Late November 2017 bopping fortnight’s favorites (late ’40s to mid-’60s)

MERLE KILGORE is not a newcomer. He met in the ’60s and ’70s a lot of success as a songwriter in Nashville : wrote « Ring of Fire » for Johnny Cash, and « Wolverton mountain » for Claude King. But I am more interested with his beginnings for Imperial records, seemingly all cut at KWKH in Shreveport, La. Here’s « Everybody needs a lttle lovin’ » that Merle released on # 8300. A Rockabilly guitar

 

Tillman Franks on double bass with Johnny Horton

 

(fine solo), propelled by a thudding bass (Tillman Franks?) over an urgent vocal. Later Wyatt Merle Kilgore (his actual name, being born in Chickasaw, OK. In 1934) turned frankly towards Rock’n’roll with tunes like « Please please please », cut in New Orleans in Jan. 1956 with an-all Black group, that of Dave Bartholomew, and « Ernie » . So eclectic was the man ! He was also a board member of the Hank Williams Montgomery museum, being very close to Hank’s family. He was back to his Country roots in 1959 with Country rockers on the « D » label (‘Take a trip to the moon »). Died of a lung cancer in 2005.

« Everybody needs a little lovin’ »

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I didn’t find anything on the next artist : TROY JORDAN & His Cross-B-Boys, except to location of the label: Midland, Texas. So can only comment both sides of his disc issued on Tred-Way 100. The A-side is a good uptempo, « Who Flung that mater », with a too-discrete steel-guitar and well-sung, although nothing rxceptional. B-side is really fine bluesy a tune: guitar, steel, a piano solo, lazy vocal for « Don’t cry on my shoulder ». Jordan was a distant cousin of the Carter Sisters, so it may be they are the right way for a research on him.

« Who flung that mater »

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« Don’t cry on my shoulder »

download= » »>« Texas Millionaire » (Decca 30332, issued 1957) by TABBY WEST is a fast Hillbilly bopper cut in Nashville on January 8, 1956. The voice fits perfectly with the backing instruments, which take the better part of the song : all in all, their solos are beginning at 0’41 et ending at 1’20..West was born in Kingston Springs, TN. and found her way easily to Nashville for a first recording contract in 1954 on Coral Records. There she was paired with Texas Bill Strength (on Coral reords), and backed by the cream of Nashville musicians. I’d like very much to hear « Hillbilly Blues » (Decca 29822) which sounds very promising..

« Texas Millionaire« 

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There may be more than a handful of « Atomic » labels after WWII. This one emanates from Hollywood, Ca. MEL GRIGGS & His Sons of the Saddle released « Goin’ back to Texas » (# 240) seemingly in the late ’40s – the style is easily reconizable, that of a « Cityzed » Hillbilly, with Western Swing overtones. I don’t know anything on this ensemble, and found it a gentle uptempo ; vocal is firm, and reinforced by the group in unison during the breaks. Griggs persevered with « Watchin’ the clouds roll by » (# 241).

« Goin’ back to Texas« 

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HILLBILLY HERMAN, & his Tennessee Valley Boys, despite his name, is a Blugrass artist in 1966, who offers « Today I watched my dreams come true » (Breeze 366, located in Livingston, TN), a solid uptempo, with great backing in the background The main instrument is a very nice mandolin ; alas the guitar solo is very insipid. The Breeze label had issued a very rocking version of « Wreck of the old 97 » (# 381) by Jim Sebastian. A record to watch for. In the meantime, do YouTube searching! Herman had an elusive issue on Hatfield (no #)[untraced]

« Today I watched my dream come true« 

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Maybe « Hayride boogie » rings a bell for you ? You may remember I had posted the Webb Pierce Story (1949-1950) during the past years ; For contractual reasons (Pierce was still under sontract with 4*), his product was issued under various names, whose this one : TILLMAN FRANKS. Bass player, entrepreneur, band leader, he played a pivotal role in the emergence of the rising « Louisiana Hayride » during the early ’50s. On Pacemaker 1011b, this is a boogie pattern with great guitar by Buddy Attaway [see with the « Artists » search button above for his story]. Indeed there was no place for Tex Grimsley (fiddle) neither Shot Jackson (steel). Pierce re-recorded the song as « Teenage boogie » in 1957, and Franks continued to slap his bass and entertain until the ’80s.

« Hayride boogie« 

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Next artist in discussion will be WHITEY KNIGHT from California, or better say, recording for a Californian label, that of Nielsen. « From an angel to a devil » (# 57/1-2) has steel well to the fore, a relaxed hillbilly bop rhythm : a natural feeling. Not a great disc, but a good one ! Knight had also a rich recording career, appearing on Dot, Sage and Dart.

« From an angel to a devil »

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FRED NETHERTON gives us a fabulous rocker with his version of Carl Perkins’ « Matchbox » : great swooping and hammering piano, a very fine guitar solo, a terrific vocal on Rural lRhythm 540B. A must have ! « Matchbox« 

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Sources : as usual, Internet (45cat, or Youtube) and my own archives. Decca and Imperial data do come from Michel Ruppli’s books. Pictures of Tillman Franks come drom Now Dig This (a 1995 issue).

Late September 2017 bopping and moving fortnight’s favorites (1950-1965)

 

Howdy, friends ! This is the last selection of fortnight’s favorites for September 2017. I didn’t post a fortnight selection early this month, I was away from my Macintosch and could not but release the story of Freddie Frank, a Texan Hillbilly bopper – I hope you visiting friends and followers have just noticed the article…and liked it! I will be out once more during October, and don’t know how I will manage the blog. In the meantime here I am and well, and ready for this late September 2017 selection, which will last from the early ’50s until 1965.

Here we go with the earliest track, « Why not » on the B&C label # 500 by PAPA CAIRO (misspellt Cario on the label). Indeed he was a Louisianian. Real name Julius Lamperez. He was a steel guitar player and band leader during the early fifties (records on Feature and Colonial among others) and was long associated with the Cajun Chuck Guillory (« Grand Texas » on Modern 612). Here he delivers a decent uptempo ballad, a bit crooning, piano-led with fiddle and steel solo.

« Why not« 

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« Be my Baby »

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« Great Big Moon« 

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From Marshall, Missouri on the Jan label (# 6-58) two tracks by F. D. JOHNSON with the Missouri Valley Boys. First « Be my baby » is a well-tempered (as you would say for Bach’s harpsichord – rock on, J.-S. !) rockabilly with vocal hiccups and a nice guitar solo. The flipsde is « Great big moon », and a good hillbilly weeper : vocal, fiddle solo. One little record to watch, and one wonders if he did something else.

« Mop Bop Boogie »

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« Ramblin’ Blues »

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On the Black side (or the man is White??? vocally he sounds at last) with WILBUR STEINBERG on the Memphis, TN, Hut label (# 4401) for a fast side, « Mop bop boogie », a mover with sax and screams, then a bluesy uptempo « Ramblin’ blues », which goes for the same comment. Two good sides !

Then on to Del Rio, Texas on the Hacienda label. Here he comes, SKEET WILLIAMS for a pleasant ballad (with chrorus and steel), « Lonesome rain » (# 0001). He’s backed by Bob Haltern’s Swing Kings, moreover a band unknown to me. The side was released in 1965 and coupled with « Mary, Mary, Mary Jane », a fast Rockabilly belter with chorus and loud drums. Thanks bebopcapitol !The record had apparently an early release on Royal Scot 102.

« Lonesome rain« 

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« Mary, Mary, Mary Jane« 

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We are reaching the end with VON STEPHENS on the Karl label (London, OH) and « Huckleberry junction » : a decent Hillbilly bopper, steel is present, a short guitar solo. Clay Eager production : someday, I will search on the very interesting Clay Eager.

« Huckleberry Junction »

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That’s all folks. Thanks for your comments, corrections or additions. Sources: as diverse as usual.

Early July 2017 bopping and rocking fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks. This is the first of July 2017 bopping fornight’s favorites. And this will be a special issue, focusing on Rockabilly and/or Hillbilly Rock records of high value. If you’re lucky owning them, it’s good. On the other hand, if you have only a portion, or lacking one particular item, start hunting ! Estimated values are going from Barry K. John collector guide (BJK), and Tom Lincoln/Dick Blackurn reference book « Guide to rare Rockabilly and Rock’n’roll 45rpms » (TL/DB).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s begin with the Alabama Reed 400b label, « Coal miner’s blues » by GENE COLE. It’s a great mid-tempo opus, a Country rocker with good guitar and fine voice, valued $ 200-250 (BJK), or even the more confortable tag of 800-1000 (TL/DB).


« Coal miner’s blues »

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Next is very short : 1 minute 37, but full of energy. JERRY PITTS & the Rhythm Makers do on the J.P.R.M. label (obviously initials of them all) the fine up-tempo « Keep ole central rolling » from Dawson, MS. Uncommon maraccas. This record go for $ 40-50 (BJK) or even 75-100 (TL/DB).

« Keep ole central rolling »

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FRED NETHERTON appears on two discs. First a great version of Carl Perkins’ « Matchbox » on California label Rural Rhythm EP 540, from 1961, backed by the Wildwood Playboys: piano and guitar solos. Valued at $ 300-400 (TL/DB). Then as fronting man for the Wildwood Trio on Dixie 1 (unknown serie) from Illinois, says Barry K. John. « The wildwood rock » with a very nasal voice, a great rockabilly guitar, a really stomping thing, It’s valued between $ 300 and 400 by B.J K.., and 600-700 by TL/DB.

« Matchbox »

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« The wildwood rock« 

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Next entry is the exception. SUNSHINE SUE had this Astra issue (probably Richmond, Va.) circa 1948-49. « Barn dance boogie » (# 1215) with the first ever recording of ‘Cousin’ Joe Maphis. Fast romper, an accordion solo, and that agile guitar throughout.

« Barn dance boogie »

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From Tennessee comes BROWNIE JOHNSON for the medium uptempo – good vocal, nice guitar – « The sun would never shine » on the Lynn label # 101B. Valued (TL/DB) at $ 100-125.

« The sun would never shine »

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The name BINK BURNS is not a common one, on the Oklahoma Rose label (# 127) : « Muddy river » has a slow rhythm, a threatening vocal and a fine guitar. It’s valued $ 60-75 (BJK).

« Muddy river« 

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Finally two discs by SLIM DORTCH from Tennessee. The very great « Big boy rock » on Eugenia 1001 from 1961 : $ 600-800 (BJK). His second is very tame in comparison, « Sixteen miles » is a honest little rocker without any more appeal.


« Big boy rock »

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« Sixteen miles« 

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Portland, OR. Country rock: JOHNNY SKILES (1958-59)

skiles assisFrom Monroe, La, JOHNNY SKILES enlisted in WWII at the age of 17. After the war, he moved from Beaumont, Texas to New Orleans, constantly writing songs and playing his guitar.

His brother-in-law (from Monroe) was Jack Hammons, who co-wrote with him and recorded « Mr. Cupid » for Starday (# 197) in 1955. Col. Tom Parker came through Monroe one day, heard Hammons sing Skiles’ original compositions, and quickly phoned Jack Starnes at Starday to arrange a session.

starday 197 jack hammons - Mr. Cupid

Jack Hammons « Mr. Cupid »

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Johnny Skiles was signed to a songwriter’s contract by Southern-Peer in 1955, although unfortunately nothing ever resulted from it.

Skiles then moved to Oregon (he worked for the U.S. Post Office) in the mid-to-late fifties. His first record was a Starday custom 45, « The twinkle in your eyes/Ghosts of my lonely past », released on Corvette 672 circa 1958. Bob Hill and his Harmony Ranch Hands backed Skiles on these appealing boppers. He was influenced by Hank Williams and Webb Pierce, his boyhood friend from Monroe, on his C&W material.

« The twinkle in your eyes »

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« Ghosts of my lonely past »

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corvette 672b johnny skiles - ghosts of my lonely pastcorvette 672a johnny skiles - the twinkle in your eyes

His next outing was Rural Rhythm 518 « Is my baby coming back/Come paddle footin’ down », cut at Portland Ace studio, and released by Jim O’Neal, the late, colorful country DJ/entrepreneur from Arcadia, California. There are distinct echoes of Johnny Cash on these Skiles Rural Rhythm sides, despite chorus. Another Rural Rhythm, EP 37 ½, had 6 tracks among them « Sundown road » [unheard] by Skiles and Bob Hill.

Then he appeared on the good bopper « Blue shadows » (Rumac OP-287).

 

 

« Is my baby coming back »

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« Come paddle footin’ down »

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« Blue shadows »

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rural rhythm 618a johnny skiles - is my baby comin' backrural rhythm 518B johnny skiles - come paddle footin' downrumac 287 johnny skiles - blue shadows

Rockabilly fans and collectors will be more interested in Johnny Skiles’ Rumac R&R session : « Hard luck blues/Rockin’ and rollin’ » was issued on a Four Star custom pressing as Rumac OP-301 in 1959. Johnny played rhythm guitar, accompanied by his fellow Bob Hill on his custom-made 8-string Fender. « Rockin’ and rollin’ » comes as a lovely Country-rocker – good lead guitar and a lazy rhythm. Ruby Smith owned the Rumac label, although Bill McCall, the owner of Four Star, claimed co-writing credits in his usual fashion as « W. S. Stevenson ». (He was doing that possibly inspired by the « Josea-Ling-Taub » of the Modern label’s Bihari brothers, or maybe more « D.Malone », the nom-de-plume of Duke/Peacock’s Don Robey).

rumac 301 johnny skiles - hard luck bluesrumac 301 johnny skiles - rockin' and rollin'

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billboard; June 6, 1959

« Rockin’ and rollin (A two tone beat)‘ »

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« Hard luck blues »

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Two unissued tunes, « Red headed woman » and « Rock jump boogie » were also recorded at the Ace Portland session : both are gentle Country-rockers, with Bob Hill’s inventive and agile guitar well to the fore. They sound demos. 500 copies of « Hard luck blues » were pressed, and intended also as a demo and showcase. In 1959 also, Johnny fronted vocally the group of the Echomores for « What-cha-do-in » on the Portland, OR. Rocket label # 1044). It’s a fast bopper/rocker with a very nice steel (solo), a good lead guitar and a solid rhythm throughout the song. Skiles get a girl replica near the end. A very fine record by him for the era. Thanks to CheesebrewWax Archive Youtube chain for unearthing such unknown goodies! From unknown origin/date (a Jim O’Neal recording), the White label album contained one more by Skiles,   « If your telephone rings », a fast Rockabilly type song.

« Red headed woman »

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« Rock jump boogie »

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The Echomores (Johnny Skiles, vo) »What-cha-do-in »

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rocket 1044 echomores -what-cha-do-in

After that, Skiles and Bob Hill teamed with Leighton Atkins on organ and Gene Cipolloon on guitar for a serie of Country instrumentals, which were released on some EP’s by Jim O’Neal, sent to D.J.s in the manner of Starday. This way Skiles received a little money, more than from his records. These Eps were used by D.J.s to segue from one segment of commercial to the next, and were released on Rural Rhythm and, yes another O’Neal label, Honey-B. I include a solitary Honey-B 102 issue for the interesting « Comin’ home to you », a medium-paced Rockabilly, despite the girl chorus by the Tonettes.

« Comin’ home to you »

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« If your telephone rings »

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Skiles and his group kept on performing throughout the 60s and 70s on the Pacific Northwest. That’s all is known of him.

skiles & group

 

From the notes (by Cees Klop apparently) of the album White label 8967 « The original Johnny Skiles », published 1991. Additions by bopping Editor. Original labels from 45-cat. Thanks to UncleGil to have provided me the WL album.

BILL MORGAN a.k.a. BILL CARROLL: Feel so good

a.

No image available of the boys neither of Bill Morgan at the moment. Maybe someone has one picture? Pease help!

This Bill Morgan has nothing to do with the Columbia songwriter and artist (1954-55), brother to George Morgan.

By the mid-1955, Texans Bill [Morgan, rhythm guitar] and Carroll [Hunt, lead guitar] came from Beaumont, Texas, to Lake Charles’ (La.) Goldband recording studio and cut their first sides. They were issued on Goldband 1034 early 1956, comprised of two Hillbilly boppers tunes : « Love me just a little bit » has harmony vocals in the bridge, the rest goldband-1034a-bill-carroll-love-me-just-a-little-bitgoldband-1034b-bill-carroll-my-blue-letter

« Love me just a little bit »

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« My blue letter »

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being sung by Bill Morgan ; fine backing of fiddle and steel by the Netche Valley Boys; « My blue letter » is faster and equally good. The boys try with brio to sing harmony all along the track. Again great aggressive fiddle, as on « Honest to goodness baby » (Goldband 1053) issued 1957. The B-side « Love grown cold » is a slowie ; the vocals are plaintive but the spirit (a piano is added) of the other sides remain intact.

goldband-1053a-bill-carroll-honest-togoodness-babygoldband-1053b-bill-carroll-love-grown-cold

« Honest to goodness baby »

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« Love grown cold »

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Departing from Goldband Bill & Carroll left behind them 5 unissued songs only published in France and U.K. during the late ’80s. A first version of the future Dixie classic « Feel so good« , a perfect example of Hillbilly bop heading towards Rockabilly (great guitar and fiddle backing).The medium paced « Shadow on my heart » is reminiscent of « Love grown cold », but a little faster. Enters even an accordion player. Some mambo rhythm for « Boo hoo », then « Hold me baby » is a fast number, quasi-rockabilly (at least for the guitar playing), a bit Everly-ish. The last tune, « Bluff city rock » is pure rock’n’roll, with heavy drums and tickling piano, and again that fine guitar.

« Feel so good« (1956 version)

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« Shadow on my heart »

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« Boo hoo« 

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« Hold me baby« 

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« Bluff city rock« 

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Next step was on Madison, TN, Dixie label. Both of the guys were reunited under the name « BILL CARROLL » for a second version of their previous « Feel so good » (Dixie 2010) – a sharp lead guitar, and a firm vocal. This is the best ever of their product – value $ 300-400, and one would hear their B-side « In my heart » , not available since its November 1958 issue.

dixie-2010-bill-varroll-feel-so-good

« Feel so good »

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d-1092-bill-morgan-your-wicked-love

courtesy Udo Frank

From then on, it seems that both of them went separate ways, as further recordings are all assigned to « BILL MORGAN ». First in 1959 (reviewed by Billboard in August) on Pappy Daily’s « D » label (# 1092) . « Your wicked love » is a fast bopper: clear voice, nice backing of piano and an ordinary guitar, probably not by Carroll Hunt. Things are slower for the flipside « At home with mom », full of echo. Next step is on the Dart label (a sublabel to « D ») for « Red hot rhythm combo » (# 137) in 1960 : a good jumping little rocker. The guitar riff is fine and insistant, and Morgan is in good voice.

« Your wicked love »

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« Red hot rhythm combo« dart-137-bill-morgan-red-hot-rhythm-combo

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The man moved again to Texas, and had a good amount of recordings until 1972, when his trail goes cold. On Delta Records, he had late 1962 # 501 « I need your love » picked up by Chess and reissued on # 1841, a good little rocker. Then on Delta 504 in 1963, « She gave me lovin’ », once more a fine rocker. Then on Gem (1964-65) a similar instrumentation for the energetic « Tennessee moon » (# 5) or the lovely (female chorus) « Land of the midnight sun » (# 7)(not posted here). I did not hear further recordings on New World, Stoneway and Myra, so cannot comment neither podcast them.

chess-1841-bill-morgan-i-need-your-lovedelta-504-bill-morgan-she-gave-me-lovin

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« I need your love »

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« She gave me lovin' »

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« Tennessee moon »

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Another Bill Morgan appeared on Rebel 249 (VA.), who had nothing apparently to do with this artist. Indefatigable visitor (and corrector) DunkenHobo points out a different version of « I need your love »(Chess) by a BOBBIE MORGAN on (Tx) Blackbird 505. It is aurally not an alternate of the Chess issue; a seemingly female vocal; no speeded up tempo I’d assume; and this time a good piano. Producer Bill Morgan, says DrunkenHobo. So maybe Bobbie was his wife? Here it is for what it’s worth:blackbird-505-bobbie-morgan-i-need-your-love

Sources: 45rpm.com site; notes to Goldband LP 107 « Bop stop rock »; notes to BF 16408 « D & Dart »; YouTube.(53jaybop chain for the Goldband 1034 label scans)