Late May 2019 bopping fortnight favorites

Howdy folks! Here we go again for a new selection (rather a short ne) of bopping favorites. They range from late ’40s (Cousin Deems Sanders) to late ’50s (Ray Stone). With the odd issue from Detroit (Peter De Bree) or California (Gene Crabb), they are all Texas records.

Cousin Deems Sanders and his Goat Herders with Walt McCoy

On the then big concern Crystal (# 246), let’s enjoy to the first selection’s choice, “Goatburger Boogie”: a bouncing instrumental. A boogie pattern guitar, a swooping piano and a demented fiddle. McCoy also released “Cowboy Boogie” and “I’m Gonna Get A Honky Tonk Angel”, reviewed in March 2019’s fortnight.

Jill Turner acc. by Art West & his Sunset Riders

From February 1946, on the Urban label (# 111), Jill Turner offer a fast (bit on the novelty side) “I’m Going Down To The Mountain”. A good fiddle, and a fine interplay between accordion and steel. She also had “Yodeling Cow Girl” on Urban 117.

Tony Farr

This artist, billed “And His Swinging Guitar”, comes next with two records on the Enterprise label based in Beaumont, Texas. “What’s The Use” has a nice guitar, but the fiddle is prominent (# 1208) on this 1958 issue, while “There’s No else In Marrying Me” (# 1211) is a jumping tune with a similar instrumentation.

Peter De Bree

In 1957 and Detroit, MI. Peter De Bree cut for Fortune Record (# 193) a rocked up version of the Hank Williams’ classic, “My Bucket’s Got A Hole In It”. A solid piano takes the lead all through, while the guitar is largely overshadowed. Vocal of Bernie Sanders is OK. Nevertheless a good rocker.

Leonard Clark & the Land of Sky Boys

On the small label of Klub # 3108, located in South Carolina, here’s Leonard Clark for the Rockabilly “Come To Your Tommy Now”; assured vocal, good guitar and piano for a 1962 record.

Gene Crabb & his Round Up Rhythm Boys

Rural Rhythm in California was owned by the songwriter Johnny O’Neal, and issued important records by Johnny Tyler, Kenny Smith or Johnny Skiles between 1955 and 1960. Here is Gene Crabb (actually a drummer) and his “Blues Won’t Bother Me” (# 506): bass chords guitar, very effective steel and the good vocal of one Eddie Willis. Crabb had done in ’53 on the Richtone label (# 353, location: Dallas) the very nice “Truck Stop Lucy”, and co-worked with Eddie Miller on 4 *. He released also “Gotta Have A Woman/I’ve tried” on Rural Rhythm 529.

Ray Stone

On T.N.T. 169 (1959) we finally found Ray Stone and “China Doll”, a fine rocker – a clicking guitar. The whole is a complete change with the previous records. He also sang fronting Jerry Dove’s band on # 173 (“Why Don’t You Love Me”).
Sources : my own archives ; HBR for Rural Rhythm; Ultra Rare Rockabilly’s for Leonard Clark; YouTube (Tony Farr, Peter De Bree). Jill Turner picture from “Hop Bop’n’Hop” As you without doubt noticed, I was writing this feature with a lack of inspiration. Be sure however the music comes first. Thanks for forthcoming comments.

Late June 2015 fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks, I am back from Corsica isle (“l’île de Beauté”) where I visited my girl friend and did help her to set up her fairytales’ exhibition in front of children. While I was there I couldn’t get access to my files, thus not allowing to myself to set up early June fortnight’s favorites.

glen reeves2

Glenn Reeves

 

Let’s begin in Texas with GLENN REEVES, born 1932 in Shamrock, TX. He had his first two records on the T.N.T. Label (owned by Bob Tanner, who billed proudly his labels records as « Tanner’n’Texas »!). « I’m Johnny on the spot » (TNT 120) is already a proto-rockabilly classic. But its reverse, the plaintive hillbilly « The blues are out tonight », is not so well known, although a very good ballad. Listen to the real hillbilly pronunciation of Reeves, over a nice fiddle and steel. I love such a record like this. 

The blues are out tonight

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Later he had on TNT 129 « I ain’t got room to rock », before switching to Republic (the great « That’ll be love ») and Atco (« Rockin’ country style »/ »Drinkin’ wine spo-dee-o-dee ») in 1956, yet before turning teen on Decca in 1957. Meanwhile, he had relocated in Florida, pushing himself as a performer and D.J. On WPDQ out of Jacksonvile, FL. That’s where he met Mae Axton, her fellow-composer, and Tommy Durden, who both looked for someone who could demo their « Heartbreak hotel ». At first, Reeves denied, before agreeing – and the result was presented at a Nashville D.J. convention late 1955 to Elvis as his first million seller (the promise of Mae Axton), which he cut January 1956, in a style very close to Reeves. Here is the Reeves’ demo.

tnt reeves  tonight

Glenn ReevesHeartbreak hotel

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The third compere was TOMMY DURDEN. He had a long story as steel player for Tex Ritter, and later for Johnny Cash, and composer (e.g. « Honey bop » for Wanda Jackson). In 1951 on the Sahul Kahal’s Freedom label out of Houston, Texas, he cut the great « Hula boogie » (# 5025). Later on, he had his own version of « Heartbreak hotel » (« Moods » LP, religious songs), before relocating in Michigan. He retired in the early ’90s.

tommy durden

Tommy Durden

 

 

 

Tommy DurdenHula boogie

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freedom durden hula

 

 

On the next artist, GEORGE HEFFINGTON, I know litterally nothing, except he was one of the first to record on the growing Toppa label (owned by Jack Morris, out of Covina, Ca.), and is backed for the fast « Ghost of love » (# 1007, 1958) by, among others, Ralph Mooney on steel. Good piano too.

George HeffingtonGhost of love

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toppa heffington ghost

Real name to next artist was Wilcoxson, but he’s known now as JIMMIE DALE. And there were in the ’50s two different men with the same name. The first to jump on my mind is an Indiana artist, who cut two Starday custom records in 1958. First on Jeffersonville, IN Saber label (# 707), he cut the fabulous two-sider « Baby doll » (great slap bass, energetic drums and lead guitar) and « Darlin’ » (very nice piano, à la Teddy Reddell over a mambo rhythm). In Louisville, KY, he had in 1958 too on the Farrall label (# 687) « Man made moon », more of a country record. Nice vocal, and again a rinky-dink piano and good steel. I couldn’t locate the flipside « For a day ».

The second JIMMIE DALE was a Nashvillian, who cut « Tennessee ghost train » in 1953 on the Original label # 501. The credits don’t give any clue. Lot of echo on the steel, a train song of course.

 

 

jimmie dale

Jimmie Dale (Saber, Farrall)

Jimmie DaleBaby doll

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Jimmie DaleDarlin’

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Jimmie DaleMan made moon

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Jimmie Dale [different artist]”Tennessee ghost train

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saber  dale dollsaber dale Darlin'farral dale moonoriginal dale ghost

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s all for this fortnight, folks. Comments welcome, as usual.

Sources and credits : internet, RCS, Youtube, lot of labor !

Late February 2015 fortnight’s favorites

Hello anybody,

 

En route for a new batch of goodies. I hope you will have as much pleasure to listen to them (or download) as I had chosing them.

Here we go with the same song, a Bluegrass bopper, by its originators first, DON RENO & RED SMILEY in 1957 (banjo and guitar, I’d assume) for King # 5002 : « Country boy rock and roll » combines the energy of both musics for a stupendous number. Two years later, the same tune was revived by a small Maryland duet, FRANKIE SHORT and DEE GUNTER on the Wango label # 200. A very fine version, even faster than the original.

king reno country

wango short - country

Don Reno, Red SmileyCountry boy rock and roll

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Frankie Short & Dee Gunter

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We go up north now for the pure Hillbilly bop beat of « Niagara moon » (Niagara 53727) by ERIC & JOHNNY & Lincoln County Peach Pickers.

Back to Nashville and the Excello label. Indeed it was famous for its Blues and R&B releases, but it had also the odd hillbilly number, for example here RAY BATTS (# 2028) for the great relaxed « Stealin’ sugar ». Batts was also on Bullet and Nashboro.

Eric & JohnnyNiagara moon

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 Ray BattsStealin’ sugar

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niagara  eric & johnny niagara
excello  batts sugar
BILLY McGHEE may have been out of Texas, as he had several records on Imperial. Here on RCA 4727 he cut the good easy-going « I’ll copyright my baby ».

Finally from Texas on the TNT (# 136) label, the only woman of the pack, BETTY BARNES, does offer the fine rockabilly «What would you do ». 

rca  mcghee copyright Billy McGhee, “I’ll copyright my baby

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tnt  barnes - what

Betty BarnesWhat would you do

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Source : Internet.

Other intended features on their way: Valley label, G&G label, early Toppa label, important update of Forest Rye feature, and other articles.

Jacoby Brothers from San Antonio: “Bicycle wreck” (1953-1955)

Jacoby Brothers : They started early and just as quickly disappeared    

Map_of_Texas san antonio

San Antonio, Bexar Cty, Texas

jacoby picture gene&gilbert

Fallen into oblivion, the Jacoby Brothers enjoyed great popularity in the Texas of the 50’s , being one more example of how the music industry suffers in many cases of blindness as to promote artistic talent and it is also true that erroneous decisions made by the brothers led them to a dead end in your career leaving just 12 songs recorded listening today that is not understood as they had no continuity

Gene ( born 1931) and Gilbert ( born 1927) Jacoby  were born in San Antonio (Texas ) in a family eminently musical , embracing Gilbert (nicknamed ” Boy” ) Mandolin ( after taking piano lessons, violin, bass and accordion ) and his brother Gene specializing in the guitar (an instrument used live soon to join the family band ) . The musical influences are brothers , emanating from legends like Jimmie Rodgers. Johnnie & Jack and Homer 

 

& Jethro decisively influenced young people who would soon be part of “The Jacoby Mountain Rhythm Band “  led by the father of the clan, ” Levy ” and mother ” Tommy ” , in addition to supporting a young guitar Larry Nolen ( childhood friend of the brothers, later cutting records for Sarg and Starday ) .

The band soon acquired great notoriety in the city of San Antonio and throughout Texas through its Radio Shows issued by the KONO spreading their sound across the state and getting to share the stage with the legendary Ernest Tubb (the group would never step into a recording studio ) .

Gilbert participation ( Boy ) in World War enlisted in the U.S. Army will mark a before and after in the musical family , not being until 1945 when he was demobilized reunited with his brother starting immediately to act both as the Jacoby Brothers on the local scene in San Antonio .

In 1949 he won a talent contest at the Texas Theatre led by the legendary actor and singer Tex Ritter, luminaire impressed by the talent of the brothers proposes to move to California where under his tutelage and influence in the music industry could be a promising career.

Incredibly the brothers rejected the offer and returned home with the check for $ 10,000 that were awarded as competition winners mentioned above.

Until 1955 they became regulars of the best Clubs of Texas , acting in local and Jowdy ‘s, The Round Up or Circle B.

Stations of the lone star state as WOAI KMAC or spread their sound as well as participating in the popular television program ” Red River Dance” issued by the WOAI -TV ( participated between 1952 and 1954 ) .

The small TNT Records label given the opportunity to record a total of 8 songs that will be distributed to local stations in San Antonio , getting their issues heard in the entire United States through the KMAC (which broadcast on nationwide chain ). The best TNT songs were “Cannonball” (indeed a train song), “Food plan boogie” and the furious “Bicycle wreck”. Also worth a listen are: “There’s no use to go wrong” and “I gave my love a cherry”..

Food plan boogie (TNT 1001)

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There’s no use to go wrong (TNT 1002)

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Cannonball (TNT 1004)

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Warmed over love (TNT 1004)

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Bicycle wreck (TNT 1009)

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tnt jacoby foodTNT jacoby cherrytnt jacoby cannonball
TNT  jacoby doubtful tnt jacoby useThe national broadcast will not fall on deaf ears and will not be long until they receive Decca recording deal , and Columbia , the Brothers opting for the latter in early 1954:  a six-months contract against 2% with four options against 3% of royalties.

In the recording studio in Dallas , the Jacoby Brothers recorded 4 songs (Laredo , Kiss Me Once More, Who’Ye Primpin ‘Fer ? , And One Man’s Opinion) .

Strangely , producer Don Law told them his displeasure with the outcome of the issues, informing them that they would have to re-record all the songs because they had not been hired to lose money .

 Laredo (Columbia 21309)

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Kiss me once again (Columbia 21309)

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Who ye primpin_ fer (Columbia 21359)

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One man_s opinion (Columbia 21359)

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columbia jacoby laredo

 

columbia jacoby primpin

 

On March 29, 1955 they had their second Columbia session. After two songs Don Law told the brothers he was not happy.  An argument followed and the brothers walked out of the studio. The two recorded songs were not issued by Columbia. The harshness with which the brothers had treated its corresponding answer Gene ‘s hand that he told Jacoby Don Law that ” They had come to Dallas with his own money and with their own money could leave.”

The relationship between musicians and record breaking froze and finally end in 1955 when the daughter of 2 years old Gilbert ( Boy ) Jacoby dies, sinking into a deep depression that he will abandon the music dedicated to the regency of a construction company of his own creation until his death in 1992 at 66 years of age.

In contrast , his brother Gene militating continue in music in various bands in San Antonio and getting to spin like electric bassist Charlie Pride Band in Europe , never ceasing to compose and perform until his death in 1997 at age 65 old.

With the perspective that gives us the time , maybe if they had accepted the offer of Tex Ritter juicy his career would come to fruition, or if not so abruptly would have broken relations with Columbia Records … Anyway the quality is evident in his small recorded legacy for posterity.

bell jacoby bicycle

a rare Australian issue!

 

Article taken fromcountry.lacoctelera.net”  blogsite (in Spanish). Label scans come from Allan Turner (TNT 78s + rare mp3) and Willem Agenant (Columbia 45s). Thanks a lot to them. Important addition from faithful visitor Drunken Hobo. Gene Jacoby sang “Duck tail  cat” with Dan Virva & the Flying “D” Ramblers in May 1956 on the Marathon label (# 5002) out of San Antonio. Larry Nolen, who got taught the rhythm guitar by Gene Jacoby, is categoric about it: Dan Virva stole the show to Jacoby. Indeed Larry Nolen had his own version on Starday later this year (“King of the duck tail cats”). Thanks Dean!

Dan Virva: (Gene Jacoby): Duck tail cat

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Jacoby Brothers discography:                                                                                                                                                                                            marathon virva ducktail

TNT studio, San Antonio, Texas, 1953

Gene Jacoby (vo, mandolin), Gilbert (vocal, mandolin), Larry Nolen (rh-g), others unknown.

TNT-1    Food plan boogie (Dave McEnery)                      TNT 1001, Cactus (Rockin’ Hillbilly) 1

TNT-2    There_s no use to go wrong (Gene Jacoby)               1002

TNT-3   I gave my love a cherry (unknown)                               1001

TNT-4

TNT-5  Cannonball (Dave McEnery)                                          1004

TNT-6  Doubtful heart (Gene Jacoby)                                       1009

TNT-7  Warmed over love (Carnes)                                           1004

TNT-8

TNT-9 ? Bicycle wreck  (Boy Jacoby/Scrivner)                     1009, Bell 108

Note1: Willem Agenant writes that the Jacoby Brothers cut in all 16 titles for TNT.

Note 2: Dave McEnery was actually Red River Dave, who had the T.V. show which the Brothers appeared on.

Dallas, Jim Beck Studio, July 29, 1954

same or similar

ZSP 32822 Laredo (E. Jacoby)                                    Columbia 21309

32823   Kiss me once again (E. Jacoby)                                      –

32823   Who ye primpin_ fer (B. Moore)                            21359

32824   One man_s opinion (E. Jacoby)                                   –

 

Dallas, Jim Beck Studio, March 29, 1955

same or similar

unknown title                                                             Columbia unissued

unknown title

San Antonio, May 1956

Dan Virva & the Flying “D” Ramblers. Gene Jacoby (vo), g, b. No audible d.

MR-5002- Duck tail cat (Jacoby/McEnery)    Marathon 5002, Buffalo Bop 55177 (Step out)

Note: According to Larry Nolen, Gene Jacoby did the vocal, not Dan Virva.

Note: all other issues are listed on RCS site under “Dan Virva”.

Note: 5002+ (B-side) has not Gene Jacoby in it.                                                                         –

 

early July 2012 fornight’s favourites

Howdy folks, we embark for a new serie of obscure hillbilly bop records. TED WEST is not an unknown artist. He cut 1952 for Republic in Nashville the fine “She Bent My Pole” and the equally good (with sound effects) “Parking Worries” (see in the site the article on Republic Records, from July 2011). He cut two sessions in 1953-1954 for M-G-M, which I did extract the nice “Call Of The Devil’s Ride” (# 11539) from. Backing accompaniment may be by the Drifting Cowboys. A good shuffler from the days before Nashville was not rotten neither too commercial. (more…)