early May 2015 fortnight’s favorites

First I offer RED LEWIS on Kasko 1643 (Santa Claus, Indiana) for « I’ll move along ». Strong lead guitar and a melodic steel solo. DrunkenHobo, do you know something more about this record?

kasko 1643
« I’ll move along«  download

 

 

 

 

Then we’ll turn to a talented artist who deserved much more fame than he’s got during his 2 or 3 years tenure at RCA-Victor Records. Born in 1925, he was noted, after his discharge from U.S. Marine, by A&R man Steve Sholes. So EDDIE MARSHALL cut 9 good singles between 1950 and 1952.
His first, « The Tom Cat blues » (RCA 48-0357), recorded in NYC in May 1950, had Tony Matola on lead guitar, a fiddle, a steel who does a fine job and a bass, and as waited, is a medium-paced bluesy number. An organ comes in the background for good effect.

« The Tom Cat blues« download
rca 48-0357 tom cat blues

eddie marshall pic
In December 1950, he cut the already little classic « Coffee, cigarettes and tears » (21-0413) known by Charlie « Peanut » Faircloth [see a recent Fortnight’s favorites to hear the latter’s version]. His version is jazzy and lot more faster than Faircloth’s. Very nice fiddle.
«  »Coffee, cigarettes and tears« download

In December 1951, he cut his teeth on Rodney Morris ‘ « Mobilin baby of mine »(20-4661), with sound effects, with a very nasal voice and new : a piano backing. Same tune was revived January 1952 on the West coast for Capitol (#2075) by Gene O’Quin. I include Gene’s version for comparison.
rca 20-4661 mobilin baby of mine
download

Marshall retired from business afterwards to deal with his family.
Gene O’Quin « Mobilin’ baby of mine« download
bb 24-5-52

gene o'quin

Gene O’Quin

Finally from California on the Big State label (# 101), GRADY ROLLINS and the filthy « Spit-toon song », with steel effect and harmonica, as a sequel to « Chew tobacco rag ».
download
big state 101 - grady rollins
Enjoy the selections ! Some info was taken for Eddie Marshall from Paul Vidal’s BigVJamboree.blogspot site.

Gene O’Quin, the Hometown Jamboree « Problem child » (1949-1955)

He was a fantastic little guy. Gene could have been one of the biggest things on television. He could’ve had his own show nationally and been one of the biggest artists on TV. But you couldn’t O'QuinPicturedepend on Gene. He’s be liable to be out at the horses races, you know, instead of being at the station, where he should be…but you couldn’t keep from loving the little guy.” (Speedy West)

Because he didn’t seem to take himself too seriously as an artist, he excelled at good-timey romps, as Boogie Woogie Fever, Texas Boogie,  and was not totally convincing on tearjerkers. He was a major star on the West Coast for several years, with high-profile radio and television status on Cliffie Stone’s Hometown Jamboree. The musicians who backed him were the top ones of the West Coast: Speedy West, Jimmy Bryant, Billy Liebert, Cliffie Stone. He enjoyed only minor hits, like his cover of Hank Locklin’s “Pin Ball Millionaire”, but he sold consistently enough for Capitol to keep him around for four years in a very competitive and changing  scene – surprisingly, given his undoubted feel for hillbilly boogies, it was the emergence of rock’n’roll that really knocked him out.   (suite…)