Jimmy Newman and Wiley Barkdull. Read the rest of this entry »

early February 2012 fortnight’s favorites
fév 1st, 2012 by xavier

Howdy, folks! Finally moved. More room for records, more space for living. Hope all of you are fine, still prepared for good ole’ Hillbilly music. Two classics will be discussed this time. All the podcast will be 78 rpm but only one 45: many a hiss! Read the rest of this entry »

early July 2011 fortnight’s favorites
juil 1st, 2011 by xavier

Howdy folks. We begin with the Starday label and CHUCK MAYFIELD, « Lucky Me » from 1955. Fine backing. Then, a perhaps surprising choice for Hillbilly bop, HANK PENNY, whose I like the drive and pugnancy of « Hadacillin Boogie » for RCA.

starday 161 chuck mayfield lucky me +RCA 20-4862 hank Penny Hadacillin boogie

A personality and band leader more than a good singer, DUDE MARTIN had good moments, like this Dick Stratton’s version of « Pistol Boogie ».

dude martin

Back to Starday and the fine, Rockabilly bordering Hillbillybop « Living High and Wide » by GLEN BARBER, deceased in 2010. He had previously cut the famous classics « Ice Water » and « Shadow My Baby » (which even had a sax – Link Davis?).

Very early ’50s, on the London label, we come to HANK DALTON (was it another pseudo for Wayne Raney) and his great « Hummingbird Special ».

To finish, back to April 1956 with PAUL DAVIS, « I Don’t Want A Back Seat Driver » (MGM 12472), a loping rhythm on this fine uptempo. I am pretty sure this is the same who cut 4 years later « Six Days On The Road » for the Bulletin label, forerunner to giant Bill Dudley hit in 1963.

glen barber

Glen Barber

Cat music: the roots of rockabilly – What does mean « cat » ?
fév 24th, 2011 by xavier

‘Cat’ has been used as a term in popular music since the Jazz years of the 1920’s. Revered by the ancient Egyptians, cats have a mystique and grace all over their own – no wonder these independent and mysterious animals became such a byword for ‘Cool’ in music from Hep Cats, jazz be-boppers of the ‘40s, and right through into 1950′s Rock’n’Roll.

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early January 2011 fortnite favorites
jan 1st, 2011 by xavier

Howdy folks! Beginnnig a New Year (and nearly two years of this site) with my Bopping wishes and a lot of good hillbilly music, here are BADEAUX (rn Ellas ) & THE LOUISIANA ACES. It’s Cajun cut during the ’80s, « I Can Live A Better Life« . Up onto North in Mississipi with MACK HAMILTON. He had records on Diamond and Feature out of Jackson. Here I’ve chosen the stomping medium tempo Honky tonk « Will You Will Or Will You Won’t« . feature 1095

RICKY RIDDLE was a native of Rector, Arkansas (as Skeets McDonald), and as the former, moved with family during the ’30s to Detroit. Early ’50s saw him entertaining in Nashville, and recording his first sides (moderate success) for the Tennessee label (see elsewhere for the label’s story). In 1954, he had switched to M-G-M and cut « Steamboat Boogie« , with Don Helms, ex-Drifting Cowboys, on steel-guitar. The words « Steamboat boogie / Rock, rock » are contemporary to Bill Haley’s « Rock Around The Clock », and Riddle pursued in the same vein on Coral and Decca in 1955-56

54 riddle

Billboard advert, 1954

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HAWKSHAW HAWKINS had several hits on King when he stopped in 1954 on RCA-Victor. As Riddle, he also used the new trend in « Waitin’ For My Baby (Rock, Rock) ». Nice uptempo Bopper, almost Rockabilly.  rca 5623 h.hawkins

Now a real rarity by RED MOORE, about whom nothing is known. He revived on his own label, Red (located North in Iowa), the old traditional « Crawdad Song » during the late ’50s.

red 840 red moore

Finally way up North with Chester Burnett, aka HOWLING WOLF, for a classic Chicago Rocking Blues from 1961, « Little Baby » (Hubert Sumlin on lead guitar). Enjoy the selections!

January 2nd. Someone did visit the site and gave me the link to RED MOORE. Here it is:http://www.rockabillyhall.com/RedMoore1.html

RedMooreBigPix1

Curtis Gordon, Hillbilly bop and Rockabilly from Georgia
mar 16th, 2010 by xavier

Curtis Gordon – Play the music louder (from 1998 Rick Kienzle notes to Bear Family CD 16253) gordon

At 1 :30 on Wednesday afternoon, October 22, 1952, newly signed RCA Victor recording artist Curtis Gordon began his first session at Brown Brothers in Nashville, with RCA A&R man Steve Sholes presiding. Three of his own band members joined him in the studio : fiddler Charles Mitchell, pianist Curly Gainous and bass player Slick Gillespie. Rounding up the band were three of Nashville’s early studio A-team : guitarist and Sholes protege Chet Atkins, singer and rhythm guitarist Eddie Hill and steel guitar virtuoso Jerry Byrd.

For Gordon, landing a deal with RCA, the label of Eddy Arnold and Hank Snow, was a major break. A regional performer who mainly worked south Georgia and north Florida and did occasional national tours, he fit into the honky-tonk sound in vogue at the time. It didn’t matter that he had no national home base like the Opry or Louisiana Hayride. He was a regional favorite around Georgia, Alabama and Florida, and in those days major labels didn’t shy away from signing such acts, hoping to break them nationally.

Born in July 27, 1928 on a farm near Moultrie, Gordon spent his boyhood drinking in music. « Ernest Tubb and Bob Wills were two of my favorites.(…) Ernest Tubb was really my idol until I got into Bob Wills. » Soon enough, Gordon was trying to sing locally, winning a talent show sponsored by a Moultrie radio station.moultrie, Georgia

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Bob Newman & The Georgia Crackers
fév 28th, 2009 by xavier

 

Bob Newman & The Georgia Crackers

Bob Newman should have been a millionnaire : he was one of the best Country music composers of the Fifties, under his name or his aliases (Lee Roberts). His rich, vibrant voice could have given him a far more successful career than he had. He remains a minor Hillbilly Bop artist.

However, he didn’t begin as soloist, but in the shadow of his elder brothers, Hank (born Henry, 1905) and Slim (born Marion Alonzo, 1910) in a trio, The Georgia Crackers . They came from a town near Macon, Ga. where Bob saw the light of day on October 16, 1915. Hank & Slim formed a duo during the Thirties, in the manner of the then immensely popular Jimmie Rodgers, and toured extensively in the Midwest and the South. Vocalion label recorded them in 1934 in New York. Later on, they settled down in Columbus, OH, where they founded a club, the G-Bar-C.


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