Late January 2017 bopping hillbilly and rockabilly fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! This is the second 2017 fortnight, that of late January. It will cover very various styles, be it hillbilly boppers, country rockers or rockabillies, even one Bluegrass bopper, from 1955 to 1961.

First an uptempo atmospheric bluesy rockabilly from Bald Knob, AR, on the CKM label (# 1000) by BUDDY PHILLIPS with Rocking Ramblers, « River boat blues » from 1956 (valued at $ 100-125). I enclose for comparison the original version of the song by ALTON GUYON and his Boogie Blues Boys on the Judsonia, AR. Arkansas label (# 553), a Starday custom from 1956. This time the song is taken at a slow, lazy, bluesy pace – fine fiddle (valued at $ 150-200). Back to Buddy Phillips for the CKM flipside « Coffee baby » (written by Alton Guyon), less fast than the « River boat blues » side, but good and bluesy. Pity that Phillips disappeared afterwards.

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Buddy Phillips, « River boat blues »

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Buddy Phillips, « Coffee baby« 

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Alton Guyon « River boat blues« 

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Memphian EDDIE BOND (1933-2013) had many strings to his bow : band leader, D.J., radio station manager, night club owner, chief police and editor of an entertainment newpaper (pheww..). Here are his first sides on the Ekko label (# 1015) cut July 1955 in Nashville with Hank Garland on lead guitar and Jerry Byrd on steel. « Talking of the wall » and « Double duty lovin’ » (written by Vernon Claud, later on Decca with « Baby’s gone ») are uptempo Rockabilly/Boppers, very ordinary, which of course went nowhere. They are valued $ 100-150. Later in 1956, Bond recorded a famous string of classic Rockabilly releases on the Mercury label, « Rockin’ daddy » (# 70826) (the original being cut late ’55 by Sonny Fisher – Starday 179) is the most well-known.

« Talking off the wall »

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« Double duty lovin‘ »

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ekko-1015-eddie-bond-double-duty-lovinTwo issues on the Starday associated Dixie label from the late Fifties to the early Sixties. ELMER BRYANT on Dixie 906 from 1960 (value $ 75-100) delivers the cheerful bopper « Gertie’s carter broke », which has a Louisiana bouquet, with fine fiddle and steel. The medium-paced flipside « Will I be ashamed tomorrow », although very good and sincere, is more conventional country.

« Gertie’s Carter broke »

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« Will I be ashamed tomorrow« 

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The other Dixie discussed is Dixie 1170 from 1961 by LITTLE CHUCK DANIELS : « I’ve got my brand on you » is a bit J. Cash-styled, an uptempo bass chords guitar opus with good effect on voice : honest Country rocker. I add by Daniels his issue on Dixie 1153, « Night shift », same style.

« I’ve got my brand on you »

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« Night shift« 

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A plaintive Hillbilly now by BILL STUCKER vocal – Tune Twisters on the Indiana Ruby label (# 430) , « I go on pretending » from 1956 : a nice discreet guitar, some snare drums.

« I go on pretending »


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ROLLIE WEBBER from California was a part of the now well-known Bakersfield sound, and had issues on Pep and Virgelle among other labels. Here he offers « Painting the town » on the Tally label (#150), a fine bopper with prominent steel ( sounds like Ralph Mooney).

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« Painting the town »

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Finally from Detroit on Fortune 187 from 1957 : BUSTER TUNER & his Pinnacle Mt. Boys for « That old heartbreak express ». It’s a bluegrass bopper, Turner is in fine voice, and mandolin to the fore.

« That old heartbreak express »

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Buster Turner on dobro

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That’s it, folks !

Sources : YouTube (Dixie issues) ; my own researches ; RCS for Eddie Bond ; Malcolm Chapman’s blogsite (« Starday customs ») for Alton Guyon.

Early January 2017 bopping and rocking R&B fortnight favorites

This is the first fortnight’s favorites section for 2017, and we begin with a curious record : by CLIFF FERRÉ, « A cocky cowboy » on the Kem label (California). It’s a fast Western swing flavored number.kem-129-cliff-ferre-a-cocky-cowboy

« A cocky cowboy »

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From then the »Hillbilly Boogie » theme. First king-527-delmore-hillbilly-boogieby its creators, the DELMORE BROTHERS who released their versionbillboard-king-527

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in March 1946 (# 527), and which everybody knows. Strong similarity with Arthur Smith‘s « Guitar boogie » from 1945. Next « Hillbilly boogie » (apart from Jerry Irby on M-G-M from 1948, and which is an entirey different track) was done by a Tennessean, ANDY WILSON on the Dot label (# 1127) : an energetic perfomance including steel and piano. Its flipside, « Lonesome for my baby », is equally good, although more melodic.

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Andy Wilson: « Hlllbilly boogie »

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« Lonesome for my baby »

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RAY WHITLEY (1901-1979) seemingly on the East coast is present with two tracks : « Jukebox cannonball » on Cowboy # 301 from 1947 : a lovely piece of Bop, which reminds me of Hank Williams‘ early sides. One composer name, that of Rusty Keefer, brings to Philadelphia and Bill Haley’s version on Essex 311 (January 1952). A long biography of Ray Whitley is to be found on YouTube: Johnn Maddy chain.

I added a reference version : JESSE ROGERS (cousin to Jimmie) released « Jukebox cannonball » too on Arcade 147 in January 1957.cowboy-301-ray-whitley-jukebox-cannonball
Ray Whitley « Jukebox cannonball »arcade-143-jesse-rogers-jukebox-cannonball

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Jesse Rogers « Jukebox cannonball »

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Whitley also had in 1949 another great number, « You’re barkin’ up the wrong tree now », on Apollo 195. An insistant crazy fiddle rivalling with an excellent guitar over a warm voice. This was a Hank Willams/Fred Rose compostion. At least the title was renewed in December 1956 in the hands of DON WOODY (Decca 30277) who takes his song at a brisk speed for a true Rockabilly classic, full of amusing barks. Great guitar of Grady Martin.apollo-195-ray-whitley-youre-barkin-upthe-wrong-tree-now

Ray Whitley « You’re barkin’ up the wrong tree now »

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Don Woody, »You’re barking up the wrong tree »

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On the West coast now with JIMMIE LAWSON. He does a fine shuffler, « Tennessee blues » (Columbia 20477) from July 1947. Much later on the Fable label, in 1957 (# 584) he had « Ole Jack Hammer blues », a strong medium paced rocker with great guitar (Sandy Stanton, owner of Fable records?).

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« Tennessee blues »

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« Ole Jack Hammer blues »

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Finally a R&B rocker by the ‘one-man-band’ JOE HILL LOUIS from Memphis, TN. In 1949 he released « A jumpin’ and a shufflin’ », a song obviously cut for dancers (Columbia 30182). 

« A jumpin’ and a’ shufflin’ »

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That’s it for this time, folks, pheeew !(several hours of work and pleasure mixed to set this feature up )

Sources : 45cat, 78rpm world for Ray Whitley ; YouTube for Joe Hill Louis and Andy Wilson ; Willem Agenant’s « Columbia 20000 serie » for Jimmie Lawson. Also Roots Vinyl Guide sometimes.

BIG JEFF BESS – Tales From Ten-E-Cee! « Juke Box Boogie » (1947-1952)

BIG JEFF BESS – Tales from Ten-E-Cee !   bess-seul

(by Michael Cocksedge – all additional content in brackets and italics by Bopping’s editor)

On to you, Mick!

Movie star, Radio star, Recording Star, Nashville lounge bar co-owner …..you name it and Big Jeff has done it and done it in style .

Born on 2nd September 1920 as Grover Franklin Bess in Ashland, just north west of Nashville. At the age of nineteen he married the girl from the next village called Emily Ediker . He started playing guitar in the late 30’s and by 1940 he was playing with ‘Roy Lucas & his Rhythm Rangers’ live on Radio Station W.L.A.C .

Jeff was never called to army service in WWII due to high blood pressure and so was working during the day during the war years at a bomb factory in mid Tennessee and by night working on Radio and various live shows and State Fairs .

From the mid 1940’s Jeff’s career is hard to establish, he was certainly on the rosters of various Radio Staions including Harrisburg W.E.B.Q , Knoxville W.N.O.X and at W.S.I.X where he could be found in the line up with ‘Goober and his Kentuckians’ plus many other stations. So by 1946 the 6ft 2 BIG Jeff Bess and his new band ‘The Radio Playboys’ had returned to W.L.A.C in Nashville and started a regular twice daily radio show.

Jeff’s early ‘Radio Playboys’ line-up included future stars like Grady Martin playing Fiddle (of course Grady was starting to make waves with his guitar playing and would go on to be a major picker in the country music scene), Lucky Strickland playing Accordion, Hillous Butrum on Doghouse Bass, Tommy Neblett on Guitar and Jeff handling acoustic Guitar and vocals. Benny Martin (no relation) was to take over Fiddle duties after Grady Martin left. Around this time the band were joined by Jack Henderson and many more musicians from all over the state.

It was during the late 40’s that his marriage to Emily had broken down and he started dating a certain Hattie Louise AKA ‘Tootsie’ (they would be married in 1949) and already Jeff was venturing into running bars and Club ownership as a way of making extra money.

By the late 40’s Jeff had lost his band so he recruited a local combo called ‘The Eagle Rangers’ to become his new ‘Radio Playboys’ the line-up was now Billy Robinson on Steel, his Brother Floyd Robinson on Lead Guitar [could he be the Floyd Robinson who later teamed up with Autry Inman for the “Jack & Daniel” duet, who cut 1953-54 several discs on Decca?], Jerry Rivers on Fiddle and Jack Boles on the upright Bass.

Guitarist and singer George McCormick during late 1949 would also join the band. George was raised and lived in the fantastic but gloomy sounding town called ‘Defeated Creek’ and would be another young picker, to go under Jeff’s wing before going on to future solo stardom. [Later on George McCormick went solo in 1953-54 on M-G-M and duetted with Texan Earl Aycock as “George and Earl” in 1955-56 on Mercury – see “Done gone” and their story elsewhere in this blogsite]

So into the 1950’s and Jeff was working hard, regular shows, regular radio slots and club/bar owner, things were starting to take off for Jeff and the Radio Playboys. Their shows were a mix of Hillbilly, folk and some gospel and by all accounts they could raise the roof just about anywhere .

Now Jeff was earning more money in this period than most Opry stars and was very influential in Nashville, BIG Jeff was a BIG deal ! but suprisingly had very little in the way of records released !

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Jeff Bess and another (stage?) line-up of the Radio Playboys

 

Jeff and the Radio Playboys backed Jack Henderson on their first recorded release on ‘Cheker’ # 100 in early 1947 ‘The Tramp On The Street’ / ‘Gonna Give You Back To The Indians’.  Jack took the vocals, Jeff Bess – Acoustic Guitar, Benny Martin – Fiddle, Grady Martin – Lead Guitar and Hillous Butrum on Bass. Grady Martin steals the show with some fine pickin’ on the ‘Indians’ side …..just marvelous !

The first proper Jeff Bess with The Radio Playboys release was in 1947 on ‘Cheker’ # 103 . The line-up was Jeff Bess – Vocals with Jack Henderson – Acoustic Guitar, Benny Martin – Fiddle, Grady Martin – Guitar and Hillous Butrum on Bass. ‘Poppin’ Bubble Gum’ b/w ‘A Kiss And A Memory’ . ‘Poppin’ Bubble Gum’ was a jaunty novelty number with various comic impersonations and was a fun number that folks liked at all his shows. [Original version had been written by Cincinnati guitar virtuoso Zeb Turner and cut by Lonzo & Oscar in July 1947 on RCA-Victor 47-2765. They often performed this song at their Opry appearances].

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Lonzo & Oscar, « Poppin’ Bubble Gum »

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1949 saw a second release but this time on ‘World Records’ # 1520 ‘After We Are Through’, which is a superb mid-tempo slice of hillbilly with lashings of Steel, Fiddle and Banjo, written by Jeff and on the flip again another updated version of ‘Poppin’ Bubble Gum’ [which reminds one of 1950 Billy Briggs’’ hit “Chew Tobacco Rag” on Imperial]. This was the last release on World Records Inc and the line-up on this recording was probably (Photo Below) Jack Boles- Bass, Bob King – Banjo, Bill Robinson (Seated) Steel – Jerry Rivers – Fiddle, Big Jeff Bess – Vocals/Guitar &  Floyd Robinson – Guitar ( Announcer in this photo is Bill Stamps)

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« After we are through » (World version)

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« Poppin’ Bubble Gum » (World version)

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Through this period according to various band members and promoters, Jeff was a great entertainer, a really good show man, but like a lot of stars of this period he loved a drink and he also loved the women ….. a lot !

Jeff and the boys had been playing the Tennessee State Fair which was re-introduced after the war in 1947, Jeff and the Radio Playboys always played the Beer Garden area and were sponsored by ‘Ma n’ Pa Hom Bru Beer’, so over time they worked into the routine comedy sketches and songs about this wonderful beer. It was around the 1950 State Fair that somebody had the idea of cutting a record to sell at the fair. The two songs ‘Ten – E -Cee –Hom – Bru’ and ‘Hom- Bru Boogie’ were recorded in the studios of W.L.A.C . Jeff Bess – Vocals/Guitar. Probably the Radio Playboys were Ed Hyde – Fiddle, George McCormick – Lead Guitar, Dwain Birdwell – Steel Guitar and Jack Boles – Bass . The records were sold only at the fair in 1950, how many were cut is unclear, but the label design is basic and there is no mention of the band on the label; this is an extremely rare 78 rpm (see my copy pictured below), imagine buying this in a beer garden booze up at the State Fair in 1950 and then imagine every copy made it home without a crack or breakage after an all day session on the Hom Bru ……very unlikely indeed !

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« Hom-Bru Boogie »

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« Ten-E-Cee Hom-Bru« 

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These two Hom Bru, foot tapping, booze filled hillbilly tunes are simply wonderful!

New record company ‘Dot Records’ was looking for new acts for the big battle against the well-established labels in the Country/Hillbilly field in 1950. Big Jeff knew owner Randy Wood through radio station work and was duly signed up. Jeff saw five releases on Dot with some success . Dot # 1004 in the spring of 1950 was the first and was a tune geared at a popular money making market ‘Juke Box Boogie’ / ‘You Talk In Your Sleep’ . Juke Box Boogie was a superb Guitar driven honkytonker and jumps and bops around for sure.[heavily bootlegged as ’45rpm and yellow wax those days]

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Billboard August 15, 1950

« Juke Box Boogie« dot-1004a-jeff-juke-box-bogie

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« You Talk In Your Sleep »
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The second show on Dot was nearly a year in the making but boy it was worth the wait; Dot 1058  ‘Step It Up And Go’ / ‘After We Are Through’  the A & B side are pure magic and still sounds as fresh today as they did in 1951, you get it all, Johnny Maddox on piano, superb guitar by George McCormick and wonderful steel by Johnny Sibert make this a classic of early 50’s Hillbilly boogie. [The “Step it up and go” saga was told elsewhere in this blogsite since its beginnings in the ‘30s until its last known ‘50s renewal. Note that Big Jeff paid homage with the credits to the originator Blind Boy Fuller].

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Billboard August 26, 1951

« Step it up and go« dot-1058a-jeff-step-it-up-and-go

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« After we are through » (Dot version, 1951)
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A further two releases on Dot in 1951  ‘Dot # 1064 ‘ Lifetime To Regret’ [original version issued Febr. 1948 by blind songwriter and ballad singer Leon Payne on Bullet 641]/ ‘Fast Women Slow Horses And Wine’, sung by George McCormick, and into 1952: Dot # 1088  ‘Move On Baby’ / ‘I’m In Love Dear With Thee’ did little to make a dent in the Country charts and were just decent country tunes which when you listen to them today are really top songs and are just wonderful to listen to.

Leon Payne, « Lifetime to regret« bullet-649a-leon-payne-lfetime-to-regret

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dot-1064b-jeff-lifetime« Lifetime to regret »(Dot 1064)dot-1064a-jeff-fast-women

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« Fast women, slow horses and wine » 

« Fast women, slow horses and wine »


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« Move on baby« 

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« I’m in love dear with thee« 


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Billboard March 15, 1952

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The final outing on Dot # 1096 was actually sung by a certain George Mack and on the B side as George Mack & Jeff Bess. George Mack is actually Jeff’s Radio Playboy Guitarist George McCormick! George sang solo on ‘I Courted An Angel’ and sang as a duet with Jeff on the flip ‘I Don’t Talk To Strangers’ , both songs were written by Jeff and are top notch songs and are geared towards looking for the new Hank Williams star. It is unclear why they used the name George Mack on the label listing, maybe McCormick was not Country enough! who knows but it doesn’t matter, a great final release by Jeff and the Radio Playboys .

This were the last recordings in the 1950’s by Jeff and The Radio Playboys. Jeff did not see another release until the early 1970’s on Delta and Fiddle & Bow.

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courtesy JIM NELSON

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courtesy JIM NELSON

« I courted an angel« (vocal George McCormick)

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« I don’t talk to strangers » (vocal Big Jeff and George)

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1959 saw Jeff and wife Tootsie purchased a club in Nashville called ‘Mom’s’ which they renamed ‘Tootsie’s Orchard Lounge’ and was the place to be if you were a name in Country music in Nashville. Jeff ventured into the movies around this time where he had small appearances in ‘Face In The Crowd’ and in 1960 in ‘Wild River’ . By 1960 he and ‘Tootsie’ had divorced and she kept the club and Jeff would by the mid 60’s become a real life Sheriff in the Tennessee Police Department where he would stay until his retirement in 1980.

Big Jeff Bess passed away in August 1998. Jeff never saw massive music fame, but he left us some fantastic songs and if you listen to the Bear Family CD ‘Tennessee Home Brew’ and the Radio show tunes you can hear Big Jeff’s infectious laugh before and after every song, a true country star a true Radio Playboy !

 

 

 

 

Early December 2016 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hi ! Everybody.
Ready for this new Fortnight ? From New Orleans on the Meladee label (run by Mel Mallory – I wonder if he launched other labels), here’s JACK WYATT & his Bayou Boys and the fine, uptempo « Why did you let me love you ». Fiddle and steel all long the tune. Actually Meladee issued also discs by Gene Rodrigue («   Jolie fille ») Roy Perkins (« You’re on my mind ») and Jeff Daniels (« Daddy-o rock »). Wyatt had another record on the Kuntry label (# 1000) : « I taught her how to love », a good uptempo, out of J. D. Miller studio in Crowley, La., according to « Jamil » as publishing house.

« Why did you let me love you? »

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I taught her how to love »

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meladee-104-jack-wyatt-why-did-you-let-me-love-youkuntry-1000-jack-wyatt-i-taught-her-how-to-loveWay up north in Detroit, MI and on the Hi-Q label (a sublabel to Fortune), the out-and-out rocker « It’s all your fault » by FARRIS WILDER. He didn’t cut any other disc to my knowledge.

hq-11-farris-wilder-its-all-your-fault« it’s all your fault »

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« You promised me » is the next song by PAUL BLUNT on Bullet 674, backed by a Californian outfit, The Frontiersmen, later set-up in Dallas, TX as a house band for Jim Beck . Blunt is in good voice and plays apparently steel (he was also a capable pianist who found work with many sessions held at Beck’s, including Ray Price or Charlene Arthur). I have previously posted his very good « Walking upstairs » (Bullet 706) in the April 2013 fortnight’s favorites section.bullet-674-paulblunt-you-promised-me

« You promised me »

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JEAN SHEPARD (born 1933; deceased September 2016) began his career in a duet with Ferlin Huskey, « A dear John letter », a huge hit in 1953 even as a crossover between Country and pop charts. Herself later pursued a solo career. Here’s « Two whoops and a holler » (Capitol 2791, April 1954): a typical Capitol honky tonker with one of the best housebands around in Los Angeles, that of Bill Woods (piano), Lewis Talley (steel), Fuzzy Owen (guitar) and Skeets McDonald on bass. In 1955 Shepard is inducted in the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. All in all she recorded 73 singles !

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Billboard May 5, 1954

jean-shepard-pic-53« Two whoops and a holler »capitol-ep-jean-shepard-anglarescapitol-2791-jean-shepard-two-whoops

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Then the veteran EDDIE DEAN (1907-1999) was more known for his crooning things than boppers. We can however remind of 2 great sides on the Sage label, « Impatient blues » being a fine shuffler (#188), and « Rock & Roll cowboy » (# 226), a rare example of Western swing flavoured Rocker (or the opposite).eddie-dean-pic-grande

« Rock’n’roll cowboy« sages-226-eddie-dean-rr-cowboy

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On a New Jersey label (Red Hed # 1001) we’re going to listen to LES MITCHEM and « How big a vool » (sic), a fast bopper with good steel.from 1959

« How big a fool« red-hed-1001-les-mitchem-how-big-a-vool

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From Cincinnati, OH, I’ve found SYLBIL GIANI in 1958 for « Within these four walls »(Esta 284) : the Lady is in good voice and the band romps along very lovely.

esta-284-sybil-giani-within-these-four-wlls« Within these four walls »

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« I had a dream of you »

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Finally from 1969 (yes!) on the Laurel Leaf label (# 24172), JAMES TUSSEY delivers a strong and solid bopper (drums present) with « I had a dream of you ».

Sources : Kevin Coffey in the « A shot in the dark » boxset ; Praguefrank for several discographical details ; Hillblly-music.com to complete bios ; Youtube.Thanks Dominique ‘Imperial’ Anglares for the rare Jean Shepard EP.
Sorry, I was not able to give more precise info. this time. Will do better next Fortnight !

Early November 2016 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! Hi ! to returning visitors. Here is my choice of bopping billies (and a classic rocking blues) for this fortnight, mainly from the late ’40s.

We begin with JIMMIE SAUL on his own Redskin label out of Detroit, in 1947. His singer Jimmy Franklin, out of West Liberty, KY. (maybe artist with the same name, much later on Drifter, Acorn and M-G-M labels) fronted Saul’s Prairie Drifters for three sides (the 4th being instrumental) cut in Dayton, OH. Redskin 500 revealed « My long tall gal from Tenn. », a fast ditty, very-much over the top jazz tinged opus, comprising either James ‘Chick’ Stripling or Doug Dalton on crazy fiddle, and Jimmie Saul on bass, plus Marvin « Whitey » Franklin on steel. It has been suggested the guitar virtuoso may be Roy Lanham, who had at that time his band the Whippoorwills in Dayton. The second fast song was « Firecracker stomp » (# 501), an instrumental with guitar and bass solos as explosive as its title. Through an arrangement with Bill McCall, owner of 4 * Records in Pasadena, CA., « Firecracker stomp » was reissued twice on 4*. Meanwhile Jimmie Saul had become Jimmie Lane.

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« My long tall gal from Tenn. »4-1630-jimmie-lane-firecracker-stompredskin-501-jimmie-saul-firecracker-stomp

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billboard May 8, 1948

 

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« Firecracker stomp »

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I really don’t know if this is the same man who came on a Waldorf/Top Hit Tunes 11-artists EP (TN 17) in 1958 with covers of respectively Elvis Presley, « I beg of you », and Ricky Nelson, « Waitin’ in school ». It is very doubtful, as his involvement in « Little lover », a teen rocker on Vestal 1906 from 1961 (Birmingham, AL). There was even a Jimmie Lane on Time from Philly. I include Top Hit Tunes and Vestal sides by tame comparison to his earlier sides.

« I beg of you« top-hit-17-jimmy-lane-waitin-in-school

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« Waitin’ in school« 

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« Little lover« 
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We move to Kentucky with EDDIE GAINES, a famous rocker for « Be-bop battlin’ ball » on Summit 101 (1958): the
eddie-gaines-pic-nbflipside « She captured this heart of mine » is a fine country rocker with eddie-gainesprominent mandolin backing, and was reissued the following year on Summit 109. Later on he had a ’45 on Tri-Tone (# 3000/3001 : « Out of gas/I never had it so good ») which was a teener, before becoming a minister.

« She captured this heart of mine« summit-109-eddie-gaines-she-captured

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From the East coast went BILLY STRICKLAND & his Hillbilly Kings for two tracks, the great « Hillbilly wolf » on Sylvan 354, an elusive label which I suspect had something to do with Ben Adelman, from Washington, D.C. Second tune is released on the Hill & Country label (# 103) a sublabel to Apollo : « Baby doll, please come home » has a dynamite steel all along, over a well-assured vocal. Both records were released early in 1949. Strickland also had records on King among others.

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« Hillbilly wolf »

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« Baby doll, please come home« 

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We now come to the lone girl of the selection, COUNTRY GIRL KAY, who may be from Arkansas, hence her « Arkansas boogie » (Whitkay 1001) : a very agile and fine acoustic guitar is the sole instrumentation, and the girl is in good voice ! She also had « Life is not a bed of roses », same style, same label.

« Arkansas boogie« whitkay-1001-ctry-girl-kay-ark-boogie

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And to sum this fortnight’s up, a classic bluesy R&B which deserves no introduction : « Drinkin’ wine spo-dee-o-dee » by its creator « STICK » McGHEE on the Harlem label 1018 (1947). Spare instrumentation (only two guitars), and a lot of fun ! « Drinkin’ wine spo-dee-o-dee« harlem-1018-stick-mcghee-drinkin-wine

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Sources : as usual, many finds on YouTube ; carcitycountry site for the Jimmie Saul/Jimmy Franklin details ; John E. Burton tube for « Stick » McGhee disc ; Cactus, « High on the hop » vol. 3 for Eddie Gaines track.