Early September 2021 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Fortnight early september 2021t

BOB PERRY on the Chicago label Bandera ( 1305) does provide us with a great, fast Country-rocker in 1960-61, « Weary Blues, Goodbye ». Fabulous rhythm guitar, assured vocal, and a out-of-this world steel-guitar solo. No drums audible, the rhythm guitar does give the pace. Perry was also on the Denver, Co label Bandbox (# 255) with the average « It’s All Over Now « . The « Goodbye » item change hands for $150-200, according to Tom Lincoln’s book. Barry K. John doesn’t even mention it.

Some call him « the « King of rockabilly «  (or the inventor,to say the least). CHARLIE FEATHERS had a rich career from 1955 until his death (1998). He began on Sun Records, before going for his greatest exposure on Meteor in 1956 and the classic double-sider « Get With It/ Tongue tied Jill » # 5032. He then switched to King, without any success (the place was full of young rockers), after that he came to small concerns : Kay, Memphis, Holiday Inn (a Sam Phillips’ label), Philwood, Pompadour and Vetco ; not to mention , after his rediscovery ;many albums iincluding on his own label, Feathers. Here he is with is second disc for Sun (the first was on the temporary Flip label). « Defrost Your Heart » has all the ingredients of Rockabilly : slapping bass (Bill Black), the Quinton Claunch (guitar) and Bill Cnntrell (fiddle) team, howms and growls by the singer. Sam Phillips never did allow Feathers to sing Rockabilly but ballads (November 1955).
The second side exceeds the limits of the site (1945-1965), a tour-de-force for Charlie, his lead player and the slapping bass of Marcus Van Story : « Where She’s At Tonight » (also publshed as « Rain ») (1969) is a dream come true for any Rockabilly lover.

.From a King to another ; this one of Honky Tonk, the greatest of ’em all : HANK WILLIAMS (1923-1953). He left behind him a lot of demos like this « Blue Love ». Great rhythm guitar and this unmistably voice. Next song is a another demo, which was later overdubbed by his band, the Drifting Cowboys. « Weary Blues From Waitn’ » is pure Honky Tonk heaven. It even has some yodel by Williams .

SLIM RHODES (born 1913) originally from Arkansas, cut records for Sam Phillips in 1950 which were issued by Gilt-Edge, a California concern. His “Hot Foot Rag » (# 5015) had a powerful lead guitar. In 1956 they cut 4 sides at Sun records aimed at Rockabilly circles, « Gonna Romp And Stomp » ( # 238) and “Do What I Do »/ »Take And Give » (256)

Next artist was out of Nahville. CLAY EAGER recorded for Republic. « Don’t Come Cryin’ On My Shoulder » ( # 7077) was a fair medium-paced bopper. . Later on, he went on his own label and Karl.

BOBBY ROBERTS was a two-faced artist. In 1955, he cut a fabulous Hank Williams styled Honky tonker, « I’m Gonna Comb You Outta Of My Hair » (November 1955) with his Ozark Drifters ( King 4837 (what a title!), The follow-up was « I’m Pullin’ Stakes And Leavin’ You » (# 4868), then was gone for Rockabilly in 1958 on Hut Records, a very small diskery,and in 1956 for Sky (MS) « Big Sandy »/She’s My Woman ». The son to Roberts did confirm me his Dad was on King then Sky and Hut.

CHUCK HARDING must have been a good seller, because Modern issued a good half-dozen records by him. « Talkin’ The Blues » is a fine bopper from 1947.

Sources: my own archives (Hank Williams, Bobby Roberts), Internet for Happy Wainwright. Many items do come from my own sound library.

From Florida or Georgia, HAPPY WAINWRIGHT went in 1961 with a good bopper (nice steel) on Carma 505, « Nothing But Love ».

Late November 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

The first of 7 artists is the Virginian KED KILLEN on the mythic (in Bluegrass circles) Rich-R’-Tone label (# 1064, from 1953). With the tight accompaniment of the Bright Brothers, he delivers « Crying Blues » : bluesy hillbillly bop, with wailing vocal and a very great guitar ; hooking rhythm. The flip is a fast bopper, with the same type of vocal : « No End To My Loving You ». Killen can also be found on Kyva (Kentucky-Virginia) # 707 (« You Better Take Time », elsewhere in this site), a Starday custom from 1957, as in the ’60s on Western Ranch.

From Memphis, 1957, a classic « I’ve Got Love If You Want It » by WARREN SMITH (Sun 286), crisp lead guitar (Al Hopson or Roland Janes). Typical Sun rockabilly rocker. The original had been done by Slim Harpo on Excello (swamp blues).

SMILEY WILSON next (Hamilton, K. Wilson – 1922-1988) for two tunes very, very different. On the Nashville Republic label # 7033 (cut in October 1953, according to Billboard), he launched « Barnyard Blues », an heavy bluesy, R&B influenced song ; nice vocal and insistent guitar. On now to April 1947 on the Apollo label (# 141) for the funny « Red Silk Stockings And Green Perfume », a fast typical late 40s Hillbilly which combines accordion, steel and fiddle + a short guitar solo. Wilson was a native of Gadsden, Alabama, as the well-known (at last to me, nd you faithful readers!) Lee Bonds.

« Hog Tied And Branded » (Columbia 21391, recorded or released April 1955) by BONNIE SLOAN (b. 1937). Here she is backed by the Town Hall Party Gang of Los Angeles, for example Joe Maphis on guitar and Fiddlin’ Kate (you know what she’s playing). Energetic vocal, and a welcome banjo. Typical mid-50s Country music, however she never got it big.

The next artist, CLIFF GROSS, had worked as early as 1931 with the Hi-Flyers : he was a mountain style fiddler. He recorded in duet on Conqueror. Here we find him on the Kentucky Dixiana label (# 105) « and his Texas Cowboys », (probably recorded in Dallas) for the great fast talking blues « Hog Pen Hop » in 1954 : a hot bopper with accordion and steel (short fiddle and guitar solos too).

From Mobile, Alabama, in 1959- or shortly later, here’s JOHNNY FOSTER for a great Rock-a-balllad, « Locked Away From Your Heart » on Sandy 1028. Great haunting vocal, fine steel, good piano and fiddle. Later Foster went on Capa.

Then a Rockabilly/rocker « I’ll Keep On Lovin’ You » by the VARIATONES. An average rocker, late ’50s or early ’60s, without something really cracking. Production by Billy Harlan. Is this the « I Wanna Bop » artist (Brunswick 55066)?

sources : my own archives ; Martin Hawkins notes for Warren Smith, Smiley Wilson – picture from « A shot in the dark) ; Bonnie Sloan from Columbia 20000 serie (thanks W. Agenant) ; a Tom Sims cassette for Johnny Foster .

RED KIRK, “Lovesick blues” boy, “The voice of the Country”

Born 24 May 1925, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Claude “Red” Kirk started playing steel guitar at seven but changed to ordinary guitar and began singing at 10. He served in the US Army during World War II and on discharge played on WNOX Knoxville’s Mid Day Merry-Go-Round and Tennessee Barn Dance. He spent three years as a member of Archie Campbell’s touring show but later his fine vocals, reminiscent of Eddy Arnold, saw him tour and work radio and television at numerous venues including Dayton, Lexington and Louisville. He also played on WLS National Barn Dance in Chicago, the Big “D” Jamboree in Dallas and the Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport and made guest appearances on the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. He made his first recordings for Mercury in 1949, on some being accompanied by noted session musicians that included Jerry Byrd (steel guitar) and Tommy Jackson (fiddle). He later recorded for ABC-Paramount Records, Starday, Dewitt and Great. Died in Bristol, TN, in May 1999. (anonymous biography from allmusic.com) His radio shows as D.J. : WNOX, Knoxville, TN ; WTMT, Louisville, KY ; WKLO, Louisville, KY ; WOWI, New Alban, IN ; WIMA, Lima, OH. (from hillbilly-music.com) RED KIRK : an appreciation (by bopping’s editor)

  1. the Mercury and RCA years (1949-1954)

Fine honky tonk music that brought Kirk the somewhow ambitious nickname of « The voice of the country », it spanned five years and gave him two massive hits. Generally backed by the cream of Cincinnati musicians, among them Jerry Byrd on steel for example, he kept the Mercury label’s executives faith in him to go on in spite of moderate sales of his other records. Most of his recordings for Mercury are uptempos, although his voice pushed him naturally to sing ballads, hence his nickname : he was then a bit crooning and, apart from one or two exceptions, I’ll let them apart. So I will concentrate on uptempo and boppers. It’s very hard to describe Red Kirk’s version of « Lovesick blues » (Mercury 6189), since it’s so very close to Hank Williams’ one. What is notable is the urgency of the recording, very early (presumably February 1949) after the « original » (which actually was not) of Williams, cut late December 1948. Kirk’s version is credited « Traditional » and includes an accordion part. The other tunes of the session are forgettable ballads (# 6189 and 6204).Kirk Red "Lovesick blues" “Lovesick blues

download « I wasted a nickel » (# 6223) and « Church bells chimed » (# 6274) are good examples of the ballads of Red Kirk : the richness and sweetness of his voice are perfectly emphasized by musicians, as told before, the top notch team of Cincinnati country music : among them, one can speculate Zeke Turner on lead guitar, Tommy Jackson on fiddle. Red Kirk is even (a common practice then) associated vocally to a girl singer, Judy Perkins, for two ballads (# 6237).I wasted a nickel

download “Church bells chimed”

download

Judy Perkins

Billoard August 5, 1950

Time goes on, and we reach the second Red Kirk hit, in November 1950 : « Lose your blues » is a bluesy bopper with some yodeling, backed by Jerry Byrd. Lose your blues

download “Never been so lonesome

download Kirk Red "Cold steel blues"Kirk Red "Never been so lonesome" Out of the HW pattern was the slow, bluesy « Can’t understand a woman (who can’t understand her man) » # 6288), and the fast, double-voiced « Sugar-coated love «  # 6332)[a very fine guitar solo.]     “Can’t understand a woman (who can’t understand her man)”

downloadSugar coated love

Billboard June 9, 1951

download Kirk Red "Can't understand a woman (who can't understand her man)"kirk red "Sugar- coated love     Kirk went further in 1952 with the proto-rockabillies « Knock out the lights and call the law » (# 6409) and « Walkin’ ’round in circles » (# 70044) : both include snare drums and predate by two years the Starday sound, which included howling steel and sawing fiddle. Note that the nickname “The voice of the country” was erased, only remain the laconic “vocal by Red Kirk“. But for Mercury, enough was enough. Success had for too long eluded Kirk and they let him go. « Train track shuffle » (# 6358) escaped to my researches, and although the title sounds promising for a train song, nobody seems to own it. Kirk Red "Knock out the lights and call the law"Kirk Red "Walkin' 'round in circles"Knock out the lights and call the law

download “Walkin’ ’round in circles

download Red Kirk appeared in 1954 as vocalist on a notorious Chet Atkins session held in Nashville, and sang a good mid-paced bopper, « Set a spell » (RCA 47-5956), but this seems to be more a good turn to Kirk than a step to a new recording label.”Set a spell

download Atkins Chet (Red Kirk vocal) "Set a spell"

  1. The final Red Kirk years (1956-1967)

From then on, Kirk went from one small label to another, searching the always elusive hit. In late 1955 he cut two tracks in Nashville for Republic # 7120 : « Davy Crockett blues » is a fine uptempo, with some yodel, based of course on the current rage. Stylistically it’s not that far from his last Mercury sides three years earlier : steel and fiddle gave him a good support. A very convincing side, although in 1956 it was way too late for such a type of song. « Red lipped girl » is a folkish fast, dramatic song which has a strong Indian appeal, as Marvin Rainwater.

Billboard Jan. 21, 1956

Kirk Red "Davy Crockett blues"Kirk Red "Red lipped girl"Davy Crockett blues”

download “Red lipped girl”

download In 1957, Kirk choose a Lee Hazlewood/Loy Clingman song « It’s nothing to me » and cut it on the Ring label # 1503 : his rich deep voice does a very good effect on that song, although he copies the original very close. Note that the credit goes to « Patterson », a pseudonym of Leon Payne. Kirk’s ’45 had at any rate made some noise, because the larger ABC bought the sides and reissued them as ABC-Paramount 9814. The flipside « How still the night » is a good ballad, with prominent piano.Kirk Red "It's nothing to me"Clingman Loy "It's nothing to me"Kirk Red "How still the night" “It’s nothing to me”

download “How still the night”

download Later on in 1958, Kirk recorded a single on Starday regular serie (# 421) : « Dark streets/I wonder », to me are very ordinary Country songs, well in the Nashville mould. Then he had two ’45s on the DeWitt and Spot labels (one track « Hurtin’ all over » is common to both of issues), but I didn’t hear them.Dark streetsKirk Red "Dark streets"

download Finally on Great (a sublabel to Chart) in 1967 (# 1075), he recut « It’s nothing to me », and he does a very fine job with this modern version (it even has a brass section and violins). The flipside is « Sleep, little brother », a sincere ballad.It’s nothing to me

downloadKirk Red "It's nothing to me" And that’s it. Red Kirk disappears from the musical scene, and no one knows what he did (perhaps radio?) between 1967 and his death in 1999 in Bristol, Tennessee.   Sources: 45-cat and 78rpm-world; YouTube for some tracks; the invaluable help once more of the indefatigable Ronald Keppner; my own archives.

Bill Carter, “By the sweat of my brow”, California hillbilly bop/rockabilly

Nothing to do with Jimmy Carter’s supposed brother ! That Bill Carter was a member of the Big Jim DeNoone’s Rhythm Busters.Bill Carter autographe

His story begins on December 12, 1929, when he was born in Eagleton, Arkansas, one of ten siblings, the son of an itinerant share cropper. By the time he was nine years old, he was singing on KGHI out of Little Rock, Arkansas. In 1937 , the family moved to Broken Bow, Oklahoma. Bill’s father got a job with the Southern Pacific Railroad in Indio, California, in 1943, and the family headed west. Bill’s interest in music was encouraged, and he took voice lessons during his teens, as well as performing on radio stations KRBO (Indio) and KROX (Modesto), modelling himself on Eddy Arnold. After graduating from Coachella Valley High school, Bill gained employment with the Johnson lumber Company in Grass Valley, and confined his performings to weekends.

In 1949 he joined USAF, and whilst stationed at Lackland and subsequently Parks AFB in Calfornia, Bill formed several bands, playing with the likes of Shorty Lavender (lead guitar and fiddle), Slim Roberts (fiddle), and Bob Cooper (drums). His music was firmly strenched in C&W and performing at NCO clubs kept his hand in. Whilst still in the Air Force, he got to perform with Cal Smith’s band in San Leandro, as well as playing dates in the San Francisco area, and venturing as far afield as San Antonio, Texas radio stations to perform. (more…)

early December 2012 fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks. My selection for this fortnight will be made, as usual, of lesser known artists up, and various times, ranging from approx. 1953 to early ’60s.

SHORTY LONG in 1961 was certainly no newcomer to music, as he had been cutting records on King in 1951, sharing a session with BOB NEWMAN. The latter in 1955 was reported as having joined Long’s Santa Fe Ranchers. Here  Long offers the fast “Forget Her“, an hybrid song containing a slap-bass as well as banjo, mandolin and steel on the Smiling 2675 label. Long is billed here “Kentucky”, no doubt his original state. Both Shorty Long and Bob Newman paired in 1955 as Dalton Boys for a solitary “Roll, Rattler, Roll” on the X label: next fortnight.(April 2, 2018. Note the Shorty Long  here has probably nothing to do with the Pennsylvania born Shorty Long – records on King, Valley and RA-Victor; see his story elsewhere in this site)

On a Evansville, IN Eunice 1007 label, DARRELL LEE offers an average Country-rocker/Rockabilly “Really Do You Care?“.affiche shorty long

smiing long forget

shorty long

Shorty Long

eunice lee really1958, TIM JOHNSON on the West Monroe label Leo (# 784) – which is actually a Starday custom issue – do come with the fine shuffler. A bit George Jones vocally, good fiddle and steel.

On Kasko 1643 (Santa Claus, IN) from 1965 RED LEWIS has a country-rocker “Yes, Indeed“(nice guitar, discreet steel) “I’ll Move along“.

The earliest track do come from Nashville in 1953. JOHNNY ROWLAND is a kind of mystery, although his voice seem very  professionnal. He founds himself on Republic 7023 with the fine “Ohio Baby“.

Finally SONNY MILLER on the Boyd label, no doubt early ’60s. Good steel in “Lonesome Old Clockboyd miller clock

sonny miller

Sonny Miller

leo johnson yeskasko lewisrepublic rowland ohio