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early July 2012 fornight’s favourites
juil 3rd, 2012 by xavier

Howdy folks, we embark for a new serie of obscure hillbilly bop records. TED WEST is not an unknown artist. He cut 1952 for Republic in Nashville the fine « She Bent My Pole » and the equally good (with sound effects) « Parking Worries » (see in the site the article on Republic Records, from July 2011). He cut two sessions in 1953-1954 for M-G-M, which I did extract the nice « Call Of The Devil’s Ride » (# 11539) from. Backing accompaniment may be by the Drifting Cowboys. A good shuffler from the days before Nashville was not rotten neither too commercial. Read the rest of this entry »

Jimmy Walker, the « Detour » man – a very underrated hillbilly artist (1945-1965)
juin 22nd, 2012 by xavier

Earnest Earl Walker was born in Mason County, West Virginia on December 18th, 1915, a few miles from the river town of Point Pleasant. Having been reared in his home locals and also in the Pittsburgh area, he worked as a riverboat man in the late ’30s before being drafted into the military. Read the rest of this entry »

early June 2012 fortnight’s favorites: the « Move It On Over » saga and a late ’50s Texas hillbilly bopper
juin 1st, 2012 by xavier

Howdy folks! This time I managed to post 8 tunes, instead of the usual 6. I must say: the matter was significant with the « Move It On Over » story, a tune frequently covered over the years. I picked up 4 versions, ranging from 1947 to the ’60s. Read the rest of this entry »

Late April 2012 fortnight’s favorites
avr 15th, 2012 by xavier

Howdy folks! Tired of spams changing my mailbox into a litterbin (an average more than 200 a day) , I put a very efficient filter. Indeed maybe some of you who wanted to post constructive comments cannot do it anymore. Don’t get rid of the situation and try again!

I ecountered problems of access to the site. Now everything is all right…

Ready for a new batch of bopping Hillbilly and Rockabilly? This time I concentrate myself on obscure artists..So I feel uninspired, and my comments will be minimal, sorry.

From Texas and Fort Worth comes RAYMOND PARISH for the fine medium hillbilly bop, including fiddle, « I’m Packin’ Up  And Moving out » on the High Line label (# 102). Don’t know when it was recorded, I’d assume late ’50s.

Let’s turn back East: Natchez, Mississipi. GRAY MONTGOMERY offers a bordering Rockabilly tune, with « Right Now » on the Beagle label (# 101). It’s even billed « Rockin vocal ».

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Later – 1963 – a Starday custom record from one of the Carolinas: Flop 1012 and the medium « Got It Made (in The Shade)« . Here LES WALDROOP is backed only by bass and lead guitar: Wade & Mickey, as shown on the label.

1961. JIMMY WELCH does a fast country-rock tune, « Searight Blues » on the Alabama based A-B-S label (# 146).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the Mac label (unknown place), we have got now BOB ROARK & the Country Band for the fine melodic  » The Road To Your Heart » (# 467).

Finally the classic Nashville sound in Hillbilly bop, from April 1953: TOM ANDERSON, « As The Hands Go ‘Round The Clock » (M-G-M 11589).

 

A.C. « Buck » Griffin, classic Texas Hillbilly bop and Rockabilly (1954-1956) on Lin and M-G-M
nov 13th, 2011 by xavier

One of the first articles I ever wrote was about rockabilly/honky tonk singer Buck Griffin, which in turn led me to my proud association with Joe Leonard. Griffin was a great artist who unfortunately struck out before making the major leagues, despite going to bat for Lin, MGM and Holiday Inn between 1954 and 1962. He tried his hand at both country and the newly emerging rockabilly style but was destined to remain relatively unknown.

pub 1956

Born Albert Clyde Griffin in Corsicana, Texas on 23rd February 1923, his formative years were spent moving throughout Oklahoma and Kansas. Whilst still in his teens, A.C., as he was known, formed and fronted a country band with three schoolmates. After leaving school and holding down jobs on pipelines and oil fields, he started to play the local honky tonks and eventually got a gig on radio station WKY.

Throughout the forties and fifties radio had bred many stars who once they were groomed and polished, moved on to better things, leaving the station manager to find a replacement. WKY probably had this in mind when they copyrighted the name Chuck Wyman and had our Mr. Griffin use it for all his broadcasts. Once he left the station, singers like Paul Brawner and Pronger Suggs took over the role and the sponsors continued backing the shows. The public must surely have noticed whenever a new Chuck arrived, but after a hard days toil in the cotton fields or rounding up cattle, I don’t suppose they cared. Read the rest of this entry »

early December 2010 fortnight’s favourites
déc 1st, 2010 by xavier

Howdy folks! Here are my ‘new’ favourite tunes of  early this month. As usual I try to give you oddities to illustrate the music, although lacking of inspiration and enthusiasm this time!

Red and Lige, The TURNER BROTHERS, were a duet group from Tennessee. I don’t know if they were related to the more famous brothers, Zeke and Zeb (King and Bullet labels). They offer here a strong Country-boogie with   »Honky Tonk Mama » on the Radio Artist label (the one which issued Jimmie Skinner first sides). Circa 1950.

turner brothers CDradio art.243 turner PECK TOUCHTON, a native of Texas, had a solitary release on Sarg (« You’ve Changed Your Tune« ). He also recorded for Pappy Daily’s Starday label, without seeing any issue, following a mixing of label stickers during a car wreck! The whole story was told by Andrew Brown in his excellent site, Wired For Sound. See it here:

http://wired-for-sound.blogspot.com/search?q=peck+touchton

Touchton’s record, « Let Me Catch My Breath » was finally issued under the name of George Jones (Starday 160).

Starday160 touchton

Out of Texas or West Louisiana, and at one time associated as a singer with Bill Nettles, DANNY DEDMON had records as early as 1947 on Imperial. Here is his « Hula Hula Woogie« , typical Texas Honky-tonk of the late Forties, with a touch of Western swing. imperial 8019 danny dedmonThe Rhythm Ramblers were actually Nettles’ band.

George and Earl pic

George McCormick (he had discs on M-G-M, for example, « Fifty-Fifty Honky Tonkin’ Tonight ») and Earl Aycock teamed as GEORGE & EARL in 1956, and had a string of Rockabilly releases on the Mercury label. I’ve chosen one of their most dynamic sides, « Done Gone« . Nashville musicians behind them. The duet folded shortly afterwards.

mercury 70852 george Out of Nashville came CLAY EAGER on the Republic label. Although he was a celebrity as D.J. in the St.Louis/St.Paul, MO, area, he had cut this fine « Bobbie Lou » in Nashville. clay eager - bobbie louWe finish with the wild, rasping young ETTA JAMES on the West Coast. « Tough Lover » is backed by the ubiquitous Maxwell Davis.

etta james modern tough lover

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