Late March 2017 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks,

As for the past, here are a good amount of boppers cut between 1947 and as recent as 1966.

Fiddler TEX GRIMSLEY was a Louisiana Hayride resident, and played his part on almost – if not all – Pacemaker sides of 1949-50. This label was co-owned by Horace Logan (boss of the Hayride) and Webb Pierce, and was constantly of high standard. Grimsley & his Showboys included guitar player Buddy Attaway [his story is somewhere told in this site], Shot Jackson on steel and the inevitable Tillman Franks on bass, while the vocal duties are taken by (supposed related) Cliff Grimsley, and the tune « Shuffle on down » (Pacemaker 1005) is really a lazy, shuffling call-and-response format bopping song. Shot Jackson produces really wild effects on his steel.
« Shufflin’ on down »

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Tex Grimsley had another disc in this style : « Walking the dog » (Pacemaker 1001, reissued by the big NYC concern Gotham # 408), as well as a fine double-sider out on Red Barn 1071 (« It’s all coming home to you/Sorry for you »), and probably did the fiddling part on the Shreveport Specialty sessions (1949-1954). 

»One little teardrop too late » is a crazy-paced item issued as by PLAIN SLIM & the O’Dell Family on the Davis, WVA Cozy label (# 570) from as late as 1966. Two soli each by fiddle and lead guitar over a strong rhythm guitar. One can wonder how this type of record was launched in a world of current pop music, even commercial Country. The name itself sounds like a pseudonym.

« One little tear drop too late »

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From 1951 and by a veteran, PHIL HARRIS, for the fine « Tennessee hill-billy ghost » on a RCA EP-702. He’s been before during the Forties on Ara (« That’s what I like about me », certainly not the Terry Fell’s song) or Okeh.

« Tennessee hill-billy ghost »

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Another mystery comes from WVA, that of KED KILLEN, and his superb Hillbilly boppers cut between 1966 and 1969 on his own Western Ranch label. Here are both sides of WR 119. Uptempo side is « Hey pretty mama » , while « Lonesome blues » is slower. Plaintive, wailing voice over a top notch accompaniment – a welcome echo too, and a fine guitar. Both sides could easily have been cut a good 10 to 15 years before.

« Hey pretty mama« 

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« Lonesome blues »

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DICK HART on the Texan label Cowtown Hoedown (# 778) delivers a very fine uptempo bluesy « Time out for the blues ». Solid rhythm, pounding guitar and a wild steel (June 1957). Who will get interest with this important and rich label, Cowtown Hoedown ? Its name was changed a short time later to just Cowtown.

« Time out for the blues »

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From Texas to near Oklahoma with BILLY WEBB & his Seminoles for « Burdock road » on the Stardale label # 50611 ; label was located in Morris, OK. It’s a solid Hillbilly bopper with good fiddle solo and steel/piano over a shuffle rhythm. There were 3 Stardale labels around the same time.

« Burdock road »

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To get to an end, here are two 4* custom issues on the Nugget label (# 190 and 191) by DUSTY TAYLOR and his Rainbow Valley Rangers. « My shining star » and « Down grade » are very fine Hillbillies. Taylor was also in 1947 on the West coast label Westernair (# 107B) with the great « Ranger boogie » : typical romping ’40s music, accordion to the fore, fiddle is well present. The record is billed « instrumental’ but Taylor has a great, swinging vocal in it. A very pleasant record !

I just found « Boogie blues« , apparently issued on Westernair (untraced label), and on a French compilation, « Country Boogie ». And it’s a romper too!

« My shining star »

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« Down grade »

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« Ranger boogie« 

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« Boogie Blues » (with Cal Shrum)

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Sources : YouTube as usual ; 45cat and 78rpm-worlds ; Hillbilly researcher blog ; my own archives.

Greenville, S. Carolina, 1961: the KALL Record Company

Kall Record CompanyGreenville, South Carolina .

The little known Kall Records are pretty much a forgotten label owned I believe by Alan Riddle . They were producing some good Country/Honkytonk/Gospel records from 1960 onwards but only ten releases are known and there are some gaps within the run that I hope to fill within the coming months.

There seems to be a connection with local label ‘Plaid’ (also Greenville, SC) owned by Charles Rush , who were also releasing some decent country/Rockabilly around the same period and area , the connection being Alan Riddle who saw releases on both labels and I believe was also a co-owner of the publishing company ‘Duride’  along with record producer Don Dudley, hence the ‘DU’ and ‘RIDE’ from Riddle ?.

The Kall label is pretty recognisable with the bold blue lettering ‘KALL’ across the top with the small boy wearing a baseball cap shouting ! (this later changed to a smaller label design with psychadelic Orange/Yellow colouring )

The label numbers changed a few times but I am pretty sure ALAN RIDDLE was the first with his release in 1961 ‘It Takes You’ B/w ‘I Love No One But You’ # 0041. Before this release, Riddle had his song ‘The Moon Is Crying’ released in America on ‘Plaid’ # 1001 in 1960 and also on ‘Fling’ #219 in 1961 and then in Canada on the ‘Zirkon’ label # 1010 . Both ‘The Moon Is Crying’ and this Kall release were both produced by Don Dudley.

« It takes you »

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« I love no one but you »

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This 45 was straight country/Honkytonk up tempo shuffle and the A side moves along at a decent pace.  The flip is a more basic slow number with girl backing vocals but has some nice guitar work during the solo.

The second release # 0042/246 by WALLACE HOOPER and the Dixie Ramblers . Again published by ‘Duride’ and is a pretty darn good Country tune.  ‘In The Middle’ B/w ‘Third Stool Down’. Both songs were written with the help of top Nashville writer Jesse Evatt . The A side is a slow number but shows some decent guitar and the flip is your typical mid tempo bar room drinking song which has some lovely steel and fiddle. I have no info on who were the Dixie Ramblers !

« In the middle« 

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« Third stool down »

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CHARLIE and FRANKThe Country Lads” were next to see a release with Kall # 0043 . Again ‘Duride’ were the publishers of both songs and again both produced by Don Dudley. Both songs were recorded at the legendary Mark V Studios in Greenville. SC .

The A side ‘Just For Today’ is sung by Charlie Driggers ( Left) with Frank Adcox (right) on Rhythm Guitar, Bill Huffman on the upright Bass and Otis Forrest on Piano. A nice country tune sung and played well. The flip ‘Never Do Him Wrong’ a dual harmony tune with Charlie on lead vocal and Frank on tenor vocal, some lovely steel with superb vocals makes this a pretty good release. Charlie and Frank were joined by JR. Cisson on Steel and again Bill Huffman on bass but who played the drums is unknown.

 

« Just for today »

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« Never do him wrong« 

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Charlie Driggers passed away in 1996. Frank Adcox is still alive and strummin’ and the grand old age of 82. Below is a photo of Frank Adcox holding the 45 I found for him as a gift as he had no copy himself and another photo of him playing his old guitar.

Next saw Kall dip their toes into the Bluegrass/Gospel field with a release by ‘ FAMILY TRIO with JOYCE HAWKS’ . This saw a 1st time pressing by ‘Sheldon’ for the label . ‘He Rescued Me’ B/w ‘ When I Found Jesus’ are pretty good bluegrass gospel tunes that would have been sold locally and were very popular in this area of the States.

When I Found Jesus’ is the better of the two sides and really starts with some great mandolin and has a change in tempo throughout along with some super harmonies .

 

 

« He rescued me »

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« When I found Jesus« 

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MAX HEDRICK was next with the first of his two releases on the label.  Kall # 497 ‘Welcome Sign Upon My Heart’ B/w ‘Lonely Nights’.  The A side was published by ‘Delrush’, most probably Alan Riddles new partner Alan Rush (owner of the previously mentioned ‘Plaid’ Records) . Both labels promote the ‘Riddle/Rush’ promotion and again this was a ‘Sheldon’ pressing.

« Welcome sign upon my heart »

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« Lonely nights« 

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Both sides have stickers across the artists name as above it is incorrectly spelt ‘Hendrick’ . The A side is a terrific little Honky Tonk number, with great vocals by Max and some great steel all the way through. The flip, ‘Lonely Nights’, is slightly slower in tempo and is a typical sad country song but again sung well by Hedrick and again an unknown player lays down some great steel guitar.

Kall turned next to the fantastic ‘JIM SOUTHERN’ with the next release in 1961 on Kall # 499. A blistering country bopper that is right out of the top drawer. ‘Talking To The Angels’ written by ‘Plaid’ recording artist Gene Smith, ’Derush’ were again the publishers and is pure magic, sweet steel and Jim has some nice echo on his vocal and the flip ‘Darling, Where Is The Moonlight’ published by ‘Southern, another  great tune and this moves along nicely with some sweet harmonies . The pressing plant for this 45 was again ‘Sheldon’.

« Talking to the angels »

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« Darling, where is the moonlight« 

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« Just one phone call »

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« Foolish pride« 

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Kall # 500 is next with some country by ‘BRENDA & ERNIE‘ , you get all the usual pedal steel and lashings of great harmonies . The A side ‘Just One Phone Call’ has Brenda taking lead and the B side ‘Foolish Pride’ has Ernie on lead. Both are real nice country tunes played with care and love. And again this record was pressed by ‘Sheldon’.

On a side note these two songs were written by ‘B. Hedrick & E. Hedrick’ (maybe a relation to Max Hedrick ? ) who had two releases on Kall.

MAX HEDRICK was next with his second and final release (as far as I know) with Kall # 501. Both songs written by ’Hedrick and Brown’. Released in 1961 this is a fantastic record and one of the best from the label. This again is a ‘Sheldon’ pressing . The A side ‘Actions’ is nothing spectacular and is just a slow country weepie and was apparently aired on ‘The Grand Ole Opry’ but the flip ‘Black Widow Heart’ a song about a girl who only wants to break his heart, this is a mighty fine tune and Max handles the vocals with ease and the whole thing shuffles along just right with some lovely steel and brush work on the snare drum.

« Actions« 

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« Black widow heart« 

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Max was married to Norma Hedrick around this period and I do not know of any other releases by Max which is a shame as he had a decent voice.

The final two releases that I know of have the change in label colour and the Kall logo is smaller . The address has changed to PO Box 374, Travellers Rest, SC. This town is situated just north of Greenville.

Kall # 805 signifies a change in address and numbering system but strangely back to being published by ‘Duride’ (Dudley/Riddle). LESTER ELLER hits us with ‘The Fox Chase’ B/w ‘Chicken Reel’. I am yet to hear either but I imagine these are again country tunes from probably 1962 .

TOMMY HOOPER and The Nashville South are next with Kall # 6780 ?. The A side ‘Since You’ve Been Gone’ B/w ‘Sunshine Girl’ are again unknown to me but I do know that Tommy and the group also saw releases on ‘Mowhawk’ and ‘Jed’ labels in the mid 70’s. I don’t think he was connected to or a relation to Wallace Hooper who had a release on Kall # 0042 but I cannot be sure.

If anybody has any further information on further releases or artists connected with the Kall label then please let me know.

 

Well done, Mick! Thank you.

Early March 2017 bopping hillbilly fortnight’s favorites

courtesy HillbillyBoogie1 YouTube chain

This fortnight’s favorite selection begins in a State not usually associated with Hillilly bop, that of Connecticut in the North east part of the U.S. Issued on the Starday custom Coxx label (# 588, September 1956), it hailed from Coventry and was allocated to SLIM COXX and his Cowboy Caravan. I remember the notes to Coxx 588 from the « Starday custom # 575-600 » study I had back in January 2012. « Slim’s real name was Gerard A Miclette. He played with his younger brother, Roland « Rocky » Miclette in various bands. By the time Roland came back from serving in the Navy, he joined Slim (who played fiddle like his father, George) playing bass in Slims’ Kentucky Ramblers. Eventually they came to the attention of the Down Homers, which featured Bill Haley (and Kenny Roberts) and joined them on the tidy sum of $200 a week wages. Once the Down Homers had disbanded, Slim & Rocky were playing at Lake Compounce in Slim’s new band, The Cowboy Caravan. » 

« Lonely nights »

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« Sitting here all alone »

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»Lonely nights » is a perfect hillbilly shuffler: the vocalist has a top notch « hillbilly » voice, and steel/fiddle are both great. Rocky died on the 6th of May 2004 and Slim passed away October 13th 1999. The actual band singer was a Jimmy Stephen, who led vocals also on the other issue (either 1955, either 1957) by Coxx on the Maine Event label (# 4267), »Sitting here all alone ».

 

 

 

 

On to Dallas, Texas, and the great JOHNNY HICKS & the Country Gentlemen, recently evoked in my study of Hank Thompson’s « The Wild Side Of Life » and his sequels. Here he delivers a proto-rockabilly with « Pick up blues », great vocal and fine guitar (Columbia 21064) cut late 1952.

« Pick up blues »

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Talking of « The wild side of life », here is an unusual Cajun version sung in French by MARIE FALCON fronting Skuk Richard‘s band, The LA. Aces, under the title « Le cote farouche de la vic », which was issued early in 1953.

« Le cote farouche de la vic »

courtesy earlyCajun (Wade Falcon)

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Then a completely unknown artist by the name of TIM McCLOUD on the Chesterfield label #362 on the West coast. McCloud reminds vocally one of Rex Allen for two selections, « Down Down Down » and « Mountains and mountains of lies » , both urban hillbilly style with a distinct California Western savour. Young Buck Owens had a record on that label too. The writer, Virginia Richmond, was also the owner of the label.

« Down down down »

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« Mountains and mountains of lies« 

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Back to Texas, Houston area with the singer/fiddler COTTON THOMPSON. He already had the fast Western swing-tinged « Jelly Roll Blues » in 1949 on Freedom 5010, and later went as front vocalist for Johnny Lee Wills (« Oo Oooh Daddy » on RCA 5243). Here after train effects Thompson sings with urgency a fast song – already a small classic – « How Long » (Gold Star 1381) ; flipside « Hopeless Love » is a fine shuffler : fiddle is well to the fore. Thompson is backed by an otherwise unknown to me « Deacon (Rag Mop) Anderson » and his own Village Boys.

                                        « How long »

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« Hopeless love« 

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Hillbilly BILL HALEY used to adapt race songs to his Country repertoire. Here he goes strong with the Saddlemen on Holiday 105 (July 1951) with «Rocket « 88 » », which has been often cited as the first Rock’n’roll record by Ike Turner‘s band (The Delta Cats) fronted by JACKIE BRENSTON on Chess 1458.

Bill Haley « Rocket « 88« 

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Jackie Brenston « Rocket « 88 »

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Sources : mainly 45-cat, 78rpm-world and YouTube ; my own archives. Wade Falcon’s « earlycajunmusic » blogsite for Khoury’s issue. 

JACK TUCKER, « Big Door » , « Honey Moon Trip To Mars » and « Lonely Man » (1949-1961)

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It’s hard to figure out what’s going on here. There were four versions of « Big door »…a sort-of « Green door » sequel.The first version appeared in 4 Star’s AP (Artist Promotion) and was by the writer, Gene Brown. Some say that Eddie Cochran is on guitar. That version reappeared on 4 Star (# 1717) and reappeared yet again identical on Dot, the label that had scored with « Green door ». At almost the same time, circa April 1958, that 4 Star licensed Brown’s master to Dot, Jack Tucker‘s version appeared. Was this the same Jack Tucker who worked hillbilly nighspots in Los Angeles for many years ? Probably. According to Si Barnes, who worked for both Jack Tucker (real name Morris Tucker) and his brother, Hubert, aka Herb [« Habit forming kisses » on Excel 107, 1955: see elsewhere in this site the Rodeo/Excel story], the Tuckers were from Haleyville, near Oklahoma City . Jack (rn Morris) was born on April 19th, 1918.

Gene Brown « Big door« 

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Jack Tucker « Big door« 

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 Both brothers led bands in Los Angeles, playing spots like the Hitching Post, Harmony Park Ballroom, and so on. Jack had a Saturday night television show on Channel 11. Tommy Allsup graduated from Herb Tucker’s band, and according to Barnes, Herb led the more musically sophisticated outfit. Jack Tucker, said Barnes was  « pretty much stuck on himself. A very basic guitar player and vocalist. He was really limited in musical talent. I’m surprised he let the band record [Bob Wills‘] « Big beaver » [at the same session as « Big door »]. He didn’t understand the Wills beat or anything about that style. Jack was a two-chord guy. Both Herb and Jack faded out in the early 1960s when the ballrooms closed or switched over to rock ».

1940 issue

« Big beaver »

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Nevertheless, Tucker’s recording career was quite extensive. There was a demo session for Modern in 1949 and his first 4 Star record was a reissue of a 1953 disc for the 4* custom Debut label. Other records, usually with the Oklahoma Playboys, appeared on Starday (1954), RCA’s « X » imprint (1955), Downbeat, with Bob Stanley (1956), Audie Andrews on Debut, himself on Bel Aire and Nielsen (1957). Guitarist Danny Michaels remembered that Tucker was playing at the Pioneer Room on Pioneer Blvd, when they did the 4 Star session. According to Michaels, he played lead and Al Petty played steel guitar, but he couldn’t remember the others. Following Tucker’s brief tenure with 4 Star, he recorded for Ozark Records in South Gate, California. One of their singles (with Don Evans on lead guitar),    « Lonely man » was acquired by Imperial. Another, « Honey moon trip to Mars », may have been revived by Larry Bryant (Santa Fe 100, or Bakersfield 100).

« Lonely man« 

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« Honey moon trip to Mars »

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Larry Bryant « Honey moon trip to Mars« 

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Tucker appears to have bowed out with a clutch of records for Toppa in 1961-1962, and later for Public! and Young Country. He had backed Lina Lynne (later on Toppa 1008) on Jimmy O’Neal‘s Rural Rhythm label, and Bill Bradley on Fabor Robinson‘s Fabor label in 1957-58.

Lina Lynne « Please be mine »

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Bill Bradley « Drunkard’s diary« 

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Tucker died on September 26, 1996, but no one has an idea what he was doing between the mid-60s and his death.

Notes by Colin Escott to « That’ll flat git it vol. 26 » (Four Star). Additions by Bopping’s editor.


 

 

The music of Jack Tucker (by Bopping’s editor)

To follow Barnes’ assertion about limitations both on guitar and vocal of Jack Tucker, one must although admit his discs were good enough to have him a comfortable discography over the years 1953-1965. I cannot at all judge his talent but I’d assume his music is generally pretty good hillbilly bop or rockabilly.

First tracks I discuss are his « X » sides (# 0093) from 1954 : the fast « Stark, staring madly in love» has a tinkling piano and a loping rhythm, a fine side, and the equally good « First on your list » (much later re-recorded on Public!). Both are billed X songs by Allan Turner.

« Stark, staring madly in love »

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« First on your list« 

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This is without forgetting two 1949 demo tracks for Modern : apparently Dusty Rhodes is on lead guitar for the instrumental « Dusty road boogie », and Jack Tucker is vocalist for a version of Hank Williams’ « Mind your own business ».

Later on, we had Tucker on Starday 136 : « Itchin’ for a hitchin ‘ » and « I was only fooling me », typical hillbillies on the Beaumont, TX label – probably recorded on the West coast, as later did Jack Morris [see the latter’s story elsewhere in this site].

Billboard April 14, 1954

« I was only fooling me« 

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More earlier on the 4 Star OP (« Other People ») custom Debut label (# 1001), later reissued on the regular 4 Star X-81, Tucker had cut in 1954 « Too blue to cry », a good song with band chorus, and had backed a fellow Oklahomian Audie Andrews on the same Debut label (One side written by NY entrepreneur Buck Ram).


« Too blue to cry« 

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In 1956 Bob Stanley [not to be confused with the pop orchestra leader] on Downbeat 204 had « Your triflin’ ways/Heartaches and tears », backed by Tucker and his Oklahoma Playboys : two very nice Hillbilly boppers: Stanley adopts the famous growl-in-his-voice, a speciality of T. Texas Tyler. Both of them had also a disc on Downbeat 203 (still untraced). Jack Tucker backed also in 1957 Lina Lynne on the fine bopper « Pease be mine » (Rural Rhythm 513 [see above].

« Your triflin’ ways »

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« Heartaches and tears »

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Same year 1957 saw Tucker record two sides among his best on the small California Bel Aire (# 22) label, « Let me practice with you » and « Surrounded by sorrow », good mid-paced boppers (fine steel). His band, « The Okla. Playboys« , backed Roy Counts on two excellent boppers on Bel Aire 23: the medium-paced « I ain’t got the blues« , and the faster « Darling I could never live without you« , both have strong steel guitar. Tucker also had  « Hound dog » on the Nielsen 56-7 label (untraced).

« Let me practice with you »

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« Surrounded by sorrow »

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Roy Counts, « I ain’t got no blues »

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Roy Counts, « Darling I could never live without you »

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Billboard, No. 11, 1957

 

 

 

 

 

1958 saw the issue of « Big door » already discussed earlier (plus the B-side « Crazy do » a good instrumental), as the other 4 Star record, « Big beaver /Nobody’s fool» (4 Star # 1728), both average instrumental sides.

In 1959 Tucker had three records on the Ozark label. The original of « Honey moon trip to Mars » (# 960) [later by Larry Bryant on Santa Fe/Bakersfield – otherwise, who came first?]

« Honey moon trip to Mars »

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Larry Bryant « Honey moon trip to Mars »

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then « Lonely man » (# 962), which was picked by Imperial and reissued (# 5623), finally # 965 and the ballads « Don’t cry for me/Trade wind love ».

 

insert of an Ozark issue, found on the Net

In 1960-1961 Tucker had four Toppa records. All are fine boppers, despite a tendancy to go pop, and include Ralph Mooney on steel guitar at least on # 1030 : « Oh what a lonely one ; one is » , « When the shades are drawn »          (# 1041),  « Just in time » (# 1052) and « It’s gone too far » (# 1106).

« Oh what a lonely one; one is »

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« Just in time« 

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« It’s gone too far »

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I mention quickly the following issues, less and less interesting (more and more poppish) on Public! (a new version of « First on your list ») and Young country (even an LP # 103) along the ’60s.
« First on your list »

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Sources: Colin Escott notes to « That’ll flat git it vol. » (Four Star); 45cat and 78-world sites; Toppa’s best 3-CD;; Roots Vinyl Guide; YouTube; Praguefrank’s country discography (discography); my own archives and records;

Late February 2017 bopping fortnight’s favorites

First two selections for this late February 2017 fortnight do come from Florida. Absolutely nothing is known from the vocalist/bandleader JOE ASHER. Apparently unknown on the Net, and not associated to another of the same name, he was a one-off record man. His record was first issued at Rockin’ # 515 in 1953, then reissued by DeLuxe ( # 2001) for a perfect Bopper, « Photograph of you », a fast, fantastic tune : very assured vocal, great solos – fiddle, guitar and steel. The flipside, « Daddy dear », a mid-paced opus, is just as good (steel is prominent). I wonder why this guy never recorded more, at least under his name.

« Photograph of you« 

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« Daddy dear »

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Next selection : BOB DEAN & the Travelaires give a solid rocker for October 1958, issued at the Philly label Arcade (# 195). « Hot Rod Daddy », of course a car song, has a guitar a la Chuck Berry, a prominent piano and a great vocal. This Bob Dean was also on a much later label, Artisty (’70s), and is not to be confused with Bob Dean of the « BOB & CINDY DEAN » Bluegrass duet from Virginia. They had more than a link with guitarist Link Wray : they shared an EP with him, and issued on their side « Walk, walk, walkin’ blues » (Kay EP 3690) from 1957, a good mix of Bluegrass and Rockabilly. They were also on Starday custom serie # 627, « I’m knocking at the door (of your heart) » – excellent driving banjo. Bob Dean had previously released in 1947 on the Lilian Claiborne D.C. label (# 4101) a very rural outing « I’ll take her from the valley » [for a future fortnight’s favorites].

« Hot rod daddy« 

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« Walk, walk, walkin’ blues« 

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« I’m knocking at the door (of your heart)« 

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Then to early ’60s in Birmingham, AL. with OTHELL SULLIVAN & the Southern All-Stars (are they the house band of the label?) on Reed 1053. The song is written by Leon Bowman, a prolific songster and singer in is own right. « There’s sure to be goodbyes » is a jumping tune, sympathetic backing (steel and discreet drums) over a good vocal : a nice tune for 1961. Sullivan had had already « Call me, baby » on Wonder (unheard) in 1958 ; later he joined the Longhorn stable (# 513).

« There’s sure to be goodbyes »

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JIMMIE STONE (acc. by Coy McDaniel guitarist) had on the New Jersey Cross Country label 45-22 a great Country rocker, « Found » in April ’56. Strong lead guitar and good backing over an assured vocal (lot of echo). The disc must have had a certain impact under chart-angle, because the big N.Y. concern Gone reissued it next year as it was on Gone # 5001. The flipside « Mine » is an insipid slowie, largely forgettable.

« Found »

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From Indiana on a rather devoted to Blues/R&B label, Falcon, here’s to be found the Hillbilly bopper/Rockabilly of CURLEY SHELTON (# 609) « with Doug Oldham & his Dixie 6 ». « Have you seen my baby » is a medium bluesy tune, assured vocal and an embroidering very good guitar.

« Have you seen my baby »

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From the Hometown Jamboree on the West coast, the next track by TEX HOLLAND. He does a fine job with the mid-paced hard-driven « Why don’t you change your ways » on Ivory 103. 

« Why don’t you change your ways »

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Finally a song, « Hillbilly wolf », wrongly attributed to Dave Dudley on a low-bdget album cover, is actually sung and played by LINK WRAY. A medium uptempo, good vocal but rather uninspired guitar. This tune may come from the late ’50s or even the early ’60s.

« Hillbilly wolf »

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Sources : 45cat.com and 78rpm-world, Rockin’ Country Style, Hillbilly Researcher compilations, YouTube and my own archives.