early June 2013 fortnight favorites

Howdy folks! Ready for a new musical trip? This time, very various things. First, the famous SHAGMAR BULLNASTY in 1963 on the Trash label doing “Tapping That Thing“. It’s a risqué lyrics song they say, I don’t know why. The same song with a slightly different tempo came out as BOLIVER SHAGNASTY on Quartercash (Tennessee label). It is rumoured that these names disguise rockabilly Mack Banks, and that the original version came from J. C. Cale (Youtube carries the story to the tune). Anyhow I offer the original version cut during the 40s by YANK RACHELL on the Bluebird label.

trash shagnasrty tapping

yank rachell

 

bluebird rachell tapping

Tapping That Thing

Shagmar Bullnasty

 

Well listen little kids I’m going to sing a little song

It goes like this and it won’t take long

 

I’m tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

I’m tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Well Ma and Pa was laying in the bed

Ma turned to Pa and then she said

 

Start tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

It’s a little old thing all covered with fuzz

The best damn pussy there ever was

 

Start tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Lets tap!

(solo)

 

Well I touched her up high and I touched here down low

I touched her in the middle and she didn’t let go.

 

Say tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Well I got it in the kitchen and I got it in the hall

I got it on my finger and I swing it on the wall

 

Say tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Well I took here in and I laid here on the floor

The wind from her ass blew the cat out the door

 

Said tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Let’s tap a little now

(another solo)

 

Mama’s in the kitchen and Papa’s in the jail

Sister’s on the corner hollerin’ pussy for sale

 

Sayin’ tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Well I cut it once and I cut it twice

The last time I cut it cut it deep and nice.

 

Sayin’ tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Now six times six makes thirty six

I’m only going to hit it about six more licks

 

Yeah tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Yeah everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

(thanks to Mark Freese, who transcribed the lyrics)

 

 

From Alabama too came OTHELL SULLIVAN. He cut hillbilly on the Southern label in 1952, then in 1960 this fine uptempo “There’s Sure To Be Goodbyes” on the Reed label.

Another Hillbilly turning up to Rockabilly: BILL BLEVINS. During February 1953, he cut at the Holford Studio in Houston a session for Trumpet’s owner, Lilian McMurray. She issued “A Day Late And A Dollar Short”, typical Hillbilly bop of Mississipi, backed by Jimmy Swan’s band. This is the forerunner to Billy Barton’s song. Blevins resurfaced in 1957 on the very small National label for two rockabillies “Crazy Blues” and “Baby I Won’t Keep Waitin‘”, both threatening medium tempos.

Finally NORMAN SULLIVAN. He’s best known for a 1960 version of “Folsom Prison Blues” on the Roto label. Here is the flip side “She Called Me Baby”.

 

roto sullivan called

national blevins crazy

trumpet blevins late

reed sullivan goodbyes

late April 2011 fortnight’s favorites

Hi there. First the state of Utah is not well known among Hillbilly lovers. Sole artist I know from this state is RILEY WALKER. I already posted in a past “fortnight’s favorites” his great “Uranium Miner’s Boogie” (Atomic label – 1951? 1955? Impossible to date this, as it is so crude and primitive). Here I’ve chosen a second offering from Walker, less impressive, although almost equally good, on Atomic (# 703) , the amusing “It’s A Little Late“. Solid backing from his band, the Rocking-R-Rangers.

atomic walker lateroto sullivan

Let’s get back to the mid-sixties and NORMAN SULLIVAN (With The Country Rhythm Boys) on th ROTO label (unknown location), and a fine rendition of the Johnny Cash’s classic “Folsom Prison”, given a Country-rock treatment. Could mid-sixties.

Sarg Isbell Let's P.R.C. Carnes daddycountry  Country- cousins  heart's

Then, from a definitely not as known as he deserves – I’ve named SARG records, out of Luling, Texas. This label issued many a fine Hillbilly/Rockabilly/Rock’n’Roll. You name? DAVE ISBELL, Neal Merritt, Herby Shozel, Eddy Dugosh, The Moods, Chester McIntyre, just a few of artitts on the Sarg label between 1954 and 1964. I’ve chosen the great DAVE ISBELL‘s “Let’s Do It Up Brown” (45-109), which has nothing to do with the Memphis’ Bud Deckleman song of the same name. More on SARG records on the pipeline!

Completely unknown to me, this PAUL CARNES, who apparently cut the record at his own expense on the  P.R.C. (penned by Paul R. Carnes) label. I cannot suspect any location, neither date: 1957-1958, I’d assume, for the fabulous “I’m A Mean Mean Daddy“. Very crude vocal, sparse backing. That’s HOW a true rural Hillbilly should be sung and played!

A little more light shed on the COUNTRY COUSINS (Denny Buck and Harold Weaver), who cut the B-side (A- unknown to me) for the very rare Country Records out of Oklahoma City, apparently only on 78rpm. Hence his rarity. This could be from 1955.

Finally, back to Rocking Blues for a change. The nickname “Sonny Boy” was adopted by two big figures in Blues, the first (prewar harmonica artist) was from Chicago, and died in 1948; the second (rn Rice Miller, hailed from Mississipi)  came North in 1954 to cut for Chess as “Sonny Boy  Williamson“. A third, far less known, without douby capitalizing on the popularity of the others, called himself only “Sonny Boy Williams“. He came from Florida, and cut in Nashville for the Duplex label, late ’50s, this little opus, “Alice Mae Blues“. It rocks!

duplex williams alice

As always, envoy the selections, as I did preparing this feature. Don’t forget to go to “Contact Me” section: some records/books I am selling could be of interest to you. Till then, bye-bye!