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early November 2013 fortnight’s favorites
nov 1st, 2013 by xavier

Howdy folks! Many thanks to the 80.852+ visitors of this site since February 2009. May anyone find what he/she searches here in Hillbilly bop and Rockabilly music!

First, a minor classic on the 4 * label (# 1647) from 1955, by the prolific FRANK SIMON, « The West Virginia Country Boy ». Here he does his most famous song, « Sugar plum boogie« , fine boogie guitar, lotsa energy. This is almost Rockabilly in spirit. Without doubt a guy to look for. He even had an LP (late 50s) on Audio-Lab.4 * 1647 franksimon sugar lum boogie

Frank Simon, « Sugar plum boogie » download

Then, again on 4*, two 1957 sides by an otherwise unknown artist to me, JAY  T. STARR (# 1708). First, « Wa-na-chee« , an ethnic Indian Bopper, very solid. The flipside does slow things a bit, but nearly not with « Darker clouds ahead« . A good record.

4* 1708 jay T. Starr wa-na-chee
4 * 1708 jay T. Starr darker clouds ahead

Jay. T. Starr, « Wa-na-chee » download
Jay T. Starr, « Darker clouds ahead »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/4-Jay-T-Starr-Darker-Clouds-Ahead-stereo.mp3download

Way up north (Indianapolis) on the Nabor label. BOB HILL does « This old train« , a very enjoyable variation (with train effects) on this inexhaustible theme of trains. (# 105, 1956)
nabor 105bob hill this old train

Bob Hill, « This old train » download

From Tennessee, as his name implies, ERNIE LEE and the Southerners, for the fine and idiosyncratic Tennesseee song: »You’re next door to heaven when you’re in Tennessee » on RCA-Victor 21-0158.
rca 21-0158 ernie lee you're next door to heaven

Ernie Lee « You’re next door to heaven when you’re in Tennessee » download

Later in the ’50s, HOUSTON BARKS belts out his Country-rocker « She’s gone » on the Buck & Sunny label (101).
buck and sunny 101 houston barks she's gone

Houston Barks, « She’s gone » download

Finally, from 1961, a fine country-roker in its own right: « You’re for me » by BUCK OWENS on Capitol (here it’s a reissue, # 6038). Nice steel (Ralph Mooney) and backing (Don Rich on fiddle, George French at the piano).
capitol 6075 buck owens you're for me

Buck Owens, « You’re for me » download

Here is a download link for 3 tracks. In the future, there will be a complete link. Still got some technical problems. They are there to be solved. Bye bye!
Download: download

Late September 2013 fortnight’s favorites
sept 16th, 2013 by xavier

Howdy folks! Well it’s been quite some time since I last posted. Lot of work this Summer, down in Marseille (south of France) where I’d set my younger daughter as student in her flat up. Last post (today): an important article on the JACOBY Brothers (TNT and Columbia recordings). Nearly all their output is posted in a new presentation. I hope it will please you. Let me know. By now, for this fortnight, we begin with the guitar player of the Miller Brothers, EDDIE MILLER. He lets his bass player Jim McGraw take the lead on this April 1956 4 Star 1693 issue, « Patty cake man« , a typical 4 Star pano led honky tonker.

4 star 1693-45 eddie miller patty cake man

Another important artist on the West coast was ROCKY BILL FORD, mostly known for his 1951 « Beer drinking blues », easily found on many compilations. Lesser known is his « Willie Dum Dee » on Gilt-Edge 9 from 1951: typical baritone voice for this fine shuffler.

Rocky Bill Ford: Willie Dum Dee
gilt-edge T-9 willie dum dee

From Joliet, Illinois, 1957, comes JIMMIE LAUDERDALE for a joyful, hopping « Right away, quick! quick! » country-rocker on the Jopz label. Nice guitar.   Right away, quick quick Download jopz jimmie lauderdale   Now BEN BAKER for two tracks on the Cool label from Harrison, NJ. Atmospheric hillbilly bop (one waltz tempo). Lots of echo on the steel and fiddle. Nice tunes: « Tomorrow your leaving« (sic) and « Too late now« . strong>Tommow you_re leaving/span> Download

Too late now
cool 129A ben baker tomorrow your leavingcool 129B too late now

Finally a R&B romper with CECIL GANT and « Nashville jumps« , one of the early sides on Bullet out of Nashville. Enjoy the selections! Bye. Nashville jumps  

bullet 250A nashville jumps

Black Jack Wayne, Bay Area Country-rock (1957-1960)
mai 10th, 2013 by xavier

Black Jack Wayne

Born: February 8, 1923

Died: June 30, 1999

California Hayride

KEEN San Jose, CA

KVSM San Mateo, CA

Along the way, we’ll find artists who cause some discussion back and forth or even some debate. No, not about their music, but about the details of their career. We’ve already seen some discussion on this fellow in an exchange of emails. But, somehow we stumbled across an issue of Cowboy Songs from December 1957 that had a column written by Imogene Ellwanger who provides some tidbits. And a few other mentions elsewhere, too.

It has proven difficult to find something other than this short biography taken from hillbilly-music.com site. Black Jack Wayne (real last name  : Shults) was a native of Oklahoma who moved to the San Francisco Bay Area when he was 14. He started guitar playing as a hobby but later on down the road, it became part of his career. He had an injury of some type and came back to the Bay Area and decided to join his brother’s band, the « Rattlesnake Ramblers ».

In 1950 he and his younger brother Chuck «  Charles  » bought the «  Garden of Allah  » nightclub, located in Niles, north of Hayward-Oakland Highway. They hired country artist Ed Cima to transform the Garden by painting cartoon cowboys and western scenes in a whimsical mural over the walls. He also hand painted the ceiling to look like the Taj Mahal. They tried to change the name but people wouldn’t accept it, so it remained the Garden of Allah.?In its heyday, the Garden catered to rock and roll fans on Friday nights, country western lovers on Saturdays and square dancers on Sundays. In mid-1956, he had three daily shows over the all-western radio station KVSM out of San Mateo, California. And a one hour show over television station KOVR with the « Bar 10 Ranch Boys ».

Black Jack and the Bar-10 Ranch Boys had several recordings in 1954 on the Cavalier label. Back then their latest release was « A Dream Just Won’t Do » along with « Nip or Two » (# 839) or Jack’s brother Chuck Wayne‘s «  Mean Mean Mean  » (# 836). The latter seems to be the Bud Hobbs song.

Later on in her column, Ms. Ellwanger mentions that KOVR, Channel 13 in Stockton, had two Western music shows on the air. One show had Glenn Stepp and his band. The other had Black Jack Wayne and his « Bar 11 Ranch Boys ». Black Jack had also started a live radio show from the Garden of Allah nightclub he owned that was broadcast over KEEN every Saturday night. She also wrote that there was a possibility that the « California Hayride » might start a show originating from the Garden of Allah every Friday night over Channel 13 in Stockton.

In 1955 on the Spur label we found Charles (Chuck) Wayne for two solid Hardrock Gunter type hillbilly rockers (hillbilly bop with a dose of western swing), «  Rockin’ Rollin’ Rhythm  » and « Rodeo Time Is Here  » # 1245), and maybe more with «  The Golden Key  » (# 1248).

In 1957, per a column in Cowboy Songs by Imogene Chapman, we find that Black Jack had his own record label – Black Jack. And around that time, had put out his first recording, « Time Stole My Empire » b/w « Shallow Water Blues »  : the latter being a strong fast bluesy number. Tom Hall and Terry Fell helped on the record with their guitar and harmonica. At the time, they mentioned that you could order the record from Black Jack in care of radio station KVSM in San Mateo, California. No coincidence that Ms. Chapman might mention Black Jack, for in the same issue featuring « Stars on the Horizon », she is listed as the president of his ‘fast-growing’ and ‘real-active’ fan club.

Later on, we found a mention on Channel 2, KTVU, now of the Fox Network, on the Bayinsider.com… « Not all of KTVU’s local programming was noteworthy or long-lasting. There was The Black Jack Wayne Show, a western variety show… »

 

 

 

In the KVSM studio (San Mateo), Black Jack Wayne cut in 1957 his next record « What Makes Me Hang Around  » and backed Rose and Cal Maddox on «  Gotta Travel On  »  (Black Jack 104). Medium honky tonk (nice guitar), with Jack vocally fronting, backed on chorus by Rose. His cooperation with the Maddoxes led him to offer them «  Ugly & Slouchy  » (Columbia 40836)

In 1959 Chuck Wayne had «  Wishing/Thank You Call Again  » on Ozark 963, both pop country. Incidentally the latter was written by two comperes of the Rural Rhythm days, Johnny O’Neal and Johnny Tyler. Black Jack Wayne and the Roving Gamblers backed Bill Carter on «  Baby Brother  ». B-side, «  Ride, Gunman, Ride  », was a Jack Wayne original. Chuck Wayne had his last known recordings in 1959 on Black Jack 106 with «  I’m Sending You Some Roses  /Blue Moon Waltz  » (untraced record).

Black Jack Wayne had several interesting records on Cheyenne, among them «  Dancing With A Stranger  » (# 114) in 1960, before a couple on Big West and a solitary issue in 1962 on Decca. Charles Wayne also backed Mel Dorsey («  Little Lil  » rocker) on Black Jack.

sources: main source was « hillbilly-music.com » site. Many Youtube label shots. And a lot of research! I am not THAT satisfied with this article.

late April 2013 fortnight’s favourites
avr 16th, 2013 by xavier

Howdy folks!

This time a nice percentage will be made of records issued on major labels, beginning with Decca and the WILBURN BROTHERS (Ted &Doyle). They offer a nice version of the old ’30s Shelton Brothers’ standard « Deep Elem Blues« , recorded in Nashville (no doubt usual crew) in January 1956. (Decca 29887)

 

 

The second major will be Capitol and the uncommon in Bopping (because he’s too well-known) MERLE TRAVIS. Billy Liebert, an accomplished West coast session pianist, pounds the ivories for « Louisiana Boogie » from December 1952. Same evening session that produced « Bayou Baby« . (Capitol 2902). Happy hillbilly boogie!

 

 

 

 

 

We jump on a very smal label from Richmond, KY. Actually Burdette land had only two releases in 1960 and here it is the first by HUBERT BARNARD, « Boy She Has Gone« . Nice bopper.

 

 

Back to majors, on a subsidiary of Columbia. OKeh was maybe devoted to newcomers on the main label, although no one knows exactly why Columbia launched this short-lived serie (only 59 records issued) in 1953. In April of that year, recently signed JOE MAPHIS and his wife ROSE LEE (they were married 1952) recorded the future classic « Dim Lights, Thick Smoke (and Loud, Loud Music) » (OKeh 18013). This is what Honky tonk is all about!

TOMMY BOYLES had been cutting in 1959 « We’re Bugging Out » on the Murco label of Shreveport, La. Hear him with the « artist » button on the upper left. Here in 1960 he does another self-penned « Don’t Be Somebody Else’s Baby » on the N.J. Granite label (# 552). His story in his own words can be found on the Rockabilly Hall of Fame site.

Finally, from 1967 or 68, on the prolific Adco label (maybe a property of Hobo Jack Adkins) from Cincinnati, OH – mainly Bluegrass, Garage or Sacred tunes between 1960 and 1975, CUDDLES C. NEWSOME (rn. Corbet Newsome), born 1928, for both sides of his solitary ever 45 « So Long Baby/One Little Kiss » – nice guitar. This is Country-rock at its best.

 

 

early March 2013 fortnight’s favourites
mar 5th, 2013 by xavier

Hello folks ! Hi to returners, welcome to newcomers…

This is my bi-monthly choice of stomping, shuffling hillbilly boppers, sometimes rockers, and by surprise, R&B rockers.

Let’s begin on the West Coast, but I am not sure, as the Sage label used to sweep products largely from other areas along: the gentle rocker « Seven Come Eleven » by Al Muniz (# 262). It seem date from 1958. A prominent piano, a bit jazzy guitar solo. All this transpires laziness !

 

 

 

Then in Ohio, (Cincinnati) by Miss Joy Whittaker. She seems to have been a good seller, as she has records as soon as 1955 on M and J, and Esta in 1957. Excellent 215 is a label owned by Mrs. Estel Scarborough as the others. Dating this record « Toe Tappin Rhythm » has proven difficult : the only other I know is # 279 (Logan Valley Boys) from May 1957. So I’d assume this one as being from late ’55/early ’56. As from the bass beginning instro, we have a a mix of hillbilly bop (fiddle has its solo) and a rock-a-billy guitar. Exciting firm voice and many breaks. Could please to Rockabilly fans.

 

 

 

Down to Texas with the Corpus Christi DJ Kenny Everett, who does a fine country-rocker (1958) on All Star 7173 with « What Is It ». Accompaniment is a typical Houston one : fiddle (solo), steel (2 solos), piano (solo) and drums.

Marshall Lail then from Atlanta, Georgia for two tracks. On Sunrise first (# 001) for the energic late ’50s complaint « I need You So » (More Than You Know), before a more melodic and sentimental «Countless Hours Of Heartaches », podcasted by a certain « Mr. Honky Tonk » on his channel. No indication of the label. Finally way up North, in Hammond, Indiana, for the great bluegrassstune on the Mar-Vel 355 label by the Thomas Brothers, Melvin and Elvin, « Way  High , Way Low« . Great interplay between the three voices (falsetto and barytone). A classic !

Billboard 17 Nov. 58

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         

Billboard 8 Aug. 56

 

March 28th, 2013. Dan Nail wrote the following line: « Marshall Lail was my Father. He recorded « I Need You So » and « Countless Hours of Heartache » in 1960 at NRCO Studios in Avondale, Georgia. He printed up 500 copies on his own label called Sunrise Records. »

New Jersey country-rock: LEE EDMOND (1955-1967)
fév 26th, 2013 by xavier

Billboard March 26, 1955

Very few things are actually known of this very minor artist from New Jersey. All I learnt came from Billboard short snippets, and the records themselves. Indeed no personal data. Edmond seems (according to his 5 or 6 records over a period of 12 years) not to have moved from the New Jersey area, except in 1955: in the near West Va.

My first exposure to Edmond’s music came through a Tom Sims’ cassette. Then over the years I have been lucky enough to find the rare copy, and I think that, apart his solitary Lerac issue, here is below his entire output.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It seems that his first record came out on Original 107, a very small label from Little Ferry, NJ, in March 1955. Billboard refers is as running fine in the Wheeling, W. Va. area, where Edmond and (apparently) his wife Terry were appearing. A side («I’ll Take The Blame »)  is ordinary male/female duet, with mandolin and steel backing. Nothing spectacular. Flipside (« Your Wedding Day ») has Terry singing alone, over Lee speaking a monolog.

Then leaping towards late fifties/early sixties (impossible to ascertain), we find on the Norm label the great solid and melodic « When I’m Alone » (# 1000). It has a good guitar and steel solo, and is adorned by «Lee Edmond – Bob Raymond » « and the Country Stringers », first appellation of the backing band, later re-used. Both sides credited to Lee Edmond, who seems the boss and producer. Flipside is « My Heart Tells Me So » : a nice, although average, Country-rocker duet. There are discreet drums for the first time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Same outfit goes then on Belt 1001, without « Country Stringers » though, for « Treasure Of My Throne », a mediocre medium weeper. Just added is a dobro. Flipside is better, « Crying Party » : a medium drinking song, as an adress to a bartender.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We find another ordinary double sider on Rowe 007, from 1962. A just above average « Born With The Blues » – complete with chorus for the first time, more dobro and a guitar solo. It’s not bad either but ordinary Country-rock, as its flipside « My Heart Tells Me So », a lower standard revamp of the Norm side. The « Country Stringers » have becoe « The Swinging Travelers ».

 

 

Billboard June 2, 1962

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then 1965 two issues on the Solar label from Union Beach, New Jersey. Back to « Country Stringers », and Edmond is the producer. First the fast « Secretly  (We’ll Have To Share Our Love)» (#1007). Good sharp guitar, dobro and steel solos. An excellent track. Alas, I din’t hear the flipside « Darling I’ll Let You Go », rumoured to be a weeper. Finally in 1967 on Solar 1011, « With Her On My Mind » (Good Evening Bartender), an O.K. fast song, well sung over guitar and steel backing. « Take My Heart » is a weeper, under average standard.

 That leaves me with Lee Edmond’s last known 45 on the Lerac label (# 101) : « Woman/Woman With The Cold Hands », which I cannot comment at all on. I did order it, but it’s got lost over Atlantic Ocean…

 

All in all, a reasonable output over 12 years for a very minor artist of the East Coast. Few of his tracks are really worth looking for, like both Solars, or the Norm one. In the podcasts I have not included B-sides and weepers.

Bob Blum, Oregon Hillbilly bop (1956-1968), « Rompin’ Stompin’ Good Time »
jan 3rd, 2013 by xavier

Robert D Blum

June 1, 1934 – February 2, 2012

Obituary

Robert David Blum, 77, of Puyallup, WA, died February 2, 2012, at Life Care Center of Puyallup.

Mr. Blum was born June 1, 1934, in Gilliam, MO, to Freddy David Blum and Marguerete Katherine Narron.

He attended high school at NE High School in Kansas City, MO. Robert is a veteran of the United States Air Force.

Although Robert held many jobs, Robert’s life was his music. Robert traveled the United States playing country music with some of the biggest stars in the industry; everybody called him ‘Cowboy Bob’/'Bob the Guitar Man’. Many have compared his guitar playing to the legendary Chet Atkins. His prized guitar is a Chet Atkins Gretch, the only guitar he played throughout his entire career. Merle Haggard and George Jones were two of many of his favorite musicians. He was inducted into Sioux Falls, SD Legends of Country Music Hall of Fame in 2011. He sang and played his guitar up until he became seriously ill.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sun-Ray label: Kentucky ’60s Country-rock (1967-69)
déc 3rd, 2012 by xavier

A man by the name of James T. Price was responsible for creating the Sun-Ray record company ; in fact, the vast majority of the songs put out on the label was published through Jimmy Price Music Pub. In 1961, Price issued a modern Hawaiian steel guitar course with tablatures: he had at least one release on the label. Bud Chowning, who would later record for Sun-Ray, says that Price had converted his garage into a recording studio and printing space with printing equipment : ‘He had a piano in there and a lot of mikes. The recording room was sound proof’. Read the rest of this entry »

early December 2012 fortnight’s favorites
déc 1st, 2012 by xavier

Howdy, folks. My selection for this fortnight will be made, as usual, of lesser known artists up, and various times, ranging from approx. 1953 to early ’60s.

SHORTY LONG in 1961 was certainly no newcomer to music, as he had been cutting records on King in 1951, sharing a session with BOB NEWMAN. The latter in 1955 was reported as having joined Long’s Santa Fe Ranchers. Here  Long offers the fast « Forget Her« , an hybrid song containing a slap-bass as well as banjo, mandolin and steel on the Smiling 2675 label. Long is billed here « Kentucky », no doubt his original state. Both Shorty Long and Bob Newman paired in 1955 as Dalton Boys for a solitary « Roll, Rattler, Roll » on the X label: next fortnight.

On a Evansville, IN Eunice 1007 label, DARRELL LEE offers an average Country-rocker/Rockabilly « Really Do You Care?« .

Shorty Long

1958, TIM JOHNSON on the West Monroe label Leo (# 784) – which is actually a Starday custom issue – do come with the fine shuffler. A bit George Jones vocally, good fiddle and steel.

On Kasko 1643 (Santa Claus, IN) from 1965 RED LEWIS has a country-rocker « Yes, Indeed« (nice guitar, discreet steel) « I’ll Move along« .

The earliest track do come from Nashville in 1953. JOHNNY ROWLAND is a kind of mystery, although his voice seem very  professionnal. He founds himself on Republic 7023 with the fine « Ohio Baby« .

Finally SONNY MILLER on the Boyd label, no doubt early ’60s. Good steel in « Lonesome Old Clock« 

Sonny Miller

Jack Dumery’s september 2012 chronicle
sept 23rd, 2012 by Jack Dumery

Nadine Landry & Stephen « Sammy » Lind « Granddad’s Favorite» (2010)

A duet (Nadine on vocal and guitar, Stephen on banjo and fiddle) who offer a cajun pot-pourri of old, traditional songs as well as personal compositions. I like Nadine’s high-pitched vocal in « Parlez-nous A Boire » (Invite us to drink), or the good « Les Oiseaux Vont Chanter » (The birds are going to sing). I picked up « Un Ange Pour Toute La Louisiane» (An angel for all Louisiana) too, and the fine instrumental fiddle-led « Brown’s Dream ». Really don’t know if they are used musicians on CD, but felt it a bit monotonous in term of paces and rhythm guitar styling. Maybe a duet to look for in the future.

 

 

 

 

Eileen Jewell presents Butcher Holler « A Tribute To Loretta Lynn » Signature Sounds (2010)

This is a difficult task of paying tribute to an icon of Country music of the ’70s to the ’90s, but Eileen Jewell (vocal) does it fairly well. Actually her versions of Lynn’s songs may even sound better than the originals, according to Jack Dumery ! I believe him, me being not familiar with Loretta Lynn’s music. Anyway, I particularly liked « Don’t Come Home A-Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind »), with Eileen’s assured vocal over a crisp lead-guitar. Other goodies do include « I’m A Honky Tonk Girl », with love gone wrong lyrics which seem suited to Loretta’s image. Let’s also take a listen to the nice shuffler « A Man I Hardly Know » or the good « Deep As Your Pocket », and I’m ending with « You’re Lookin’ At Country », a great Honky tonk song in its own right. A very fine CD, you surely enjoy if you ever decide to pick it.

 

Pokey Lafarge & Soul City Three « River Boat Soul » Free Dirt Records (2010). Takoma Park, MD

This is entirely something else. Back to roots music and « jazz manouche ». Pokey and his band do offer a large amount of happy old-time music, be it traditional songs (« Claude Jones » or « Sweet Potato Blues ») or own compositions like « Daffodil Blues ». I felt like their sound of traditional instruments, like kazoo, mouth harp, banjo and acoustic guitar. All selections are taken at brisk tempos, even the blues songs. I noticed the slower « Bag Of Bones », full of laziness. A very nice record I recommend to old-time music lovers. But the other people will enjoy it too !

 

 

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