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Early February 2016 fortnight’s favorites
fév 1st, 2016 by xavier

This fortnight’s favorites selection begins with an old-time singer, JESSE ROGERS (1911-1973). He had a long stint of issues on Bluebird, Montgomery Ward and Sonora, among RCA-Victor, which label he cut records during the late ’40s for. I chose his energetic rendition of Bill Nettles‘ 1949 hit « Hadacol boogie »(# RCA 32-00001). See elsewhere in this website the story of Nettles. Rogers also recorded at the same time Hank Williams’ « Mind your own business » (RCA 33-00001). Later on he went to M-G-M for the good « Folding money« , « I got to live just what I like » and « Howlin’ and prowlin’« . Finally we find him on Arcade (Philly) for several issues, among them « Jump cats jump » (# 169) from 1961.

jesse rogers

rca 32-00001 jesse rogers - hadacol boogie

« Hadacol boogie«  download

« Mind your own business« download

« Jump cats jump« download

arcade 169 jesse rogers - cats

 

 

Then STEVE LA RUE on the Hollywood Harmad label in 1955 for a back-to-back issue of Hillbilly boppers, one fast : « New Style of lovin’ » – good hillbilly vocal over fiddle and steel, and its slower, although equally good flipside «Your heartless heart » (# 103).

« New style of lovin’« download

« Your heartless heart« download

 

harmad 103b steve la rue - heartharmad 103a steve la rue - lovin'

 

JIMMIE MINOR out of Flint, MI, did the fast bopper « So mebody rustled my sugar » on the Western Chuck Wagon label # 103 in 1955. He later had records on Mercury (# 71623 « So doggone lonesome » with Chet Atkins in 1960)

« Somebody rustled my sugar » download

west chuck wagon 103 jimmy minor - sugar

 

 

 

 

Then on the Chicago Cha Cha label from late ’59 (the very same had Ron Haydock & the Boppers), HAROLD STORIE, billed as « The Tennessee Kid » offers the solid although medium-paced « Have pity on me ». A thrilling vibrating guitar over a baritone vocal, as on the flip « Loved and lost », faster but same style, a bit Johnny Cash soundalike. (# 708)

cha cha 708 harold storie - pity

cha cha 708B harold storie - loved & lost

 

 

« Have pity on me« download

« Loved and lost« download

From 1964 and in Newbury, OH, CHUCK STACY on the Bryte label (# 9009) gave the fine modern country-rocker « Dog-gone these heartaches », with fine piano and steel.

« Dog-gone these heartaches« download

 

bryte 11991 chuck stacy - heartaches

Finally the veteran REX ALLEN for his version of the 1946 Buchanan Brothers’ hit « Atomic Power » (Mercury # 6008). Incidentally, one of the Buchanans said later in the ’60s how they hated this song. Here are the lyrics.

« Atomic power« download

atomic power (buchanan)

rex allenmercury 6008a rex allen - atomic power

Sources:Internet, 78rpm-world, my own archives.

Late January 2016 fortnight’s favorites
jan 15th, 2016 by xavier

This fortnight begins with a heck of wildness: MICHAEL RAYE & Judy Shaye (“two voices and four hands” on the label) do offer the storming “Rockin’ Jamboree” on Arcade (Philly) # 112. Boogie woogie pano, trombone and guitar combine for this from 1953.

« Rockin’ jamboree« download arcade 112A michael ray - rockin' jamboree

sandy 1028 johnny foster - locked away from your heartJOHNNY FOSTER (announced a month ago) from Alabama offers the perfect rock-a-ballad “Locked away from your heart” on the Sandy label (# 1028). Good steel and sincere vocal. 1958. He had an earlier issue (# 1014) on the same label, which sounds promising (alas untraced): « It’s a hard life/You gotta be good« . I don’t know if he’s the same artist who appeared later on Capa and Carma during the early ’60s. Anyone can confirm, or deny?

« Locked away from your heart« download

Cope McDaniel and the Cimarron Valley Boys are backing EDDE LEE for a fine melodic ballad, “I can’t believe you mean it” on Indianapolis Sunset label # F70W-2603 (1955).

« I can’t believe you mean it« download
Sunset F70 - edde lee - I can't believe you mean it (1955)

jfkl 701

« Ain’t got a nickel« download

« Little Tom« download
waterfall 502 max lowe - ain't got a nickel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAX LOWE enters for two issues, both came out from Morristown, TN. First “Ain’t got a nickel, ain’t got a dime”, a banjo led bluesy ballad, is to be found on Waterfall 502. More of the same on J-F-K-L 701 and “Little Lou”, from 1961 (thanx to Youtube Cheesebrew Wax Archive chain).

Ozark 1236a  billy glenn - I left the danceOzark 1236b billy glenn -  I'll never cry again

 

« I left the dance« download

« I’ll never cry again« download

That’s 1960 when BILLY GLENN issued on (California) Ozark label L30W-1236 a lovely mid-paced bopper with “I left the dance” (nice steel). The flipside is an uptempo ballad, “I’ll never cry again”. Curiously for a West coast label, the publishing house is “Mississipi Valley”. Glenn also appeared on Yucca 208 (“Bakersfield town”).

 

 

The “REAVES WHITE COUNTY RAMBLERS” go back to the late ‘20s on Vocalion 5218 for the romping “Ten cent piece”. It’s a fast raw hillbilly, showing prominent fiddle and a strong vocal. Courtesy 53jaybop on Youtube.

« Ten cent piece« download

vocalion 5218 reaves white cty ramblers - ten cent piece

From Wichita, KS, emanate the Kanwic label on which OWEN McCARTY & His Troubadours cut “Key to my heart” (# 145), an uptempo ballad with nice steel, in 1968. McCarty was to have two other known records: on Show Land (produced by Benny Hess) and Air Cap.

kanwick 145 owen McCarty - key to my heart

« Key to my heart« download

AL URBAN doesn’t need introduction. He cut the great Hillbilly bopper (1957) “Looking for money” (Sarg 148), and the fabulous twin-sider Rockabilly “Gonna be better times/Won’t tell you her name” (Sarg 158), without forgetting his two issues on Fang 1001 and 1003 (untraced). Here he appears on a “manufactured by Tanner ‘n’ Texas [T.N.T.]” A.P.U. 201, which shows two addresses: Gonzales (hometown to Urban) and San Antonio, TX. His “Run away” is similar to his Sarg sides, with a heavy Starday sound: a piano player sounding like Doc Lewis, a fiddle sounding like Red Hayes. Could it be that this record has actually been recorded in Houston?

al urbanapu 201 alurban - run away  »Run away« download

EARL PETERSON, the Michigan’s Singing Cowboy (1950-1955)
jan 5th, 2016 by xavier

earl pic1Despite a long career that spanned almost 45 years, comparatively little is known about Earl Peterson. He was born in Paxton, Illinois, on February 24, 1927 and moved to Michigan when he was 18 months old. He apparently became proficient on both guitar and drums and formed his own band, the Sons of the Golden West, when he was still in high school. The group secured a regular spot on WOAP, Owosso, then moved to WMYC in Alma, Michigan, before settling at WCEN, Mount Pleasant. WCEN gave Earl and his group a regular show, Earl’s Melody Trails, and made him the talent director, staff announcer and farming news editor. Earl was to study Law after high school but he switched to a musical career instead.

Earl made his debut in the record business when he formed a record label, Nugget Records, with his mother, in January 1950.

nugget 1B earl peterson - take me back to michigan

« Take me back to Michigan« download

Peterson also undertook road trips to publicise his record and, at the same time, worked guest dee-jay spots at various stations. It seems as though his mother, Pearle Lewis, was the driving force behind Peterson. Sam Phillips recalled that the pair arrived on his doorstep early in 1954 pitching « The Boogie blues ». Phillips located some country session musicians to work with Peterson and the result of the session was released in the Spring of 1954.
« Boogie blues« (Sun 197)download
« In the dark« (Sun 197)
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/In-the-dark.mp3
download
sun 197 earl peterson - boogie bluessun 197 earl peterson - in the dark

The story becomes more convoluted from that point. In October of that year Peterson, with a healthy disregard for contracts and AFM regulations, re-recorded the same song for Columbia. The song was re-copyrighted and probably sold more than the 2500 copies that Phillips had shipped.

columbia 21364 earl peterson - boogie blues

columbia 21364 earl peterson - believe me

 

 

 

« Boogie blues« (Columbia 21364)download
« Believe me » (Columbia 21364)
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/21364-Believe-Me-Earl-Peterson.mp3
download

Peterson’s half-brother, Bob Lewis, recalls that Peterson was desperately unhappy with the quality of the Sun recording and that may account for his lack of reserve when Don Law approached him to re-record the tune. In any event, Peterson had a few singles released on Columbia but they were shipped into changing market conditions (released between February 1955 and July 1956) and Peterson may have tired of the constant touring necessary to support his releases. His mother ran a resort club, the Bass Lake Pavillion, and Earl formed a band that included twin steel guitars, two lead guitars, two fiddles and his half-brother on drums and he played here on a regular basis supporting all the acts that worked the area as singles. In this way, Earl and the boys backed Marty Robbins, Moon Mullican and many more. The ’53 Buick which Earl had driven all those miles was increasingly confined to short trips.

 

« I’m not buying, baby« (Columbia 21406)download>

« Be careful of the heart you’re going to break » (Columbia 21406)download

columbia 21406 earl peterson - I'm not buying, baby

columbia 21467 earl peterson 78 I ain't gonna fall in love

columbia 21467 earl peterson - I'll live my life alone

In 1960 Peterson and his family established radio station WPLB in Greenville, Michigan. In columbia 21406 earl peterson - be careful of the heart1962, they switched to the FM frequency and the following year saw Earl’s retirement from the performing side of the music business. By that point there was an undeniable quotient of rock and roll in country music and, in Bob Lewis’ words, « Earl wasn’t crazy about that stuff ». In 1965 Earl learned that he had cancer but he continued to work at the station until his death in May 1971.earl peterson2

« I ain’t gonna fall in love » (Columbia 21467) download

« I’ll live my life alone » (Columbia 21467) download
Earl Peterson’s music, a survey by bopping’s editor

  • any Columbia issue coupled an uptempo and a slowie. The vocal is firm and assured, and the backing is on a par with the best what Nashville did offer at the time. Although unknown musicians, there was a steel, a fiddle and on « Boogie blues » (remake of the Sun version) a welcome rinky-dink piano. I posted the tracks side-by-side to let yourself judge.
  • « Boogie blues » on Sun 197 has sewing fiddle, steel and drums. Peterson’s voice is very reminiscent to that of Jimmie Rodgers, and the song itself derives from pre-war country songs, like Gene Autry’s ‘blues’ songs. Its flipside « In the dark » is a strong shuffler.
  • « Alimony blues », although in the past (N.L. Redita LP) credited to Peterson, is in fact done by Gene Steele.
  • « You just can’t be trusted », found on Youtube (Mr. Honky tonk chain), is evidently a ’60s recording, nice done, although I don’t know the original label neither the flipside.

« You gotta be my baby« (Columbia 21540)download

« World of make believe« (Columbia 21540)download

Sources : « The country years » (1987) by Colin Escott ; page on Earl Peterson – also music from « Columbia 20000 » (Willem Agenant) ; scans from 78rpm-world ; « The Hillbilly researcher » for scan and music to Nugget 78rpm.

« You just can’t be trusted » (’60′s)download

columbia 21540 earl peterson - you gotta be my baby

Early January 2016 fortnight’s favorites: more seasonal gifts (15 selections)!
jan 1st, 2016 by xavier

Howdy folks, a happy and bopping New Year to everyone. As a seasonal gift, I will post no less than 15 selections, as on the Xmas fortnight.

First a mystery with GEORGE BOWE & the Travelers. It has proved impossible to find any detail on him neither even the location of the label, Eagle – a common label name during the ’50s/60s. A very small clue is to be detected in the deadwax, « Rimrock » – which leads one to Arkansas Wayne Raney‘s label of the ’60s. Anyway Bowe delivers a Rockabilly styled opus with « Big man » (Eagle 110A) – the whole thing is quiet and lazy. B-side (« Do you remember ») is a melodic ballad, a bit sentimental, over sympathetic backing.

« Big man« downloadEagle 110bgeorge bowe -big manEagle 110a george bowe - do you remember

« Do you remember« download

Note: Alexander Petrauskas did advise me that the Eagle label was definitely associated with Rimrock, the latter pressing the Eagle products.

 

 

DON WHITNEY (incomplete bio statistics – he died in 1985) was a D.J. associated with Arkansas radio stations KLCN in Blytheville, then KOSE in Osceola (1957) ; he’s been too on WELO in Tupelo (MS), and cut a whole string of boppers for 4*. Where he cut them ? Probably Nashville. I chose from 1950 « Red hot boogie » (# 1471), call-and-response format (girl chorus). Steel and piano are barely audible, while the guitar player does a too short but wild solo. « Move on blues » (# 1588) from 1951 is a fine bluesy tune over a boogie guitar. Discreet steel and piano.

don whitney pic

4* 1471 don whitney  red hot boogie4* 1568 whitney - move on blues

 

« Red hot boogie« download

« Move on blues« download

 

 

On Adco records (# 781), cut in Cincinnati, OH, next comes GLEN CANYON and a rocker from 1965, « I won’t be able to make it » : a shrilling guitar thoughout, and the disk is valued $ 50 to 100. I couldn’t locate the flipside « Still in love with you », reputedly a bopper. Canyon appeared also on Acorn and Boone (Kentucky).

« I won’t be able to make it« download

adco 781 glen canyon - I won't be able

 

 

 

The Sandy label out of Mobile,AL. is interesting for many records issued between 1957 and 1962 and highly revered by Rockabilly/Rock’n'roll buffs : do Ronny Keenan, Happy Wainwright, Jackie Morningstar (« Rockin’ in the graveyard »), Ray Sawyer (« Rockin’ satellite ») or Darryl Vincent (« Wild wild party ») ring each a bell to you ? Well, the label also had its hillbilly boppers, like Johnny Foster (more on him next fortnight, late January 2016) or WADE JERNIGAN. Both his sides (# 1010) are high quality boppers penned by label bossman Johnny Bozeman in 1958. « Road of love », medium paced, has a very « hillbilly » type vocal (high pitched at moments), over a prominent fiddle and good steel, while its flip « So tired » uses the same format, just a little bit slower. A good record for Hillbilly lovers.

« Road of love« download

« So tired« downloadsandy 1019 wade jernigan - road of lovesandy 1010 wade jernigan - so tired

Now on to Louisiana. The Khoury’s label began activities in 1951 to cease them in 1955 (last known is # 647, « Lu Lu boogie » by Nathan Abshire, which I owned moons ago before selling it – I am biting my fingers now..). We find here on # 700B (not in numerical order, this one is from 1954) a fabulous Cajun wildie « Louisiana stomp » by LEBLANC’S FRENCH BAND (an unidentified singer yells and encourages by his yells the whole fiddle led orchestra). Reverse is by Eddie Shuler, the founder of Goldband. Second La. selection : by GENE RODRIGUE, who had other releases on Folk-Star, Houma and Rod (the Cajun Rockabilly « Little cajun girl » from 1959). Here is his « Jole fille » (Meladee 101, cut in New Orleans), full of energy and « joie de vivre », Cajun style. Nice fiddle, steel and piano. This comes from the late ’50s apparently.

khoury's 700B le blanc's french band - louisiana stompmeladee 101 gene rodrigue - jole fille

 

« Louisiana stomp« download

« Jole fille« download

More from Louisiana with PAL THIBODEAUX (also known as Little Pal Hardy on Imperial) and « Port Arthur boogie » (Sky Line OP-154). Call-and-response, sung in French and English. Fiddle solo, sympathetic backing, two good guitar solos encouraged by the singer a la Bob Wills.
« Port Arthur boogie« download

sky line OP-154 pal thibodeaux - port Arthur boogie

 

You ask for yodeling ? Here it’s ROBERT LUNN (billed as « The Talking Blues Boy ») in late 1947. He cut I don’t know where (I suspect North of the States) the marvelous « Yodeling blues », slow’n'easy – fiddle, ‘blues’ lyrics, guitars, and spoken vocals, a dream…On Mercury 6104.

robert Lunn pic2

Robert Lunn

mercury 6104 robert lunn - yodeling blues« Yodeling blues« download

GEORGE GREEN & The Missouri Ranch Boys comes next with a good 2-sider on Zeylon . The medium paced « I don’t love you anymore » is backed by a welcome accordion, and sounds its late ’40s recording, although its prefix (J80W, an RCA pressing, dates from..1958). The flip « Be a little angel » is a jumping little thing, which grows on you at each playing. Good fiddle.

« I don’t love you anymore« download

« Be a little angel« download

Zeylon a J80 george green-I don't love you anymoreZeylon bJ80  george green - be a little angel
« Just because «  is a classic Sun side, only issued on RCA, by ELVIS PRESLEY. We conclude this fortnight with his version (RCA 47-6640, early 1956) and the original by the SHELTON BROTHERS (in the ’30s). Great lyrics. Elvis does a very fine job on it.

 

decca 46008 shelton brothers - just because

 

 

 

 

rca 6640 elvis - just because

 

Shelton Brothers « Just because« download

Elvis Presley « Just because« download

 

 

Sources : Somelocaluser blogspot (George Bowe, Wade Jernigan, George Green), Youtube for several tunes (Don Whitney – scans from 78rpmworld) ; Robert Lunn on a 3-CD compilation of country music on Mercury, picture from « hillbilly-music.com ». Hope you enjoy this selection. Comments welcome. ‘Till then, bye.

 

Note: important addition on Khoury records by Louisiana tireless researcher and faithful friend Wade Falcon (Feb. 5th, 2016):

I read your latest article on Leblanc on Khoury.  The musician is Floyd Leblanc.  Fiddle player that originated with Bennie Hess and Virgil Bozman and the Oklahoma Tornadoes.   Floyd had recorded the song Louisiana Stomp first with Virgil’s label O.T. Recording Company (#104-B)
After Virgil folded the label, Khoury who helped finance it, picked it up along with his artists and started Khoury and Lyric.   Khoury re-released the song on his label.  (700-B)
I actually know Floyd’s daugher.  Very nice person.
Also, Khoury’s 600 series label ended with #652 in 1955.  He started his 700 series again (which we’ll refer to as the « second 700 series »).  There, you have the 700-B side you mention in your blog with Shuler on one side and Leblanc on the other.  That lasted till about 1962.   His last Cajun in the series was #720 Pee Wee Broussard.
Thanks, Wade!
OT 104 floyd leblanc - louisiana stomp
Late December 2015 fortnight’s favorites: a merry bopping Xmas (thirteen selections, 1950-1963), y’all!
déc 15th, 2015 by xavier

For this Xmas 2015, as a gift, you faithful visitors of bopping.org will get 13 (yes, thirteen) selections, instead of the usual only 6 ; although for several months I gradually posted more and more tunes. Merry bopping Xmas to y’all !

 

 

« Deep Elem blues » was first recorded by the SHELTON BROTHERS (Bob & Joe on vocals and mandolin/guitar) in February 1935 in Chicago (Decca 5422), before the Prairie Ramblers gave their own version in August of the same year. The song refers to the black quarter in Dallas, where you need 50 $ because of the red headed women there. It was an immediate success, revived by others over the years, namely by JERRY LEE LEWIS, whose 1957 version remained unissued in the Sun archives for 40 years ! Same year saw the WILBURN BROTHERS‘ version (Decca 29887) : Doyle & Ted do a fine job on this song. Later on Jerry Garcia (Grateful Dead) and Levon Helm had their versions too, outside the scope of this blog, as they say.

decca 5422 shelton brothers - deep elem blues

sun 78 logo

Shelton Brothers « Deep Elem blues« download

Jerry Lee Lewis « Deep Elem blues« download

Wilburn Brothers (Teddy & Doyle) »Deep Elem blues« download Read the rest of this entry »

The polished yet stomping hillbilly of JOE CARSON (1954-1963), « I’m not allergic to love » to « Time lock »
oct 31st, 2015 by xavier

[I really don’t know where I picked this biography from (a great lack of tidiness on my part in my archives), but it’s so complete and living that I decided to publish it without changing an iota. If any way the pages below are copyrighted and/or authored, I’ll gladly credit it to the right person. My thanks to him/her. Now let’s go.]

« A few years ago an old friend gave me a wonderful gift. I was visiting him at home when, without warning, he suddenly produced a Swan 4 slice toaster box saying, « This is for you. » I insisted I didn’t need a toaster whereupon he laughingly invited me to look inside. I nervously opened the box and my eyes almost popped out of my head (actually they popped out, bounced off all four walls and popped back in again). The box was crammed full of 7 inch singles, all country, all 50s to 70s, rescued from American jukeboxes and included records by George Jones, Patsy Cline, Loretta Lynn, Ernest Tubb, Willie, Dolly, Tammy and a whole lot more.

The amazing thing was that it also contained records by artists whose names I knew but had never heard before and it was a treat to hear them at last. One record, however, intrigued me most. It contained absolutely fantastic versions of two Willie Nelson songs « I Gotta Get Drunk » and « Who’ll Buy My Memories » performed by a guy called Joe Carson. I tried books, magazines, the internet, friends, everything I could think of in an effort to find out more about him but drew a blank every single time, despite the fact that the record was on Liberty, a major label. Who was this guy? Surely with a voice like his he made more than one record? How come no one knew who he was? I didn’t even know which part of the USA he was from, or even if he WAS American. I finally admitted defeat and contented myself with the one record I had. All corrections/additions in [...]joe carson

[I already knew Joe Carson for years, via several Mercury and Capitol songs taped on the fabulous Tom Sims cassettes, and wanted other stuff from him. I bought in 1982 the French reissue of his solitary Liberty album, but was a bit disappointed: it sounded more Country than hillbilly, nevertheless well done 1960's Honky tonk. Anyway I couldn't last finding everything Carson had recorded before. Then I found the D single from 1959: wonderful Hillbilly uptempo ballads. All in all, he had published 11 singles only during his short career.] Read the rest of this entry »

early October 2015 fortnight’s favorites: « Record spinning boogie » or « Hi de ho boogie »?
oct 1st, 2015 by xavier

DUSTY TAYLOR, first selection of this fortnite, offers with « My shining star » a pleasant shuffler, with nice sawing fiddle (solo). An average although nice tune to find on Nugget OP-190 (4 Star custom) from 1956. I don’t know where it comes from. Taylor had another issue on Nugget 191 (« Down grade/Just rumors »), and a record in 1968 on the Nashville Stop label.

« My shining star« download

nugget OP190 dusty taylor

 

« The hillbilly hop« download

leo 1824 curly gibson hillbilly hop

 

 

 

 

 

« The hillbilly hop » is a medium rockabilly (short piano solo) by CURLY GIBSON‘s Sunshine Playboys (vocal by Colin Prevette, who has even here some hiccups) on a Leo label (there were dozens by this name) # 1824. A clue of location is given by another record by Curly Gibson on the Pennsylvania Record label out of Pennsburg, PA. The Leo issue is from 1957.

With « All by myself » by DOUG DAVIS on the Texan Nite star label (# 007, from ca. 1963), we touch the real thing ! Already posted in 2010, this time with a nice label scan. It has haunting steel, perfect ballad vocal and confident backing. My prefered all-time ballad. Davis had another record on Malinda 113 (untraced)
nit star 007A doug davis
« All by myself« download

 

Next three tracks all by the veteran AL DEXTER, who, at the time they were cut (1950), had already records since 1936. All three do come from a long Cincinnati session for King.

As the title implies, « Walking with the blues » (King 884A) is a mid-paced item with fine harmonica and good guitar (Zeb Turner ? Louis Innis?). The whole sounds much like the Delmore.

Further on, « Hi de ho boogie » (# 884AA) is a lively tune. The harmonica has been dropped, replaced by fiddle and good steel. And the third track of this session is « Diddy wah boogie » (# 913AA): the harmonica returns for a pleasant and fast track.

« Walking with the blues« download

« Hi de ho boogie« download

« Diddy wah boogie« download

king 884A al dexter walking with the bluesking 884AA al dexter -hi de ho boogieking 913AA al dexter - diddy wah boogie

We conclude with BILL HUSKEY on the Meritone label (Lenoir City, TN) for a great « Record Spinning boogie », half sung, half played (solid acoustic guitar), which reminds me a lot of « Doin’ the boogie woogie » by Johnnie Barfield (Bullet 620).
« Record spinning boogie« download

meritone 1001 bill huskey record spinning boogie

al dexter pic

Al Dexter

Late June 2015 fortnight’s favorites
juin 15th, 2015 by xavier

Howdy folks, I am back from Corsica isle (« l’île de Beauté ») where I visited my girl friend and did help her to set up her fairytales’ exhibition before children. While I was there I couldn’t get access to my files, thus not allowing to myself to set up early June fortnight’s favorites.

glen reeves2

Glenn Reeves

 

Let’s begin in Texas with GLENN REEVES, born 1932 in Shamrock, TX. He had his first two records on the T.N.T. Label (owned by Bob Tanner, who billed proudly his labels records as « Tanner’n'Texas »!). « I’m Johnny on the spot » (TNT 120) is already a proto-rockabilly classic. But its reverse, the plaintive hillbilly « The blues are out tonight », is not so well known, although a very good ballad. Listen to the real hillbilly pronunciation of Reeves, over a nice fiddle and steel. I love such a record like this. 

« The blues are out tonight« download

Later he had on TNT 129 « I ain’t got room to rock », before switching to Republic (the great « That’ll be love ») and Atco (« Rockin’ country style »/ »Drinkin’ wine spo-dee-o-dee ») in 1956, yet before turning teen on Decca in 1957. Meanwhile, he had relocated in Florida, pushing himself as a performer and D.J. On WPDQ out of Jacksonvile, FL. That’s where he met Mae Axton, her fellow-composer, and Tommy Durden, who both looked for someone who could demo their « Heartbreak hotel ». At first, Reeves denied, before agreeing – and the result was presented at a Nashville D.J. convention late 1955 to Elvis as his first million seller (the promise of Mae Axton), which he cut January 1956, in a style very close to Reeves. Here is the Reeves’ demo.

tnt 120A glenn reeves -  the blues are out tonight

Glenn Reeves « Heartbreak hotel« download

The third compere was TOMMY DURDEN. He had a long story as steel player for Tex Ritter, and later for Johnny Cash, and composer (e.g. « Honey bop » for Wanda Jackson). In 1951 on the Sahul Kahal’s Freedom label out of Houston, Texas, he cut the great « Hula boogie » (# 5025). Later on, he had his own version of « Heartbreak hotel » (« Moods » LP, religious songs), before relocating in Michigan. He retired in the early ’90s.

tommy durden

Tommy Durden

 

 

 

Tommy Durden « Hula boogie« download

 

 

freedom 5025 hula boogie

 

 

On the next artist, GEORGE HEFFINGTON, I know litterally nothing, except he was one of the first to record on the growing Toppa label (owned by Jack Morris, out of Covina, Ca.), and is backed for the fast « Ghost of love » (# 1007, 1958) by, among others, Ralph Mooney on steel. Good piano too.

George Heffington « Ghost of love« download
toppa 1007A ghost of love

Real name to next artist was Wilcoxson, but he’s known now as JIMMIE DALE. And there were in the ’50s two different men with the same name. The first to jump on my mind is an Indiana artist, who cut two Starday custom records in 1958. First on Jeffersonville, IN Saber label (# 707), he cut the fabulous two-sider « Baby doll » (great slap bass, energetic drums and lead guitar) and « Darlin’ » (very nice piano, à la Teddy Reddell over a mambo rhythm). In Louisville, KY, he had in 1958 too on the Farrall label (# 687) « Man made moon », more of a country record. Nice vocal, and again a rinky-dink piano and good steel. I couldn’t locate the flipside « For a day ».

The second JIMMIE DALE was a Nashvillian, who cut « Tennessee ghost train » in 1953 on the Original label # 501. The credits don’t give any clue. Lot of echo on the steel, a train song of course.

 

 

jimmie dale

Jimmie Dale (Saber, Farrall)

Jimmie Dale « Baby doll« download

Jimmie Dale « Darlin’« download

Jimmie Dale « Man made moon« download

Jimmie Dale [different artist]« Tennessee ghost train« download

saber 708 baby dollsaber 708A Darlin'farral 687man made moonoriginal 501 tenn. ghost train

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s all for this fortnight, folks. Comments welcome, as usual.

Sources and credits : internet, RCS, Youtube, lot of labor !

Rem Wall & the Green Valley Boys: Michigan’s Country-rock (1950-1962)
mai 17th, 2015 by xavier

Not many things are known about Rem Wall. He was born 1918 in Frankfort, Illinois and he died 1994.

He started at an early age entertaining during the ’30s at different local radio stations and, after being graduated in 1939, decided to settle in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He performed on radios WGFG, later WKZO, where he had even a TV show, « the Green Valley Jamboree » which lasted for 36 years, himself being signed to WKZO for even 44 years.

He then recorded for a lot of companies : Wrightman in 1951 (as Rembert Wall), then Bakersfield (1957), Glenn (1960-62), Wolverine and Columbia. He even had an issue in Great Britain. His music, although hillbilly at the beginning, became more and more softer by the years ’60s. His best songs are : « Heartsick and blue », « Waiting » (lot of echo for this good ballad), « One of these days » (banjo led folkish tune) , « Time alone » from 1962 (a fine shuffler) or « Carried away ».

In 1958 he was chosen by the U.S. Government to represent Country music in Germany and then he toured a lot there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He seems to have remained a regional hitmaker, having given up his career after his wife’s death during the ’60s. His son Rendal carries on the family tradition as a guitar player.

 

Sources: various. Wrightman sides and label scan do come from Hillbilly Researcher. Glenn label scans from « 45rpm » blogsite. Picture from hillbilly-music site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

« The girl on the matchbox cover« [1950]download

« Heartsick and blue« download

« Waiting« download

« I’m losing my tears over you« download

« One of these days« download

« Carried away« download

« Time alone« [1962]download

 

 

 

You can read a lot more on RemWall by clicking this link: http://www.visioncouncil.org/bobrowe/rem_wall.htm

TOM JAMES (1954-1958) in Nashville – plus a foray into the ’70s
mai 15th, 2015 by xavier

tom james picTOM JAMES is completely unknown except in the Rockabilly/R&R circles for his Klix issue « Track down baby/Hey baby » from 1957. No whereabouts neither his birthday year are known. Is even still alive today ?

He already had come from Oklahoma when he got a recording contract with RCA-Victor. His only session with this major label came early 1954 in Nashville, Tennessee.

Tom James(vo,g) with Chet Atkins(el g) Louis Innis(rh g) Robert Foster(steel g) Dale Parker (bjo) Bob Moore(b).

(Thomas Radio Productions) Nashville,February 17,1954

 

E4VB-3624 Don’t lead me on RCA Victor 20/47-5790, Cactus 5052

E4VB-3625 Your kind of lovin’ RCA Victor 20/47-5695, Cactus RCA vol.2

E4VB-3626 Sample of your love RCA Victor 20/47-5695

E4VB-3627 I’m a pig about your lovin’ RCA Victor 20/47-5790

 

All four tracks are uptempos, the slowest being « Sample of your love ». They are nothing but pleasant hillbilly boppers (prominent bass) although a bit common.

« Dont lead me on« download

« Your kind of lovin’« download

« Sample of your love« downoad


« I‘m a pig about your lovin‘ »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/10-Tom-James-Im-A-Pig-About-Your-Lovin.mp3download Read the rest of this entry »

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