Late September 2021 bopping fortnight’s favorites

The TURNER BROTHERS (Red & Lige) do provide a « hillbilly novelty » (as shown on the label) which is a fine bopper. They appear also on Radio Artist 234 « Boog-Boog-Boogie »), Bullet 601 (« Guitar Reel »), as backing group for Dwain Bell (Summit 110), and as « Country Dudes » on Azalea 121 (« Have A Ball »). They also were on Bullet 601 (“Guitar Reel”), and on Radio Artist 234 (“Blog, Boog, Boogie”). Suming up, a prolific duet.

The Salem, Virginia HENDER SAUL, apparently a fiddler, does « I Ain’t Gona Rock Tonight », a fine slab of Rockabilly, to be found on Martinville, VA. Liberty 104. He also did, in a more Country mood, the good « Hard Right To My Heart » Liberty 106. On the same Liberty label (also known as Liberty Tone or Mart), on can find Leon & Carlos, the Brammer Brothers (bluegrass), Arnold Terry and others. If you can locate a copy of 104, its price goes up to $ 600-700. Hender Saul was a sideman to Ted Prillaman (bluegrass artist) and later to Raven label.

The third artist is very well known : accordionist and bandleader PEE KING had a long string of realeases between 1947 to 1952 on the RCA-Victor label. In this « Bull Fiddle Boogie », (RCA 20-3232) the vocal duty is held by their regular singer Redd Stewart, and his brother Gene slaps the bass. « Boogie » is typical of late ’40s Country boogie, however medium-paced.

Redd Stewart

From Texas too went the JACOBY BROTHERS. On TNT they had the first issue, « Food Plan Boogie » (1001) by Gene (uncle) and Roy (nephew) were extremely popular in the area with appearances and work for radio KONG. « Foot Plan Boogie » is a lovely bopper sung in duet, as the very, very fast « Bicycle Wreck » (# 1009) : mandolin lead

LOUISIANA LANNIS. On Starday 268. « Much Too Much ».« ( actually A-side) has more than a Latin appeal with its hopping rhythm. On Snow Cap, he also did the great “Tongue Twister Boogie”).

Sources: too many to mention all!

End of 2020 – last December bopping fortnight’s favorites – odds & ends

Rhythm Harmoneers

RHYTHM HARMONEERS on the Jamboree label (not Nashville, but Shreveport, La.) # 2800. Leader was Tom Bearden. « Women Drivers » is the Bill Carlisle song (Mercury). Harmony vocals and a fine guitar on this utptempo. The Harmoneers went also in 1953 on the Flair 1003 (subsidiary label to Modern) with « Good Old Chlororophyll ».

PAUL WILSON on another Louisiana label, Picture # 1001, released 1962 or ’63. « The Blues You Gave Me » is a steel led uptempo (plus solo) with piano, a really moving track. The record was produced by one M. F. Machart, who also produced Sleepy LaBeff « Ride on Josephine » (Picture 1937) Anothee Wilson record was « You Don’t Love Me » (Pcture 1002) – untraced.

Johnny Henderson

The 3 following songs are by JOHNNY HENDERSON, a West coast artist who cut for High Time in 1956-57. Backed by The Texas Hired Hands, he released « The Girl I Love Is n Okie » (# 117), a medium uptempo bopper, lovely rhythm, although no fiddle. B-side is similar in style : « Down Beside The Rio Grande » High Time 118). « Any Old Port In A torm » (High Time 177) is easily found on compilations, not its flipside , a bluesy item with lively vocal « Rocket In My Pocket ».

John R. McKearn

On the Hi-Lite label (Alabama 1959) the team led by JOHN R. McKEARN (backed on side A by Billy Stockstill) offers « All Because Of You » (# 510) : forceful rural vocal, a mid-tempo track, great guitar. The B-side has « The Tug Boast Song » backed by Luden R. Gouedy is uptempo Rockabilly. Same good guitar and piano in the background. This disc is valued at $ 200-300 in Lincoln book.

Hank Dalton

On the (U.S.) London label # 16032 from 1950, on to HANK DALTON & the Brakemen. He was actually Alton Delmore with Ray Smith . Here they do a great train song « Hummingbird Special », same style of the Delmore Brothers.

A nice mid-tempo Rockabilly with Country overtones by the PILGRIM BROTHERS on their own Pilgrim label (# 2001) : « (Slow) Cold Rain ».

Pilgrim Brothers>/span>

Victor Freese

An Hillbilly boppper from North Hollywood : « Let’s Pitch Little Woo » by VICTOR FREESE on the Coin 105 label,1957.

A nice ballad bopper- fiddle – bass chords guitar, then an average solo. It’s KIRMET PHILIPS on Dub 2841 and « Walking Alone Tonight »

From San Antonio, Tx, in August 1960, JOE B. & CHARLIE DAVIS release « Shut Your Big Mouth » on TNT 9033. Good guitar. Flip is a train song, « Mississipi Central ».

Joe B. & Charlie Davis

sources: Gripsweat (Johnny Henderson); Bert Martins’ 1970s’ tapes (Hank Dalton); YouTube (Victor Freese, Rhythm Harmoneers); my own archives.

Made
On a MAC

Late September 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello folks, back from Summer holidays ? En route for the late September 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites’ selection.

Doug Poindexter

June 1954, exactly 18. A newcomer with his first recording. DOUG POINDEXTER came from Vendale, Arkansas. Several months ago, as he had went to Memphis, he had been noticed by a guitar player, Scotty Moore – surely the name rings a bell – and hired as front guitar man of his group, the Starlight Wranglers. His voice was very nasal, without doubt as imitation of his idol Hank Williams. On this day, he cut two sides, whose I retain « Now She Cares No More» under the producer Sam Phillips, hence Sun 202.

The record, albeit reviewed by the famous Cash Box magazine, went nowhere, and Poindexter earned his life later as a successful insurance man. « Now She Cares… » is pure hillbilly bop heaven. Fiddle and steel to the fore, and heavy bass (Bill Black). Less than 2 weeks later Black and Moore backed young Elvis. The rest is history.

Bobby Wayne

From the Washington State in 1963, here’s the very Johnny Cash styled BOBBY WAYNE. « Big Train » first on Jerden 709. During the flipside, « The Valley », the guitarist even adopts Luther Perkins (Cash’ guitarist) licks. Good vocal on both sides, and discrete chorus.

In the December 2016 fortnight I came with Californian Western swing artist EDDIE DEAN and his « Rock’n’Roll Cowboy » on Sage from 1957. Here is a quieter thing (Sage 188) : « Impatient Blues » as its name doesn’t imply is a bluesy thing, nice steel and a bit of crooning.

Eddie And Chuck

« The Louisiana Ramblers », EDDIE AND CHUCK came in 1954 with a bouncing thing, « Boogie The Blues » on the Chicago Chance label (# 3012). Weird and savage steel, great vocal and solid bass. How they were acquainted with an otherwise Blues/jazz label (1100 serie with already known artists like Wllie Nix – ex- Sun Records, or J.B. Hutto) is open to conjecture.

These sides were not unknown to Stan Lewis, owner of KWKH in Shreveport, La., who also acted as talent scout for Northern companies : Dale Hawkins and Sonny Boy Williamson came from his stable of artists and were recruited by Chess/Checker.Chance had apparently a 3000-C&W serie, but I never ever heard of any more record than this in this serie.

Dottie Jones & Winston O’Neal

A real male/female duet now with DOTTIE JONES & WINSTON O’NEAL. A fast bopper , « I’ll Be Yours » has a prominent guitar – the solo comes a la Carl Perkins ! To be found on TNT 134 (San Antonio, Texas).

From unknown source, I picked up on YouTube a nice slice of fast Hillbilly bop wih « Me And My Fiddle » by BENNY MARTIN, apparently in 1954-55. Martin cut records on Pioneer, Mercury and M-G-M. One one side he was backed with  »Hilllous Butrum & his Tennessee Partners », ex-bass player for Hank Williams, and was of rural Tennessee extraction. Nevertheless a very fine Hillbilly bopper.

Cliff Waldon & his Westernaires

Not owning Boppin’ Hillbilly vol. 15, I can’t say nothing about CLIFF WALDON & His Westernaires. His « My Baby Doll », issued on Mark 107, has an agile fiddle (+ solo), a great steel, even a bass solo. Vocal is OK for this fast Bopper.

Cash Box Aug. 31, 1957

CashBox June 25, 1955

Is there any need of presenting the MADDOX BROS. & ROSE ? I chose two tracks from their mostly creative period (Columbia, 1952 onwards). « No More Time » is a fast opus, which is still near to their Four Star product. « I’ve Got Four Big Brothers (To Look After Me ) » has Rose on lead vocal, with funny lyrics, in a true Rockabilly : Columbia 21405 from June 1955.

Sources : YouTube for Benny Martin ; W. Agenant’s Columbia 20000 serie » for the Maddox tracks ; Eddie & Chuck from various good compilations ; Bobby Wayne from 45cat. Starlite Wranglers image from “706 Union Avenue” site. My own archives.S

Late August 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Very different things this time, from 1947 to 1961.

Ray Whitley & his Six Bar Cowboys

First, from June ’47, RAY WHITLEY & His Bar X Cowboss for « Wiihin This Broken Heart  » on Cowboy 307. Fiddle, accordion, guitar – a lovely swinging uptempo, and typical of the ’40s. Location unknown, very probablbly East coast. Whitley also released the first (?) version of « Juke Box Cannonball » (Cowboy 301), also done by Bill Haley in 1952, (Holiday) « Cousin » Ford Lewis in 1947 (Four Star) and Charlie Stone (Arcade) in 1954. Whitley was an actor in Westerns too, as well as recording (1934 onwards) on Decca, Perfect, Conqueror. What a rich career !

Change completely for Louisiana. ALDUS ROGER saw this record « Lifetime Waltz » issued by San Antonio, Texas T.N.T. label (# 106, 1956). Vivid Cajun vocal and marvelous accordian : earlier he was recorded by Jay D. Miller on his Feature label with the nice « Mardi Gras Dance » (Feature 2004):an aggressive steel and a good accordion, of course, from 1954.

Jerry Dove & his String Busters

Let’s stay in San Antonio on T.N.T. # 141 with a carbon copy (lyrics) of « Blue Suede Shoes » in « Pink Bow Tie ». JERRY DOVE was the leader (which instrument?) and Bill Massey the singer. Cool vocal, a really great and raucous, wild steel, an heavy bass. The flipside (« Foolish Heart » is similar, although less fast, a moderate swinging ballad, well done anyway. Value (B.J.’s) : $ 200-250.

Next cut on the Marlinda label (no clues on the label) # 1626. JIM RUSE delivers his « What Are You Tryin’ To Do » , mid-paced tempo, a good rhythm guitar (uninventive for the solo), a gay vocal very melodic. For Goodness’ sake, I don’t where I picked this one from..

Jack Fincher & Collin County Four

Another small Texas label was Skippy. I chose both sides of # 224 (1961) by JACK FINCHER & Collins Couny Four. « When I’m Stepping Out » is a good melodic hillbilly bop ballad. Nice steel, hillbilly vocal. The flipside, « Nickels Worth Of Pennies » do follow the same pattern : great steel and heavy ehythm guitar.

In a recent Fortnight, I’d publish EDDIE HAZELWOOD version of « Hound Dog » . Here is another goodie, « I’ve Gotta Lose My Blues » (Intro 6068), 1953. Written by Danny Dedmond, actually Danny Dedmon – see his story elsewhere in the site.

That’s it, folks.

Sources : 45 cat for labels, 78worlds (Ray Whitley). Internet for more thn one tune. My own archives. Ronald Keppner for some records (Ray Whitley). Viele Danke, Ronald!

Early June 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello everyone ! In those times of confinement, it’s good to hear fresh bopping music. Because my hard-disk is out of service and that the repair shop is still closed, I chose ancient items, previously released in old Fortnight’s favorites selections. So they won’t ring too familiar.

T. Texas Tyler

The first selection is done by T. TEXAS TYLER : a fast « Sratch and Itch » done in 1953 on 4Star, leased to Decca. 28760. Obviously there is not much growls from Tyler in this one. The backing is suoperb.

The veteran TEX RITTER (1906-1974) did also some Hillbilly bop songs. Here he releaes « Boogie Woogie Cowboy » on Capitol 928 (from early 1950). The backing provided is excellent too : the Capitol nucleus band, Eddie Kirk and Merle Travis on guitars, Speedy West on steel, Cliffie Stone on bass, Billy Liebert on piano and Harold Hensley on fiddle.

Tex Ritter

Chuck Wells

CHUCK WELLS (1922-1997) was a native of Birmingham, Alabama. He found his musical success in Texas, working at several night spots throughout the Fort Worth area. He was also appearing over radio stations KCNC and KCUL in Fort Worth, too. Here he sings (1953) the great shuffler « The Marryin’ Preacher Man » on Columbia 23212.

Tony Farr

From Texas comes TONY FARR. He had two discs on Enterprise, among them the second is the better. : « There’s No Sense In Marrying Me ».
This artist, billed “And His Swinging Guitar”, based in Beaumont, Texas. “What’s The Use” has a nice guitar, but the fiddle is prominent (# 1208) on this 1958 issue, while “There’s No else In Marrying Me” (# 1211) is a jumping tune with a similar instrumentation.

Then in Louisiana’s West Monroe. Jiffy was a short-lived affair, however important by the quality of its issues, and the celebrity of some names, Jimmy Pickard, Tommy Spurlin or Jimmy Simpson. Here is the least known ED RAYBORN & his Southern Hillbillies, and the good medium paced « I’ll go on hurting » (# 208). Nice fiddle/steel and sincere vocal.

Ed Rayborn

Jerry Dove

A couple of years later or so, a man led a typical Hillbilly combo : JERRY DOVE (instrument unknown). He had already put a minor rockabilly classic in 1956, « Pink bow tie » on T.N.T. Label (# 144), but he was more a producer and musician than a singer. Here he gathers the duet (male/female) of Ray Stone and Dove’s wife, Peggy. The side is bluesy, and very atmospheric : « Losin’ the blues » (# 173)

Guy Gardner

On Dixie 1068 (1961) by GUY GARDNER & his Country Four, here’s «High Society», an uptempo ballad : jumping vocal and instrumentation (piano and steel). Madison, TN label (sublabel to Starday).

Doug Davis

With « All by myself » by DOUG DAVIS on the Texan Nite star label (# 007, from ca. 1963), we touch the real thing ! Already posted in 2010, this time with a nice label scan. It has haunting steel, perfect ballad vocal and confident backing (steel, rhythm only). My prefered all-time ballad. Davis had another record on Malinda 113 (untraced)

Sources: mainly from past Fortnight’s issues. See through “Artists” for details given before.

As an add and to continue with my homage to the late

LITTLE RICHARD

, here are some more tracks from his long career.

First, a short instrumental, “Cavalcade” cut at the very last session for Specialty (October 1957) which gave éShe Knows How To Rock”, “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On” and “Hound Dog”.

From his Gospel days, I chose the loud, brassy, rollicking “He Got What He Wanted”, cut in 1962 for Mercury records.

From July 1964 and his real comeback album on Vee-Jay, here’s a real blues – so rare in his entire career. « Going Home Tomorrow» is sung with a lot of spirit. Richard is backed by an old friend on electric fiddle, Don « Sugarcane » Harris – who was also there for « Bama Lama Bama Lou » in April of the same year (last Specialty cut). The guitar player may also be Dewey Terry.

From 1965, a small hit (climbing in the lower parts of the R&B charts), “I Don’t Know What You’ve Got, But It’s Got Me”, released by Vee-Jay. The organ is played by a young Billy Preston) and the guitar player is a certain Maurice James, who was about to change his name at his arrival on the British shoreJimi Hendrix, after having been fired by Richard.I

In 1969, during a T.V. show, here’s a frenetic live version of “True Fine Mama”.

From 1971, as a backing piano player for Delaney Bramlett (of Delaney & Bonnie duet), Richard pounds the piano on “Miss Ann”, released by Atco Records.

Finally, from unknown sources, a berserk wildie version of “Good Golly Mss Molly”, maybe cut for a film, while Richard is duetting in 1992 with Tanya Tucker for a great interpretation of the classic Eddie Cochran’s song “Something Else”.