late January 2012 fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks! This is maybe the last fortnight I’ll be posting before mid-February, as I am moving; so all CDs and material are stored. ’till then, another batch of goodies.

Who came first? I’d assume JOHNNY BOND, who penned « Drink Up And Go Home » along with Joe Maphis – whose version was untraceable. Instead I found 1955-56 FREDDIE HART‘s, the demo by CARL PERKINS (cut 1957, with brother Jay B. on duet vocal, unissued until the ’80s), then a ’60s version by the Human Jukebox, SLEEPY LA BEFF. Hear them 3 versions, whose I include the lyrics below of.

You sit there a-crying, crying in your beer                          finn 1690 sleepy la beff Drink up and go home (1963)
You say you’ve got troubles, my friend listen here
Don’t tell me your troubles got enough of my own
Be thankful you’re living, drink up and go home

I’m fresh out of prison, six years in the pen
Lost my wife and family, no one to call friend
Don’t tell me your troubles, got enough of my own
Be thankful you’re living, drink up and go home

Back there sets a blind man, so blind he can’t see
Yet he’s not complaining, why should you or me?
Don’t tell me your troubles, got enough of my own
Be thankful you’re living, drink up and go home

Then we go to a certain HAROLD ZAHNER, backed by Johnny Smith and the Missouri Tsun-nell j08W-0377 bill chambers She's treatin' me badwo, on the Missouri Smith label, who offers a good version of « Shake Baby Shake« . Is this the Rock’n’Roll classic (Johnny O’Keefe, Jesse Lee Turner or the Killer), I don’t know. Full of rural energy anyhow. BILL CHAMBERS do come with the good « She’s Treatin’ Me Bad » on the Sun-Nell label (a RCA custom pressing of 1958), and we come to an end with VIRGEL BOZMAN (also BOZEMAN) for the fine little classic « Blues For Oklahoma » on his own O.T. label (# 109).

This O.T. label was originally based in Westlake, a small town on Highway 10 in the Southwestern corner of Louisiana. The initials O.T. stood for Oklahoma Tornadoes, a group run by Virgel that had recorded for Bill Quinn’s Gold Star label. Among the members of this short lived, but important band, were Bennie Hess, and Cajun fiddler extraordinaire Floyd Le Blanc. . His brother, Harmon recorded Rockabilly on the Texas Sarg label. Another Bozman O.T. release, when the label was relocated to San Antonio, is the fine, more Western Swing in style, « Troubles, Troubles » (# 113), backed by the Circle C Boys. It’s driven along by a bass player who enjoys himself enormously.

smith 17318B harold zahner shake baby shakeot 109A (78) virgel bozman Blues for oklahoma

JOHNNY BOND

Johnny Bond had several successful facets to a career that lasted over 30 years. As a member of the Jimmy Wakely Trio and as a session musician, he was an important support musician in dozens of B Westerns, working alongside Wakely, Tex Ritter, and Johnny Mack Brown. As a songwriter, he was responsible for several compositions that became country standards, including « Cimarron, » « I Wonder Where You Are Tonight, » « Conversation With a Gun, » « Tomorrow Never Comes, » and « I’ll Step Aside, » which became hits for everyone from Billy Vaughn & His Orchestra to Johnny Rodriguez. He also contributed mightily to the recorded music of Wakely, Ritter, and other country stars of the 1940s and 1950s. And his own recordings — which included work with such luminaries as Merle Travis — were popular from the 1940s onward, and included several hits, but it wasn’t until the 1960s that he had the biggest record of his career, « Ten Little Bottles. » (suite…)