Late December 2018 bopping fortnight’s favorites (1947 to 1966)

Howdy folks ! This is the last selection for the last December 2018 fortnight of bopping favorites. There is no actual link between the tracks, maybe a tenuous (banjo present) between two songs. Rest is otherwise very varied, from 1947 to 1966.

First artist is a duet of two siblings: the WOODWARD BROTHERS, from the Boston, MA area. They cut in 1954 the uptempo Hillbilly « Cuttin’ Paper Heart » on Sheraton 1001.

Their leader was Mick Woodward, whose « Hot Rod Race Navy Style » is very good styled Hot Rod song.

They were part of the W.C.O.P. Hayloft Jamboree, which also starred Jack Clement, future Sun’s A&R man and artist in his own right.

From Cincinnati, OH, a female Rockabilly, LAUNA GUNTER with Queen City Ramblers: they do « He’s My Man » (Excellent 807, from 1958) : a sugary voice over a solid backing (guitar and romping/hopping piano).

LYNN CRAMER & Blue Sky Ramblers, from Florida, do come next with a dramatic, atmosheric Rockabilly, »Wild She Devil » : fiddle to the fore, Blue Sky 109, located in St.Clair, Florida.

« Banjo Boogie » (Modern 534) was an unusual instrumental tune in the repertoire of the LONE STAR PLAYBOYS, cut in 1947 by this legendary combo.

Based in Waco, Texas, Lone Star Playboys were a popular country touring band in Central Texas from 1937 to the 1950s. Members of the group included vocalist Hamlet Booker and his brother Morris Booker on mandolin,

Vince Incardona on banjo, fiddler Cotton Collins, bassist Pee Wee Truehitt. They were long associated to Bob Wills.

From Louisiana, young DOUG STANFORD released, after his famous two-sider « Sadie/Won’t you tell me » on D (1957, issued in Fortnight August 2016, or February 2014), a very nice another double-sider on Carma Records (# 514) « Can You Explain/The Way You Used To Be » :

jumping Country-rocker and a Rockaballad issued circa 1960. Two pleasant songs. Another 45 by Stanford has until now escaped my researches : on the Bofuz 1108 label, «Same Old Crazy Me ».

Second artist to border Bluegrass is the veteran banjo player BILL CLIFTON, backed by his Mountain Boys, for « Lonely Heart Blues » (Mercury 71200, September 1957).

WHITEY KNIGHT (1920-1977), already posted in a past Fortnight’s favorites (November 2017). Here he claims to the fine, heartbroken song

« Another Brew, Bartender » released on Sage & Sand 205 in California. Good fiddle.

Here is JIM BOYD & His Men Of The West, for a romping « Boogie Woogie Square Dance ».( RCA 20-4263, released September 1951). Boyd had previously cut the very first version of « Dear John ». See the story behind this song in the article devoted to Aubrey Gass. Note this « Boogie Woogie » was penned by the prolific Billy Hughes, an artist in his own right.

On the Evana label (# 0001) in 1966 one can finally hear WAYNE SATCAMP & the Five Aces and the minimalist backing (fiddle to the fore) «Barber Hair Blues». A good bopper for this era.

Sources : more than one YouTube posts ; 45-world for Jim Boyd and Lone Star Playboys label scans; Gripsweat for Doug Stanford on Carma, among others ; Rocky-52 for the Lone Star Playboys info ; Aradillo Killer for Bill Clifton music and label scan ; 45 Ohio River for Launa Gunter

Cliff Carlisle, Blues yodeler and steel guitar wizard – some selections

Cliff Carlisle (1904-83)

A blues with a yodel : it may not sound much now, but in the 1920s a lot of careers were carved out of that curious amalgam. Jimmie Rodgers started it, and after him went Gene Autry, or Jimmie Davis, or Cliff Carlisle. The latter yodeled the longest and the best.

Raised in the countryside outside Louisville, Kentucky, Carlisle would say later : « My music is a cross between hillbilly and blues – even Hawaïan music has a sort of blues to it. » Teaming first in the early Thirties with the singer-guitarist Wilbur Ball, he went on the vaudeville tent show circuit, and afterwards he told they had actually been the first yodeling duet.

Then in 1930 he recorded in a Jimmie Rodgers vein (« Memphis yodel »), but with a distinctive touch on the Dobo resonator steel guitar. At this point he was also making a name on Louisville stations (WHAS and WLAP), billing himself and Ball as the « Lullaby Larkers ». That’s how his career took off.

In 31 or 32, he was in New York, extending his own port-folio, and recalling Jimmie Rogers singing a number about a rooster : « What makes a Shanghai crow at the break of day ? To let the Dominicker hen know the head man’s on his way.. » Ralph Peer wouldn’t let him record that, because it was kind of a risqué tune at that time, but finally he let Carlisle go. Hence « Shanghaï rooster yodel n°2 ».

Carlisle Cliff "Shanghai rooster blues"

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In 1932 Carlisle was working solo, but in the years that followed he was often partnered by his younger brother Bill. On one of their records they even staged a fight over who would do what. « Hold it, buddy, » says Cliff indignantly as Bill starts to yodel. « This is my « Mouse’s ear blues », and I’ll do the yodeling. » It isn’t the only unusual feature. « Moose’s ear blues » is, probably uniquely in the corpus of recorded hillbilly music, a song about defloration. « My little mama, she’s got a mouse’s ear, but she gonna lose it when I shift my gear. »

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By the mid-’30s, when he was working on WBT in Charlotte, North Carolina, and recording for Bluebird and Decca, Cliff was making a fair bid to corner the hillbilly disc market in sniggery songs about roosters and ashcans (there was an occasional double entendre loitering in this vicinity), and humorously violent tales of marital discord like « Hen pecked man », « Pay day fight » or « A wild cat woman and a tom cat man », where Cliff’s boisterous flights of fancy are powered by the twin engines of his Dobro and Bill’s inventive flat-picked guitar. By the end of the decade he had been on four record labels and made almost 200 sides. He and Bill had a cross-section of country music just prior to WWII. So it was hardly surprising that their family group, the Carlisles, with various sons and dauhters, was popular on the Grand Ole Opry and had hits in the ’50s with « Too old to cut the mustard » and « No help wanted ».

Carlisle Cliff "A wild cat woman and a tom cat man"

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In the mid-’50s Cliff retired to a quiet life of painting, fishing and church work. He did the occasional comeback on not very memorable albums for small labels, even reuniting with Wilbur Ball and playing for college audience or folk festivals.

(Freely adapted from the chapter devoted to Cliff Carlisle in Tony Russell’s « Country music originals – The legends and the lost »)

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Here are some selections of Carlisle’s work in very different styles.

From 1932, backed by a wild slapping-bass, for the evergreen « Goin’ down the road feelin’ bad ».

downloadCarlisle Cliff "Goin' down the road feelin' bad"

Accompanied by two guitars (Bill Carlisle) and a string-bass for « That nasty swing » from 1936.
Carlisle Cliff "That nasty swing"

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In January 1947, from one of his last recording sessions, with his Buckeye Boys and for a song very close to Bill Monroe‘s « Rocky road blues » (February 1945), «A mean mama don’t worry me ».

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Carlisle Cliff "A mean mama don't worry me"Recommended listening, if you can find them: Cliff Carlisle volume 1 & 2 on Old Timey 103 & 104.

“Whammy Bammy Buzzard Goozer” – from Hillbilly to Rock’n’roll: the LOUIE INNIS story (1946-1956)

LOUIE INNIS (biography by Greg Adams, Allmusic.com). [Additions by Bopping’s editor.]

Louie Innis was born on January 21, 1919 (d. Aug. 20, 1982) in Seymour, Indiana. His role as a session guitarist is often emphasized but the fact is that, for us, it was not his most important role.

Louie Innis (sometimes credited as Louis) is one of those 50-year-old hillbilly boppers that thrill country music collectors. He never had a success [that’s not true], but his recordings for King and Mercury were cheerful, boogies uptempos and proto-rockers that show the musical mastery and the vocal work of Innis.

He was part of Hank Penny’s The Plantation Boys in the early 1940s, performing guitar and bass chores alongside Carl Stewart and Zed Tennis as violinists, and Roy Lanham’s solo guitar. Here is an example of Louie Innis work as rhythm player during a Hank Penny March 1945 session in Cincinnati, OH.: “Talkin’ about you” (King 512)

king penny talkin'

hank penny picture

Hank Penny

Talkin’ about you

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They worked with The Delmore Brothers, Merle Travis, Bradley Kincaid and Grandpa Jones. They also accompanied WLW pop singer Doris Day. After the march of Lanham, in 1944 the band toured with the USO before Penny traveled to California at the behest of [Merle] Travis, and the group undid. Later, when Penny was under contract with RCA, Innis composed a pair of songs to him, “No Muss-No Fuss-No Bother“(RCA 58-0183)  and “Hold The Phone” (1951).rca penny fuss

No muss-no fuss-no bother

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«(You ain’t nothin’ but a female) Hound Dog“, a duet with Charlie Gore, is an issue that has surfaced in rockabilly compilations, although it was recorded in 1953, indicating that Innis was on the road to rock & roll, though he was never permanently installed on it.

charlie gore picture

Charlie Gore

king gore dog“(You ain’t nothin’ but a female) Hound dog

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There are very few biographical data we could gather about Innis; however, on King Records’ promotional discs some details about the performer were outlined: on King 1225 (1953) he was defined: “Composer, vocalist, instrumentalist and emcee [presenter at Indiana Hoedown on WFBM], Louis innis excels in every facet. An Indiana guy who started on the radio at age 16, Innis has already made up a few hit songs. »

 

In King 1406 (1954) it was stated: “Indiana native Louie Innis became interested in music for the first time thanks to the local hairdresser who knew a few chords on the guitar, and both played and did duets between cuts of hair and shaved, almost every day. »

 

On the other side of the same single was noted: “A familiar figure among the broadcasts of folk music is Louie Innis. One of the outstanding rhythmic guitars in the business, Louie Innis worked with Red Foley for two and a half years at the Grand Ole Opry and has recorded with over fifty different artists ».

 

King 4861 (1955) noted: “(….) His work as a guitarist is much appreciated and is required by many great country stars. Louie is currently working as an emcee at the Indiana Hoedown in Indianapolis, Indiana. »

 

And on the flipside it was said: “Born in Shelbyville, Indiana, 35 years ago, Louie Innis was driven into music business when he was expelled from high school. He and some other students “played hookey” (skipped classes) one day. “The other guys lied about why they had gone away, but I told the truth,” he explains. “Later, when the director found out, he begged me to come back, but I said ‘no thank you’, and I took music seriously with the blessing of my parents.”

 

As a composer, in addition to his own songs, highlights “Seven Nights To Rock“, along with Buck Trail and Henry Glover, for Moon Mullican (1956), a classic rockabilly that he never got to record:

 

Seven nights to rockking mullican seven

Seven nights to roll

Seven nights I’m gonna show my face

With a different woman in a different place

Seven nights to rock

I’ve got seven nights to roll

Seven nights to rock

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Monday, I’m gonna rock with Jane

Tuesday, it’s gonna be Luane

Wednesday, it’s Esteline

Thursday, it’s Betty Sue and me

Friday, it’s Linda Lue

Saturday and Sunday any chick’ll do

 

Monday, Sister Suzie’s ball

Tuesday, I’m at the union hall

Wednesday, I’m at the roadhouse inn

Thursday, I’m at the lion’s den

Friday, I’m at the Chatter Box

Saturday and Sunday everybody rocks

 

Skip, Hop & Jump Country Style” is a German 23-track anthology of recordings of Innis on Mercury and King between 1949 and 1955, full of Innis novelties and a few hillbilly covers of pop and R & B hits such as “Oh! Babe by Louis Prima and “Hearts of Stone” by the Charms. «Stomp that thing» is a recent (2017) digital anthology to be found on Uncle Gil’s Rockin’ Archives blogsite.

broncocd innis

hmc cd innis

unclegil.blogspot.fr (43 tracks)

Louis Prima: “Oh! babe

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RH prima babe

Innis used a superb rhythmic section filled with resources like palms, bells, whistles and howls, as a precedent of what Sid King & the Five Strings would do next. Innis had a prominent band in which Zeb and Zeke Turner, Jerry Byrd, Tommy Jackson and Don Helms paraded in different stages, along with Maddox Brothers & Rose, to the category of talents that “should have been», but never received sufficient recognition.

 

 

 

 

 

LOUIE INNIS : an appreciation track per track (by Bopping’s editor)

If the reading of comments is boring you, go direct to the podcasts, label scans and downloads.

Sterling and Deluxe issues (1947-late 1948)louie innis picture

« LOUIE & THE INNIS CLAN » (on Sterling)

«Look in the looking glass» is a fast Western swing novelty. Good guitar, steel (Jerry Byrd?) + a welcome trumpet solo. (N.Y.C. Sterling 207 – probably recorded in Nashville).

billboard26-4-47 innis

Billboard April 26 , 1947

Look in the looking glass

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«Tennessee Central» is of course a train song that’s « Rockin’ and reelin’». Fast. No fiddle. Trumpet main instrument. Steel effects of train. Agile lead guitar. (N.Y.C. Sterling 209 – probably recorded in Nashville).

Tennessee Central

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LOUIS INNIS

«I guess you just don’t care» is a mid-paced ballad. An accordion; fiddle, guitar and bass. Vocal is a bit Hillbilly crooning. (New Jersey Deluxe 5059, also probably recorded in Nashville). First song written by Louie Innis. Leased by King ? The session has nos less than 7 unissued songs left.

I guess you just don’t care

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sterling innis looksterling innis tennesseedeluxe !nnis guess

= On December 22, 1948, Innis did the rhythm guitar duty for the Hank Williams‘ session that released « Lost on the river » and « Lovesick blues ».

 

 

Mercury issues (July 1949-November 1951)

« LOUIE INNIS & THE STRING DUSTERS »

«Better back up mama» (# 6217) Billed on label «Country boogie and blues» : uptempo Bopper ; prominent fiddle, Jerry Byrd takes a steel solo. Probably Zeke Turner on lead guitar. Innis on energetic rhythm guitar.

“Better back up mama”

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«Chattanoogie boogie». Same style. Call-and-response format, billed on label «Country boogie».
“Chattanoogie boogie”

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mercury innis backmercury innis chattanoogie

= On August 30, 1949, Innis accompanied on rhythm guitar Hank Williams once more (and for the last time) on «I’m so lonesome I could cry», «I just don’t like this kind of livin’», «My bucket’s got a hole in it». Tommy Jackson was on fiddle, and probably accompanied Louis Innis on his first Mercury session, with Ernie Newton on bass, at E.T. Herzog Studio in Cincinnati, OH.

«She’s mean to me» (# 6225, reissued # 6273) is a real fine shuffler. Zeke Turner in good form. Byrd has his solo. Certainly Tommy Jackson on insistent fiddle.

One more «Country boogie» as noted on the label : «Jug band boogie» (# 6244). A novelty by the use of a washboard, handclaps, and the growls of Innis (imitating T. Texas Tyler). A fine bopper.

mercury innis meanmercury innis jug

“She’s mean to me”

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“Jug band boogie”

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«I thought she was a local (but she was a fast express)» (# 6273). Not written by Innis, it’s his second train-inspired opus. Very fast song, an harmonica (for the only time in Innis’ records), fiddle is prominent. Discreet steel, imitating a train bell. A promising «Woman hating blues» from this August 1950 session remains unissued.

Another pop novelty from the pen of Louis Prima, given the Hillbilly bop treatment, «Oh ! Babe» (# 6293). Tailor-made for Prima, a very nice version by the versatile Innis. An insistent guitar riff.

I thought she was a local

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Oh! Babe

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mercury innis localmercury innis babe

Then, without doubt, the greatest and the best selling pairing, Mercury 6312 : «Boogie woogie baby» has agressive drums and steel (solo). Zeke or Zeb Turner takes a good solo too. One of the masterpieces of Louie Innis, predating by 5 years the Rockabilly yet to come. Then his greatest claim to fame which also must have him secured a lot of money: «Goodnight Cincinnati, goodmorning Tennessee». Very fast train song. Jerry Byrd steel omnipresent.

cincinnati partitioncincinnati partition2Boogie woogie babyjerry byrd picture

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Goodnight Cincinnati, goodmorning Tennessee”

downloadmercury innis boogiemercury innis cincinnati

This song had many versions, the first to be waxed (March 1rst, 1951) and, in my opinion, the best, by Shorty Long on King 953;

Shorty Long version:

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by Marty Robbins on the stage of G.O.O. in June, Tex Williams too:billboard cincinnati

Marty Robbins version:

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even a pop version by Al Trace & Orchestra (vocal Bobby Hart). Ten years later it became a new hit in May 1961 in the hands of Rusty York. That’s an enduring Hillbilly rocker classic. 

Rusty York version (King 5511)

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billboard 31-3-51 trace

Billboard March 31, 1951

king york cincinnati

More to come with the next pairing. «Honky-tonk man» (# 6335) from May 1951. Strong country boogie guitar, loud drums, great steel. Same goes for the flipside, «Stomp that thing» (penned Innis-Turner) is a tour-de-force, his fastest song ever, without fiddle, and proto-rockabilly. Great song !

Honky tonk man

download “Stomp that thing

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mercury innis honkymercury innis stomp

In June 1951, Hank Penny cut the Louie Innis songs that were specially written for him : «No muss-no fuss-no bother» and «Hold the phone», although the session took place on the West coast (Innis not present).

So strangely «I’ve got a red hot love» (on the label, «Louie Innis » alone) (# 6370) from late 1951 returns to classic style Hillbilly bopper – the theme song is as usual. The fiddle is back, and the voice is always winkling. From the same session remained unissued «I’m the lonesomest guy».

“I’ve got a red hot love

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billboard 3-6-50 innis

 

 

 

LOUIE INNIS – The King years (1953-1955)

Remember. If my comments are boring you, go direct to podcasts, downloads and labels scans.

Louie Innis didn’t have in 1952 any recording pact, and without doubt he devoted himself to his work on WLW (Cincinnati, Midwestern Hayride) and WFBM (Indiana Hoedown), or recording sessions for others artists.

Billboard March 1953

February and March 1953. «Who’ll give me, you’ll give me, who’ll give me kisses» (# 1180) is a fast novelty and unpretentious very good bopper with its catch phrase.

Who’ll give me, you’ll give me, who’ll give me kisses

billboard 16-5-53 gore

Billboard May 16, 1953

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king innis kisses
Next thing is a true and well-known mark in Innis story. He duetted indeed with billboard 53 goreCharlie Gore for an hilarious version of the then R&B hit of Big Mama Thornton, which they changed to «(You ain’t nothin’ but a female) Hound dog» (# 1212). A nice shuffler, handclaps, a fine guitar solo. It’s true that such a tune  announces rockabilly.
 See above for the podcast.

From the same February 1953 session came « Whammy Bammy Buzzard Goozer », a non-sense out-and-out rocker. The fiddle solo is inventive, lot of drums and a saxophone backing (# 1225).

billboard 6-53 innis

Billboard June 1953

king innis whammyWhammy bammy buzzard goozer

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From September 1953 to September 1954. More train songs. First a novelty bopper «I ain’t got a pot (to peel potatoes in)» (# 1260) : an agressive steel, some discreet drums.

I ain’t got a pot

king innis locomotive

 

downloadking innis pot

Then the very fast «I got a round trip ticket» » from November 1953. Train effects by the steel payer ; pizzicato played fiddle, which seems mandolin . Plus, «There’s a red hot fire (in the old locomotive)» (# 1392) (penned Roberts = maybe Bob Newman under his usual pseudonym as writer), again a fast train song.

“I got a round trip ticket

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There’s a red hot fire

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Finally a cover of another R&B hit, “Hearts of stone” (# 1392), originally done by the Black vocal group The Charms. Innis does a fine mid-paced rendition of the song. Good steel and guitar. This crossover use of R&B and C&W songs was common at King for years, and gave many a new, fresh song.

The Charms, “Hearts of stone

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Louie InnisHearts of stone

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king innis heartsdeluxe charms hearts

Finally from October 1954 to May 1955. – Innis aided by Al Myers (lead guitar), Jerry Byrd and a bass player, formed The Country Cats for a 4-instrumentals session. Fine relaxed boppers : «Hot strings» (# 1410) and «Sun shadows» (# 1430).

king cats strings

king cats shadows

 

 

Al Myers

 

 

 

Hot strings

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Sun shadows

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Back to Louie Innis recording sessions. He did a good version of the old spiritual « Nobody knows you when you’re down and out », another crossover (# 1406). «The kissing chain» (which he didn’t write) is another mid-paced good novelty. Al Myers makes prowesses on lead (# 1415). The flipside «Let’s make up tonight» goes same, and is equally good bopper. The final side «Sing your song baby» (# 4861) has chorus and a fine guitar. Innis is tending clearly toward rock’n’roll, that he never really reached. Actually he never recorded anything after this last King 1955 session.

“The kissing chain”

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“Let’s make up tonight”

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“Sing your song, baby”

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king innis kissingking innis makeking nnis song

In 1961, King issued a remaining track from the Deluxe session of 1948 (unheard). Why this occurred ?

 

Further adventures of Louis Innis after 1955

He seems to have devoted himself to writing songs for others. Here below is a partial list of artists whom he’d work for :

  • Chet Atkins, « Mister Misery », 1954
  • Chet Atkins, « Set a spell » (vocal by Red Kirk), 1954
  • Fuller Todd, « Old fashioned », 1957
  • Brenda Lee, « I’m learning about love » (with Grady Martin), 1960
  • Charles Brown, « Christmas questions », 1961
  • Conway Twitty, « Portrait of a fool » (with Buddy Killen), 1961
  • Joe Henderson, « Mr. Voice », 1962
  • Jimmy Logsdon, « The life of Hank Williams » (with Hawkshaw Hawkins), 1963
  • Lois Williams, « Don’t take my child away », 1970

and a lot more into the ’70s.

Louie Innis also arranged songs for Don Lane (M.C.A.), date unknown.

Those songs were rejected for certain reasons (primarily because they’d take too much room) :

Oklahoma City/Foggy river (Sterling) ; I’d be ashmaed if I were you (DeLuxe)

Good morning Judge/My dreamboat stuk a snag/I grabbed for the engine (Mercury)

It don’t pay to advertise/Mexican Joe/What a way to die/Suicide/You’ve got it/What’s she got/She rurn’t it/Nobody knows you when you’re down and out/You’re not happy till you’re mad/Jealous hearted woman (King). A good amount of them is on the « Stomp that thing » compilation (on Uncle Gil’s Rockin’ Archives blogsite: unclegil.blogspot.fr)

My thanks go first to Uncle Gil’s Rockin’ Archives blogsite, and as usual, Ronald Keppner for the loan (scan and music) of rare 78 rpm’s. Then to Greg Adams (all music site) for the only biography available on Louis Innis ; to the people of the « King Project » (for Hank Penny King side) ; 78rpm and 45rpm scans on always fruitful « 45worlds.com ». My old fellow Tony Biggs for « Whammy… ». YouTube was useful too. There had been a whole lot of work for this issue : it’s really been a « labor of love » ! I hope you’ll appreciate the result of the study. Thanks for your comments : they always give me courage to go further and deeper into Hillbilly bopping music..

Late May 2017 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello Folks ! This is the late May 2017 bopping fortnite’s selection. It begins with a Starday custom disc on the Friendly label [from Milan, TN] (# 853) by RAY BELL : « Yodelin’ catfish blues » [what a title!], which is a cross, in my mind, between Rockabilly and Bopper. Dating from 1960 or even later. No guitar solo. A good song anyway which growns on one’s ears at every listening. Bell had another disc on Queen (obviously distributed by King), but a Jay Miller production: it is a suggestion of a Louisiana recording or at least a link. Same Queen label has a Miller protégé, Katie Webster. So the link may be strong. « Blues tavern » (# 24006, June 1961) is a decent uptempo hillbilly ballad. He also had two “leased” titles on the same date which went unissued at King. 

Yodelin’ catfish bluesfriendly Bell Yodelin'

queen Ray Bluesdownload
Blues tavern

Carl Butler

1927-1992

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CARL BUTLER is too well-known, and doesn’t deserve any presentation. Here early in career he adopts a high-pitched vocal, backed by good dobro and banjo. Art Wooten is playing the fiddle for this catchy « No trespassing » from April 1951 on the Capitol label, # 1701.
 “No trespassing

downloadcapîtol Butler  trespassing

Next selection is by three guys (brothers) also well-known, first as the Willis Brothers (led by the eldest of them, James « Guy » Willis) then later as Willis BrothersOKLAHOMA WRANGLERS. They put between 1946 and 54 on line a fine string of Country rockers and hillbilly Boppers. I’ve chosen – an uneasy task – two boppers. First the fast «Hoot howl boogie » from April 1951, issued on RCA 20-4309. Piano accompanying throughout the tune (Vic Willis), nice guitar solo (Guy Willis) over a fiddle part (Skeeter Willis) + two unknowns : steel player and a thudding double-bassist. It has an irressistible beat.

rca Oklahoma Wrangler sHoot

Second song is a program per se : « Hillbilly rhythm » (RCA 20-4848, cut rca Oklahoma Wranglers Hillbilly Rhythm"May 1952). Not as fast as the previous song, it’s excellent all the way. Fiddle part is more prominent, while the brothers sing the refrain in unison. Guy Willis even plays in a style Merle Travis had done famous several years ago. More on the Oklahoma Wranglers in a not too distant future, when I put my hands on biographical details.

 

Hoot howl boogie

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Hillbilly rhythm

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MALCOLM PARKER seems to have migrated from Nashville to West coast (or was it the opposite). The first record noticed was on a California label, Mesa 101: a mid-tempo, nice rhythm-guitar and vocal led for « The tears you saved », stylistically from the early ’60s, although the label indicate « Stereo », which may indicate a 1970’s issue: a great record for this era! Then a second issue on Code, a Nashville label (# 301), early ’60s too. It’s a great rocker (piano and great guitar solo) for « Come along with me ». Perhaps different artists with the same name ? I found (but unheard) one side described by its vendor as « hillbilly » , « The panther den/We’re through » on the Bee (location unknown : label too much damaged), on the RootsVinylGuide site, which is usually very helpful. But not this time ! Anyone help us all?

The tears you savedmesa Parker tears

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Come along with mecode Parker Come

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At last a woman, PATTI LYNN from Detroit, screams her « Same old blues » on Hi-Q 23. A real belting rocker from 1964!

hi-q Lynn bluesSame old blues

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illinois Ontario Wiggle

ART ONTARIO is a well-known figure among Rockabilly circles. He had releases on Dixie (« It must be me », # 2019 (Madison, TN) in 1959, then as Art Buchanan, on sparse Dixie regional issues or on Flame during the early ’60s. Now a rare Starday custom, Illinois label (# 725) presents « Wiggle walkin’ boogie ». A great vocal, an insistant lead guitar (solo) over fine inventive drums. A nice record.

Wiggle walkin’ boogie

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A jumping little tune now on an Atlanta Leo’s label (# 2016) for BLUEGRASS ERVIN : « I won’t cry alone ». Lots of fiddle (at times, played pizzicato, like a mandolin; at other times, duetting with steel). Steel is great, plus a clever guitar player. A great, great light country-rocker !

leo's Ervin  cry I won’t cry aloneBluegrass Ervin

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Finally FREEMAN ERVIN [apparently no connection with the preceding artist] in 1962 for « Living doll » on the Newbury, OH Bryte label # 241. Banjo-led, and high-pitched vocal. Good bopping Bluegrass to finish this issue.

Living dollbrite Freeman Living

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Sources: thanks to UncleGil Rockin’ Archives (Oklahoma Wranglers files) ; HillbillyBoogie1 Youtube chain ; RootsVinylGuide for various scans, as 78rpm-world ; BF CD for Carl Butler personal on this session ; RCS for Art Ontario.

Late November 2016 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! Another selection concentrating between 1954 and 1957, but with the early odd side from…1929 and the latest from 1964.

Here we go with SKEETER BONN (born 1923 Junior Lewis Bougham) he had a long serie of sides cut early to mid-’50s for RCA. skeeter-bonn-picI’ve chosen the two-sider #(21-6352 from 1955) « There’s no use now », a good medium paced opus with a Bonn in fine extrovert and exuberant voice over a classic backing of discreet steel and bass. The flipside « Rock-a-bye baby » is faster, fine guitar, for this eternal kiddie (?) theme.

There’s no use nowrca--bonn--use

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Rock-a-bye baby

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His next came in 1957, « Chained » has a harsh vocal and a lot of echo for a real fast song. I don’t know where it was first issued, on Admiral 1007 out of Wheeling, W.Va. or on Town and Country 129, a Polan Springs, Mo. label.

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Chained

download GAYLON WAYNE (Wayne Williams) next, was born in 1935 in Kentucky, and is best known for the furious « Red hot wayne-williamsmama » on the Tenn. Sure label – a bit outside the scope of this blog. I retained a side he cut on Delta # 1044, the fine Hank Williams styled « I ain’t gonna sing the blues », full of energy (drums), over a romping piano and a fiddle always present. Year unknown, maybe 1957-58. On the NL Redita 117 label which was combining every good tracks he recorded, « Steel guitar work » once attributed to him, is omitted : it was in fact done by a group Kiliman HawaIans.

I ain’t gonna sing the blues

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delta-wayne-blues
Now a wildie from..1929 (Sept. 29) by WILL EZELL (1892-1963) (piano/vocal) : « Pitchin’ boogie » was recorded for Paramount (# 1285) in Richmond, IN. with Baby James on cornet, a bass player and a tambourine. The boogie woogie craze was on its way ! His style remembers one of Jimmy Blythe, boogie and ragtime artist.

Pitchin’ boogieparamount -ezell-pitchin

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During the late 40s a basically Bluegrass group, that of the McCORMICK BROTHERS, originally from Westmoreland, TN. had their show on WHIN in Gallatin and WKYS on the Hayloft Jamboree. They (Harold, rhythm guitar – Haskell, banjo – Kelly, mandolin – and Lloyd, guitar – backed by Benny Clark on fiddle and Hayden Clark on bass) enjoyed so much success that in 1954 they entered Hickory studio on Franklin Avenue in Nashville to cut their first sides : « Red hen boogie » (# 1013), and later « The Billy Goat boogie » (# 1024) are fine duelling banjo and fiddle tunes, largely inspired by the vocal harmonies of the Delmores. These quaint although swinging performances led straight to Rock’n’roll.

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Red hen boogie

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The Billy Goat boogie

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Another personality well-known during the ’80s in Europe was GLEN GLENN (rn Glen Trout). He had a few records in dore-trout-sense1957-58 on Era in California, but managed to publish (in Sweden) earlier sides more in the Hillbilly vein. From 1957 came « I saw my castles fall today » recorded at Cal’s Corral from KCOP, Modesto, Ca.: a fine ballad full of emotion, with the guitar playing of Gary Lambert. Now to a demo from September 1956, « It rains, rains », a superb shuffler. Ralph Mooney is on steel. Finally on Doré (# 717), « I didn’t have the sense to go «  is more of a Country-rocker from 1964.

I saw my castles fall today

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It rains, rains

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“I didn’t have the sense to go

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Sources : my own collection ; as usual, YouTube ; Hillbilly-music.com ; 78rpm world.

Bill S. out of south Texas. Thanks for your kind words and visits. I’m glad to please you with my selections. Your comments are fully appreciated !