MACK HAMILTON & his Drifting Texans: « I’m a honky tonk daddy » (1953-54)

Nothing at all is known about MACK HAMILTON, (not even a picture), except he came probably from the Gulf, between Port Arthur, a mere 90 miles East of Houston, TX, and nearby Louisiana. And that is asserted only by the location of the two record labels he got to wax on between 1953 and 1954.

His first ever record was cut in Port Arthur for the Diamond Recording Company in 1953. To add much more confusion, a Diamond diskery was active during this period, which emanated from Beaumont, TX (on the Gulf too) and issued Country records, for example one by Morris Mills (Diamond # 101, « Jumbalaya answer« ), a rather prolific regional artist (also 4* and Macy’s). Although you may say it’s the same company with two locations, which has nothing to do with two other Diamond Co. in New York. This « Diamond Recording Company » was also a short-lived concern with only two issues, one therefore by Mack Hamilton (vocal and guitar): (Diamond CW-1001/1002) : the lugubrious mid-tempo « Moaning in the morning » (fiddle and steel prominent) and the self-conscious very Hank Williams styled « Sweet little Rosebud », a solid bopper, with even a short accordion solo, but steel and fiddle are once more well present.

Billboard, 31 October 1953

« Moaning in the morning »

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« Sweet little Rosebud »

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The second issue of the label was cut by Roland (R.A.) Faulk, as « Roland and his Rythm Boys » (sic). Sides CW 1003/1004 : « Send

me someone/I’d own the world ». are pleasant waltz tempo hillbillies. Nothing special, except a heay bass, a steel and a good piano and guitar. The singer is firm and confident : he was active on the Port Arthur area, and was to record in October 1956 the great Rockabilly « My baby’ gone » on Big State 592, a Starday custom, out of Port Acres, TX.(valued $ 700). But I am wandering from Mack Hamilton.

« Send me someone »

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« I’d own the world« 

Roland (R.A.) Faulk, « My baby’s gone »

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His next offerings were commited to wax in late 1953 for the Feature label, which was located in Crowley, La. and run by J.(Jay) D. Miller. Hamilton’s sides however were recorded at radio KTRM in Beaumont, TX. seemingly as a 4-tracks session. Backing Hamilton were Rusty (guitar) and his brother Doug Kershaw on fiddle, plus Louis Fourneret on steel. The tracks included two great Boppers : « I’m a honky-tonk daddy », completely Hank Williams styled with thudding bass and hot steel (Feature 1087A), and in the same pattern, « Will you will or will you won’t ?» (Feature 1095A).

« I’m a honky-tonk daddy »

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« Will you will or will you won’t? »

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« In a world without you »

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« A girl with too many sweethearts »

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Less fast were the flipsides, although very good on their part : the weepers mid-tempo « In a world without you » and « A girl with too many sweethearts ». And that was it. J. D. Miller wrote every Feature song, and must have had faith in « I’m a honky-tonk daddy », because he offered it to Wink Lewis on the very following number (# 1088). Lewis did a great version too. Later on he cut the great piano led Rockabilly « Zzztt, zzztt, zzztt » on the Texas Tone label (with Buzz Busby & his Band). I am wandering once more from Mack Hamilton, but there’s no more to relate about him : he disappeared completely from the music scene.

Wink Lewis, « I’m a honky-tonk daddy« 

Billboard Sept. 8, 1956

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Wink Lewis, « Zzztt, zzztt, zzzttt« 

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Notes : with great help from Ronald Keppner (Diamond recordings); notes by Bruce Bastin for Flyright vol. 19 (557) « Bayou boogie » ; my own archives.

Late November 2015 fortnight’s favorites

Not much info this time on artists or music I am afraid.

HAROLD MONTGOMERY has already been posted for his great 1969 bopper on Sun-Ray 139 « All them wives/Pardon me Jim« . This time I’m putting an equally good side with «How much do you miss me ». Wolf-Tex # 103 label, which emanates from Lancaster, KY. Solid backing by the Ray Johnson band over a hiccupy vocal. This record is sold between $ 300 and 400, maybe a lot more ! Montgomery had also « Thank you little girl » on Wolf-Tex 105, and « Gabriel doesn’t play a steel guitar » on Lemco (no #), both untraced.

wolf-tex 103harold montgomery - how much do you miss me« How much do you miss me« download

johnny daume picThe next artist was an itinerant D.J., who also carried from town to town his own record for sale. JOHNNY DAUME (Johnny Daume label # 1001) is an early ’50s double-sider with strong Western swing overtones : lazy vocal, a prominent fiddle and a discreet steel , all this reminds me of Texas bands of the mid to late ’40s. »Boogie woogie blond » and « Lookin’ fer a gal in Tennessee » are mouled in the same matrix, one slow, the other side more medium uptempo. A nice record.

johnny daume 1001B lookin' fer a gal fromTjohnny daume 1001A BW blond
« Lookin’ fer a gal from Tennessee« download

« Boogie woogie blond« download

 

 

 

 

From Johnson City, TN hails BILLY SIZEMORE. A fine country-rocker (heavy drums) over fiddle and steel for « My baby’s gone » (Edmac # 104). No other data available.

« My baby’s gone« download

edmac 104 billy sizemore - my baby's gone
Marty Robbins had done « Mean mama blues » on Columbia in early 1956 – urgent vocal and fast rockabilly backing. Same song is revived 4 years later on Circle Dot # 1002 (Minneapolis, MN) by RONNIE RAY. This version is on a par with the original. Ray also had another issue on Demand 101 (« My heart has to make it (on it’s own) » (untraced).

columbia 21477 marty robbins - mean mama bluescircle dot 1002 ronnie ray - mean mama blues

Marty Robbins « Mean mama blues« download

Ronnie Ray « Mean mama blues« download

 

 

« I don’t care anymore« download

« It’s rough« download

LES & His Western Playboys comes next in 1961 on the B-W label (# Q-609). A prominent steel over a light country rocker. Maybe Les was named « Haven » : that’s the writer of « I don’t care anymore ». This outfit had another on the Wel Burn label (parent to B-W) # 103 with the good uptempo from  1962, « It’s rough« , cut in Wooster, OH and reviewed on May 5th, 1962 by Billboard. Nice steel throughout.

w-b 103 les - it's rough B-W 605 les - I don't care anymore

armoneer 1003A ronnie newton - workingman's blues
« Workingman’s blues« download

 

 

 

 

 

 

Armoneer 1003 : RONNIE NEWTON and « Workingman’s blues ». A good 1959 record ; solid vocal and backing, fine boogie guitar and piano backing. Cut in Wynona Lake, Indiana.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes : all selections from the net or (Johnny Daume) from « Hillbilly Researcher » blogspot.

Starday custom series: # 576 to 600 (July to November 1956) — more Rockabilly to come…

H&C RECORDS 576 AL CLAUSER and his Oklahoma Outlaws

Tulsa, OK (July 1956)h&c 576-a al clauser cloudy loveh&c 576-a al clauser cloudy love

45-576-A – Cloudy Love

(Goldie Hood / T Conrad) (Starrite BMI)

45-576-B – Who’s Fooling Who

(Goldie Hood) (Starrite BMI)

Alas, although I have label shots, I have yet to hear either side of the disc. But at least I have some info, courtesy of the excellent and informative sleeve notes on the Bear Family Nashville Hillbilly Box Set. Clauser was first heard of playing with bands in Preoria, IL in the mid twenties and first recorded for ARC Records. He was based most of the time (at this point) around Cincinnati, OH and played on WCKY before relocating to Tulsa, OK, with a stint in Fort Worth, TX. After recording for Bullet Records, he also had releases on Arrow and Skyline from Tulsa. (Anybody got any details on these?). He also launched the recording career of Patti Page.

Backed by his Oklahoma Outlaws, he self released this fine Western Swing / Hillbilly disc on his own H&C label for local promotional purposes. What happened to him after this disc is a mystery to me.

STARDAY RECORDS 577 LUKE GORDON (July 1956)

Washington DC Area

HD-577-A – Is It Wrong

(Unknown Credits) (Starrite BMI)

HD-577-B – What Can You Do?

(Unknown Credits) (Starrite BMI)

Not seen or heard this disc as yet.

Dave Sax said…

This is his rarest in the series and, as the others, is superb if you love Gordon’s music. In some ways it’s the best with the walking bass played softly with the amp turned high. Shimmering fiddle and closer to the Sun sound than the others. Super songs from a top artist.

STARDAY RECORDS 578 « COUSIN ARNOLD » and his Country Cousins

(July 1956)Cousin Arnold  13 Oct 56 st 578starday 578-a "cousin arnold" heart of fantasystarday 578-b "cousin arnold" sweet talking daddy

45-578-A – Heart Of A Fantasy

(B McCraven / A E Baynard) (Starrite BMI)

45-578-B – Sweet Talking Daddy

(A E Baynard) (Starrite BMI)

Second (and at this point in time) final offering from Cousin Arnold. A side is a pleasant enough hillbilly disc, whilst the flip is again bordering on Rock-A-Billy, although this was possibly unintentional. With « Cat Music » hogging more and more of the radio airwaves, these country artists were forced to at least try to be sounding like they were keeping up with the times.

SPACE RECORDS 579 DON COLLINS (August 1956)

Lafayette, INspace 579-a don collins why am I lonelyspace 579-b don collins too late to be sorry

45-579-A – Why Am I Lonely

(Collins) (Starrite BMI)

45-579-B – Too Late To Be Sorry

(Fred Crawford) (Starrite BMI)

Untraced but the label shots.

FAME RECORDS 580 MACK BANKS and his Drifting Troubadors

Box 552, Houston, MS (August 1956)

45-580-A – You’re So Dumb

(M Banks – R Forman) (Starrite BMI)

45-580-B – Be-Boppin’ Daddy

(M Banks – H Brown) (Starrite BMI)

fame 580-a mack banks you're so dumbI could prattle on about this record, but instead I’ll let Mack tell you himself ….

« I wrote « You’re So Dumb » in 1954 and Houston, MS, USA radio station (WCPC) recorded it with one microphone, Hook Brown (lead guitar), Luther Foreman (standup bass), Charles Rome (fiddle) and me singing and playing rhythm guitar. It was number 1 at WCPC 19 weeks in a row. Dropped to 2 or 3 for a few weeks and back up to number 1 for a total of 26 weeks at number one. It was the number one song of the year in 1956. « Be-Boppin’ Daddy » was 4 to 6 months behind « You’re So Dumb » with Hook Brown (Lead guitar), Luther Foreman (stand up bass), and Tommy Coffee (drums) and me (vocals and rhythm guitar). It was number 1 for 7 weeks. The radio station sent these tapes to Don Pierce at Starday records and released it on Fame Records which I and the radio station owned but never registered the Fame name. My friend Rick Hall of Muscle Shoals, AL picked it up and registered the name about a year later. I have re-released these songs on CD MEB 0019. To my knowledge only 350 of the Fame 580 were pressed. »

fame 580-b mack banks be-boppin' daddy

Both sides are killer rock-a-billy in the highest degree! In fact, the intro to « You’re So Dumb » is goose-pimple inducing madness! What a darn fine record! Only 350 pressed! Of course Rick Hall wasn’t the only guy to use the FAME Record label – Jimmy Heap‘s Texan label springs to mind off the top of my head. But then again, nothing matters once you slap this disc onto your turntable.

BEVERLY RECORDS 581 THE SOUTHERN SPIRITUALS

Kinston, NC (August 1956)

45-581-A – Since I Laid My Burden Down

(No info) (Golden State BMI)

45-581-B – If I Leave

(No info) (Golden State BMI)

Untraced

STARDAY RECORDS 582 JIMMY AND DOROTHY BLAKLEY

starday 582-a jimmy blakley no one but youstarday 582-b jimmy blakley standing in line (for your love)jimmy blakley FC(August 1956)

45-582-A No One But You

(J Blakley)   (Starrite BMI)

45-582-B Standing In Line (For Your Love)

(J Blakley)   (Starrite BMI)

Dorothy played on quite a few Starday sessions. Some copies have ST-2656 & St-2657 in the dead wax. (These are probably 2nd pressings.) 582-A was also recorded by Neal Merritt on Starday 260.

Starday 583 unknown artist – acetate –

I’ll Fly Away With An Angel (?)

Cherished By A Song (?)

Del-Mar 584 DELMAR WILLIAMS SINGERS

Moorhead, KY

I Wanna Walk A Little Closer

The Gates Will Swing

Untraced

DEL-MAR RECORDS 585 THE DELMAR WILLIAMS SINGERSdel-mar 585-a delmar williams singers my journey home

Moorhead, KY (August 1956)

45-585-A – My Journey Home

(D Williams / L Williams)   (Starrite BMI)

45-585-B – The Last Love Letter

(G Williams / D Williams)   (Starrite BMI)

Judging from the writers credits, I would suggest that the Delmar Williams singers are a family affair. Not heard this disc.

PLOW RECORDS 586 TENNESSEE GEORGE and the Pennsylvania Plowboys

Bangor, PA (August 1956)

45-586-A – Cry baby

(No info)   (No info)

45-586-B – Butter BallPlow 586 - Billboard 16 Apr 55(mp)plow 586-b tennessee george butterball

(George Dry)   (Starrite BMI)

Never heard the disc. 586-A was re-recorded by Dave Dudley on Starday 364.

STARDAY RECORDS 587 ANDY DOLL – 6 Men and 16 Instruments

(Artist based in Oelwein, IA) (August 1956)

45-587-A – Goodbye Mary Ann

(A Doll)   (Starrite BMI)

45-587-B – Honey Dew

(A Doll)   (Starrite BMI)

Compared to most of the artist featured on Starday Customs, Doll is one of the more prolific artists. He had many discs released on his own AD label from Oelwein, IA, mostly pressed by RCA and by 1962, we find him the proud owner of the « Coliseum Ballroom » until 1973. He also toured extensively and backed up such luminaries as Pee Wee King.

BB 17 Nov 56 - Andy Doll(bb)andy dollstarday 587-b andy doll honey dewstarday 587-a andy doll goodbye mary ann

Anyhow, the A side is a nice song, set at what I guess is a waltz tempo, whilst the flip is more uptempo with a western swing flavour. All very pleasant to be sure, but not something that would set my heart racing. His later recordings on AD bordered on Rock-A-Billy in some places, but not on this occasion.

COXX RECORDS 588 SLIM COXX and his Cowboy Caravan

So. Coventry, CT (September 1956)

45-588-A Mockingbird Specialcoxx 588-a slim coxx mocking bird special

(S Coxx / B Dee)   (Starrite BMI)

45-588-B Lonely Nights

(S Coxx / J Albert)   (Starrite BMI)

Still waiting to hear the B-side. Slim’s real name was Gerard A Miclette. He played with his younger brother, Roland « Rocky » Miclette in various bands. By the time Roland came back from serving in the Navy, he joined Slim (who played fiddle like his father, George) playing bass in Slims’ Kentucky Ramblers. Eventually they came to the attention of the Down Homers, which featured Bill Haley (and Kenny Roberts) and joined them on the tidy sum of $200 a week wages. Once the Down Homers had disbanded, Slim & Rocky were playing at Lake Compounce in Slims new band, The Cowboy Caravan.

Rocky died on the 6th of May 2004 and Slim passed away October 13th 1999.

« Mocking Bird Special » is a pleasant enough fiddle instrumental. This was reissued on Starday EP 295 and Starday LP 114, and subsequently reissued again on Nashville LP 2015 (Album release credited to « Slim Cox. ») Haven’t heard the flip, but the lead vocalist is Jimmy Stephen.

SAN RECORDS 589 JOE BROWN and the Black Mt. Boys with Curley Sanders and the Santones (September 1956)

W.B.R.T, Bardstown, KY

45-589-A Midnight Rhythmsan 589-a joe brown midnight rhythmsan 589-b joe brown fishin' fever

(Sanders / Shirley)   (Starrite BMI)

45-589-B Fishin’ Fever

(Joe Brown)   (Starrite BMI)

Once again, nothing known about Joe Brown and his band. Curley Sanders will be covered next as he has his own release after this disc. Recorded at WBRT from Bardstown, KY so perhaps Joe was a DJ there.

« Midnight Rhythm » is a nice instrumental with fiddles and a nice guitar picker (Ody Martin?) doing a fine Chet Atkins impression. (Ody was name checked by Curley in a Billboard segment.) « Fishin’ Fever » is the slightly better side with fine vocals and fine support from the Black Mt. Boys and the Santones.

JAMBOREE RECORDS 590 CURLEY SANDERS

Buffalo, KY (September 1956)

45-590-A – Why Did You Leave Mejamboree 590-b curly sanders brand new rock and roll

(J R Sprawls / C Sanders)   (Starrite BMI)

45-590-B – Brand New Rock And Roll

(C Sanders)   (Starrite BMI)

Label states « A Product Of Sprawls Enterprises ». Label was owned by Joel Ray Sprawls.

Curley Ray Sanders was born in 1935 in St John, KY. he was a DJ on WCTO (Campbellsville, KY) in 1956, and on WBRT (Bardstown, KY) in 1958. WBRT is where he recorded with Joe Brown on San Records, possibly paid for by Curley. He was a regular on the Renfro Valley Barn Dance (KY) in 1958.

I may not know much about Curley but I found quite a few records by him. He  shows up in about 1949/50 on Star Talent from Dallas, TX (#749 – Last On Your List / Penny For Your Thoughts). There was a Curley Sanders (assuming it’s him) appearing on the Saturday Night Shindig over WFAA (Dallas) in the early 50’s. Then I find two discs on Imperial (#8197 – Love ’em Country Style / My Heart Is Yours Alone – Mid 53), (#8226 – Too Much Lovin’ / I’m Reaching For Heaven – Dec 53/Jan 54).

By 1956, Curley’s obviously incorporated some « Cat Music » in his repertoire and he’s found here hollering for all he’s worth (well, not quite hollering, but there’s an urgency in his vocals). The A side I’ve yet to hear. Flip is a stop/start rocker with cool lyrics and some fine accomp. by his band (who I presume are the Santones.) I think there’s an under recorded mandolin or something playing through the solos but the guitar is drowning it out. Anyhow, it’s a fabulous track. Almost awesome!

Curley springs up on the Concept label twice after the issue here and records another disc on Jamboree (which isn’t pressed by Starday). (Concept #897 – Dynamite / You’re Smiling (I’m Crying) 1957 – Elizabethtown, KY), (Concept #898 – Walking Blues / This Time – 57/8), (Jamboree 1833 – Heartsick And Blue / I’ll Obey My Heart – 57/58 – still located in Buffalo, KY and featuring the Kentucky Rangers). After that …

MECCA RECORDS 591 GENE STERLING

920 Third Ave, Seattle, WA (October 1956)

45-591-A – Living A Liemecca 591-b gene sterling I won't be back no moreMecca 591 - BB 15 Dec 56 gene sterling

(No info)   (Mecca Enterprises BMI)

45-591-B – I Won’t Be Back No More

(No info)   (Mecca Enterprises BMI)

Born in Arkansas, Gene was a truck driver by day and a singer and DJ by night. In 1953, he was DJ’ing over KRSC in Seattle, WA and appearing on Seattle’s « Junior Ranch Show ». He was signed to Vogue Records in 1953 and had at least one release (Vogue #1022 – « So Do I » / ???). Billboard thought it routine, but then they weren’t always right.

By 1956, Billboard finds him recording the disc above. Again, they are not glowing in their praise, but as I haven’t heard it, I can’t say if they’re right or not.

BIG STATE RECORDS 592 ROLAND (R.A.) FAULK

468 Third St, Port Acres, TXbig state 592-a (78) roland (R.A.) Faulk my baby's gone

Oct 56  (BMI Clearance on 11th January 1957)

45-592-A – You’ll Never Know

(R A Faulk)   (Starrite BMI)

45-592-B – My Baby’s Gone

(R A Faulk)   (Starrite BMI)

big state 592-b (78) roland (R.A.) Faulk you'll never know

The A side is a nice typical Texas honky-tonk / hillbilly song. Flip side is a thunderous rocker with heavy double bass and biting guitar. One of the best examples of the Starday rockabilly sound. The ending of the song is one of the most chaotic pieces of music every pressed into shellac as the musicians don’t seem to know where to end. So they all seem to try to end at once with little success. (Sadly, nobody seems to have signalled to the bass player they’re stopping!). This makes the side even better for it in my opinion.

Both Roland and his brother (Autry) were veterans of the Port Arthur, TX scene. (Port Acres is slightly west of Port Arthur). Kirby London recorded one of Roland’s songs on D 1174.

This disc was pressed on both 45 and 78rpm formats.

LUCKY 593 Northwest Troubadors (Oct 1956)

Hey Mister Copper

Jolly Old Fellow

Untraced

STARDAY RECORDS 594 DOROTHY BLAKLEY

Oct 56  (BMI Clearance on 4th January 1957)

45-594-A – Piano Bells (ST-2658)

(Blakley)   (Starrite BMI)

45-594-B – Yodelin’ Ivory Waltz (ST-2659)

(Blakley)   (Starrite BMI)

More ivory tickling from Dorothy. This disc was even assigned Starday Matrix numbers. ST-2658 was reissued on Starday EP 295 as « Raggin’ The Piano« , while ST-2659 was retitled « Tickle The Ivories« .

BIG STATE RECORDS 595 JIMMY SIMPSON and his Oilfield Boyssimpson

Box 1113, Greggton, TX

Nov 56  (BMI clearance on 11 Jan 57)

45-595-A – Can I Come Home

(Jack Rhodes / Jimmy Simpson)   (Starrite BMI)

45-595-B – Memories Of You

(Jack Rhodes / Jimmy Simpson)   (Starrite BMI)

Jimmy D Simpson was born on 24th March 1928 in Sullivan Hollow, near Ashland City, TN. After stints in the Army (and Navy and the Paratroopers), he moved to Robert Lee, TX (near San Angelo) with his wife and made a living as a pipeliner. He became a DJ over KERC (Eastland, TX) and sang at the Big D Jamboree in Dallas. A career as an artist for Republic Records was cut short by the labels bankruptcy. He also recorded on Hidus Records (owned by Bill & Buddy Holman) based in a jewelry store in Springfield, TN. See in this site for his full story, using the « research » button top-right.

big state 595-a jimmy simpson can I come homebig state 595-b jimmy simpson memories of you

Before he took off for Alaska as a contractor, he teamed up with Jack Rhodes and found himself on this release. The A side is bordering on rockabilly; nice vocals and a fine guitar dragging the band along at a fair clip. There’s a steel guitar adding some nice fills in the background and it shares the solos with the guitar. Flip side is a ballad. These were recorded at a West Monroe, Louisiana radio station. Same session that produced Simpson’s Jiffy single.

STARDAY RECORDS 596 TRUITT FORSE

Nov 56

45-596-A – Chicken Bop

(Forse)   (Starrite BMI)

45-596-B – Doggone Dame

(Forse)   (Starrite BMI)

A monster, 2-sided rockabilly killer from Truitt, (Donald Truitt Forse), a cousin of Beamon Forse (See Rodney 514, « Starday Custom » part 1, in this site). A side is a fast guitar-led rocker with some nice rinky-dink piano. Truitt belts out both sides with gusto (as Billboard might have said) and the biting guitar solos remind me of Hal Harris on high-octane caffeine. Flip is slower, bluesier but not in the least inferior to the topside. Truitt  had some ’60s / ’70s C&W singles out under the name Don Force.

starday 596-a truitt forse chicken bopstarday 596-b truitt forse doggone dame


PEACH RECORDS 597 LEON HOLMES and his Georgia Ramblers

Box 111, Jefferson, GA

Nov 56  (BMI clearance on 11th Jan 57)

45-597-A – She’s My Baby

(Leon Holmes)   (Starrite BMI)

LEON HOLMES and JOHNNY GARRISON and the Georgia Ramblers

45-597-B – You’re Not Mine At All

(Leon Holmes)   (Starrite BMI)

Possibly one of my favourite discs in this series. Great stop-start vocals through the verses with a nice hint of rock-a-billy mumbling through the choruses! But it’s the guitar breaks that have always grabbed my attention (for obvious reasons I guess). Slightly understated with a smattering of Carl Perkins with a lovely cascade of notes at the end. It sounds to me that right at the end of the song, the guitarist must hit his pick-up switch by accident as the tone changes slightly. I could probably listen to this all day and not get bored. In fact, sometimes I think I do!

peach 597-a leon holmes she's my babypeach 597-a leon holmes she's my baby

Leon appears later in this series on Starday Records and also again on Peach Records. Perhaps he was a Georgia native.  Not heard the flip, but even if it was a ballad, I’d probably like it!

ROCK-IT RECORDS 598 GENE TERRY and his Kool Kats

Port Arthur, TX

Nov 56  (BMI clearance on 11 Jan 57)

45-598-A – The Woman I Love

(Kid Murdock / Lila Hargiss)   (Starrite BMI)

45-598-B – Tip, Tap And Tell me

(Kid Murdock / Lila Hargiss)   (Starrite BMI)

rock-it 598a gene terry The woman I loverock-it 598-b gene terry Tip, tap and tell me

Gene Terry was born Terry Gene DeRouen in Lafayette, LA on January 7th 1940, but raised in Port Arthur, TX, where his main musical influence growing up was his father and grandfather performing Cajun songs. He also attended house and barn dances with his uncle, R. C. DeRouen, a Cajun musician. His uncle taught him how to play guitar and eventually Gene accompanied him on stage. Gene formed his first band, the Kool Kats, in the mid-’50s, doing mainly country and western songs but they gravitated toward rock and roll, eventually changing their name to The Downbeats. Gradually rhythm and blues began to enter the band’s repertoire as Gene became influenced by Little Richard, Elvis Presley and local KTRM deejay J. P. « the Big Bopper » Richardson. Word spread to Lake Charles, LA gaining the attention of local club owners and a five year contract with Goldband Records. Gene Terry and the Down Beats recorded several singles for Goldband including classic « Cindy Lou« .

Top side is a fast rocker with a nice long guitar solo (although he seems to have not been expecting the first part of the solo because he’s a little under-recorded). Flip is more mid paced with a nod towards « Heartbreak Hotel« . Awesome!

HUGHART RECORDS 599 BURT HUGHART

Rt 3, Stigler, OK

Dec 56  (BMI clearance on 11 Jan 57. BB rev = 7 Jan 57)

45-599-A – Our Last Goodbye

(No info)   (No info)

45-599-B – Memories I Can’t Forget

(No info)   (No info)

No info on Hughart, nor have I seen or heard the record.

ALABAMA GOSPEL RECORDS 600 TOM HARMON TRIO

AL

Dec 56  (BMI clearance on 11 Jan 57)

45-600-A – My Secret Affair

(No info)   (No info)

45-600-B – Get Away, Satan

(No info)   (No info)

I’ve still yet to see or hear this disc.

As for the previous Starday custom series, a generous use has been made of Malcolm Chapman’s excellent blogsite « Starday customs » (just do search through google). My thanks to him, reprinted with permission. All label scans were taken from his site.

early May 2011 fortnight’s favourites

Howdy folks. We begin in Texas (Marshall) with the energetic duet MACK & GWEN for « Baby I Want Another Date With You » – could be from 1959-60 on the Phil label. Then JOHNNY BROWN on the Big State label (El Paso, Texas) for the fabulous « Shame » (3 steel solos!), vocal assured by « Sammy » (Sammy Smith is the songwriter)

phil 1200 mac & gwen

Big State 718 Johnny Brown Shame

This is a very special feature. I’ve noticed a singer from Georgia, CLYDE BEAVERS, who sounded interesting. First he appeared on the famous STARDAY CUSTOM serie (he gave his own state as label, GEORGIA) as a Hillbilly Bopper in 1955; he pursued his carreer on other labels, finally hitting a bit on Mercury in 1957 with « Crying For My Baby« . Constant quality of his recordings. Hence 4 tracks by him in chronological order.

532B (Georgia) Clyde beavers - my baby is gonetempwood 1039 clyde beavers still loving you

mercury 71185 beavers

The seventh track is a favourite of mine. Alexander « Papa » Lightfoot cut the wild (raucous vocal + harmonica) « Wine, Women And Whiskey » in New Orleans, added by a guitar player (Guitar Gable) and  just a drummer in 1952. What a sound, what a savagery! Imperial label.

lightfoot2

Papa Lightfoot

imperial 5289 papa lightfoot wine

Enjoy every tune, folks! Comments welcome!