Curtis Gordon from Georgia to Nashville (1952-1962)

At 1 :30 on Wednesday afternoon, October 22, 1952, newly signed RCA Victor recording artist Curtis Gordon began his first session at Brown Brothers in Nashville, with RCA A&R man Steve Sholes presiding. Three of his own band members joined him in the studio : fiddler Charles Mitchell, pianist Curly Gainous and bass player Slick Gillespie. Rounding up the band were three of Nashville’s early studio A-team : guitarist and Sholes protege Chet Atkins, singer and rhythm guitarist Eddie Hill and steel guitar virtuoso Jerry Byrd.

For Gordon, landing a deal with RCA, the label of Eddy Arnold and Hank Snow, was a major break. A regional performer who mainly worked south Georgia and north Florida and did occasional national tours, he fit into the honky-tonk sound in vogue at the time. It didn’t matter that he had no national home base like the Opry or Louisiana Hayride. He was a regional favorite around Georgia, Alabama and Florida, and in those days major labels didn’t shy away from signing such acts, hoping to break them nationally.

Born in July 27, 1928 on a farm near Moultrie, Gordon spent his boyhood drinking in music. « Ernest Tubb and Bob Wills were two of my favorites.(…) Ernest Tubb was really my idol until I got into Bob Wills. » Soon enough, Gordon was trying to sing locally, winning a talent show sponsored by a Moultrie radio station.

His drive to perform never diminished as a teenager, though temporaly affected his education. « I went to Gulfport, Mississipi and worked with a little band at a radio station for six or eight months until my folks brought me back and put me in school » he says. Gordon also made early contacts with a fellow Moultrie resident following his own musical road : fiddler Ivy J. Bryant, years from his metamorphosis into premiere country-jazz guitarist Jimmy Bryant.

Even though Gordon’s folks brought him back from Gulfport to attend high school, he continued developing his performing talents with Pee Wee Mills and the Twilight Playboys around the area and on their program on Moultrie’s WMGA radio. Finally, on January 1, 1949 Gordon organized his own band. Starting around southern Georgia and northern Florida, he had enough work to keep him going. In June 1952, he and the band appeared in a talent contest at Atlanta’s Tower Theater. Impressed, RCA Victor’s Atlanta distributor Sam Wallace recommended Gordon to Steve Sholes, who signed the singer shortly after that. Around July, he joined the Mobile, Alabama’s ‘Dixie Barn Dance’, on the small country stage shows in the tradition of the Opry and the Louisiana Hayride.

Making Mobile his base of operations, by October of 1952 he’d opened his first Radio Ranch nightclub, which became one of the major country music outlets in the region. Over the next four decades, he’d also own three other Radio Ranches (a copyright name) in Thomasville, Albany and Moultry, Georgia.

That busy month was capped by that RCA session on the 22nd. Whatever Gordon planned to record at that first session, Steve Sholes, as usual, had his own ideas. Seeing Gordon as a potential ballad singer, he directed the session that way, having him record “What’s A Little Pride” and “The Greatest Sin”. Both were penned by Cy Coben, whose songs (both good and lousy) wound up being recorded by many RCA artists. At the same session, Gordon did better with the strutting Jack Toombs-Vic McAlpin ditty “You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet”, featuring bouncy guitar from Chet and Gainous’s competent honky tonk piano. Jack Toombs’ “If You Tell Me One More Lie” indicates Sholes had ideas to position Gordon to be another Lefty Frizzell.

With “Rompin’”s success in mind, Sholes, who’d pushed Gordon into a Lefty mode on that first session in 1952, decided to emphasize the uptempo numbers. From Georgia country artist Cotton Carrier came “I’d Do It For You”, a pleasant number in the vein of Carl Smith’s faster material as was Boudleaux Bryant’s “Tell ‘Em No”. “You Crazy, Crazy Moon” was a ballad that hewed closely to Smith’s ballad singing. Not everything succeeded. The corny, medium-tempo “Little Bo-Peep”, written by Tommy ‘Butterball’ Paige, Ernest Tubb’s lead guitarist, was more suited to the sentimental vocal side of Moon Mullican.
Throughout this time, Gordon was not just working around his home area, but touring America as part of package shows, leaving his band behind.

Though Gordon’s singles sold enough to sustain his contract, nothing came even close to the national charts. His final RCA session at Thomas’s took place on February 22, 1954. He used nearly all of the band on this date including Gainous, Slick Gillespie and guitarists Hugh Harrell and C.L.Hare. The studio players included Chet Atkins, whose fortunes were rising as the New York-based Sholes depended on him to organize Nashville sessions. The steel player was the dynamic pedal steel pioneer and RCA artist Bud Isaacs, whose playing on Webb Pierce’s hit recording of “Slowly” established the instrument in Nashville. Sholes returned to the ill-fated gambit of having Curtis parrot the style of others. As a result, his version of Hank Thompson’s “I’d Like To Tell You” came off as a generic rip-off of Thompson. “Detour” composer Paul Westmoreland’s “Caffeine And Nicotine” got an arrangement lifted lock, stock and barrel from the Carlisles’ Mercury recordings and their hit, “No Help Wanted”. Everything from the Bill Carlisle-inspired, frenetic vocal, rhythm guitar with paper through the strings and the Atkins guitar solo (he played on the Carlisles’ sessions), was clearly aimed at that audience. “Divided Heart”, a Chuck Wilson number, was an inconsequential ballad. One exception to the rule was the revival of “Rompin’ And Stompin”’s spirit with “Baby, Baby Me”, a boogie with sharply focused solos from Isaacs and Potter.

In 1955, Gordon and his band recorded another session, supplemented by Buddy Emmons, a gifted young steel player from Indiana who had just replaced Walter Haynes in Little Jimmy Dickens’ Country Boys. Gordon recorded two songs by a new composer/singer named Bobby Bare : “Our Secret Rendezvous” and “Baby Please Come Home”, a pleasant, uptempo honky-tonker. In early 1956 Gordon did another session with a similar band (Chet Atkins on lead guitar) that yielded “Hey Mister Sorrow”, “Too Young To Know” and “Play The Music Louder”.

By 1956, Elvis Presley was sweeping the nation. While many in country were bewildered by him, Gordon knew him well, having met (and booked) him the previous year. (…) Elvis was certainly on Dee Kilpatrick’s mind when he called Gordon to Nashville in March, desperate to get something resembling rock on record as soon as he could. Presley’s success was causing a crisis,since conventional country records – honky tonk tunes with fiddle and steel guitar – were suddenly sounding old and corny. Radio began rejecting those kinds of records, and Kilpatrick needed Gordon to record something that rocked. The singer showed up at Bradley Film and Recording, the first studio on what’s now called Music Row, with three of his musicians : steel guitarist Al Murray, Stewart and Slick Gillespie. The Nashville studio element again included Eddie Hill and drummer T. Tommy Cutrer.(…)
Four rockabilly compositions came out of this session, many of them featuring Murray’s futuristic, unorthodox steel guitar, in the Speedy West tradition. “Draggin’” was a hot-rod race ditty with Sun-style slapback echo and tough Scotty Moore-inspired lead guitar, Gillespie slapping the bass in the style of Bill Black. Hearing Elvis, Scotty and Bill at Radio Ranch obviously left its mark given the authoritative accompaniment from the band.  “Sittin’ On Top Of The World”:  Gordon adapted the old blues to rockabilly with stinging Moore-style guitar from Stewart and strong rhythm. “Mobile, Alabama”, a prideful rocker about Gordon’s adopted hometown, has become a favorite of rockabilly revivalists, one that also afforded the chance to hear more of Murray’s rolling steel.

Gordon did part of his time with Mercury while serving a hitch in U.S. Army Special Services as part of the Circle-A Wranglers. This Army country band had been fronted by Faron Young during his early 1950s Army hitch. While in the band, Gordon met an aspiring Oklahoma singer-musician named Roger Miller. « …) I heard him play and I said ‘How ‘bout you comin’ to play fiddle for us ?’ And he didn’t think he wanted to. I think he was kind of afraid if he messed up (that the Army would) ship him overseas or somewhere. And he finally agreed to do it (…) and played fiddle with the Circle-A Wranglers for a long time (…) »
In early 1957, Curtis traveled to Houston, (probably) to Gold Star Studios, where Pappy Daily, the legendary Texas record producer who co-founded Starday Records and discovered George Jones (now a Mercury artist) was to produce Gordon. With Mitchell on fiddle and, he recalled, Noel Boggs on steel guitar, he recorded three originals : “So Tired Of Crying”, an uptempo song in a mode between Hank Williams and George Jones, whose influence permeated “One Blue Moon, One Broken Heart”. Those, as well as “Out To Win Your Hear”t, were penned with Jimmy Townsend.

In October, 1957, Gordon headed to Nashville for his final Mercury session, Pappy Daily again producing. During the trip, he had a surprise reunion with Roger Miller that had far-reaching implications for the budding singer-songwriter.
« A couple months after he got out (of the Army) I was goin’ into Nashville to record. When I got to the Andrew Jackson hotel, the bellboy was Roger. We grabbed each other and was glad to see each other, and I said ‘Come up to the room, man. I’m here to record.’ So Roger came up to my room and we sat up all night writin’ songs, we wrote two or three songs. I told Roger that night, ‘I’m cuttin’ tomorrow and I want you to go with me.’ So we went down and Pappy Daily was cuttin’ George Jones, and I carried Roger down there and introduced him to Pappy Daily. Pappy Daily signed him to a writer’s contract and things went boomin’ for him right on. »
Surprisingly, for Gordon’s last Mercury date, he was finally recording with Nashville’s true A-team, including Hank Garland and Chet Atkins on guitars, bassist Bob Moore, pianist Floyd Cramer, Eddie Hill on rhythm guitar and probably Buddy Harmon on drums. This time, all numbers except “Cry, Cry” were Gordon originals. “Cry, Cry” was a down and bluesy ballad. “Sixteen”, an original ballad penned by Curtis and his wife, was aimed at the teenage market with Garland contributing juicy lead guitar. Curtis had someone in mind for “Cry, Cry”. « I wrote the song for Tommy Sands. I thought I could do it and Mercury said ‘Hey, why don’t you do it ? » He had someone in mind when he wrote the bluesy, raw “Please, Baby, ,Please” : Fats Domino…,who denied cutting the song. Instead, Gordon recorded it with Roger Miller and one Windy Wade singing backup on the session. The final song recorded at the session was “I wouldn’t”, a Gordon-Roger Miller tune.

In 1961-62, Gordon recorded two singles for the Nashville based Dollie label. They were all mainstream Country, and quite listenable, from the ballad “Each Time You Go” to the rocker “From Memphis To New Orleans”. After that, he appeared once more in 1978 on the Duke Of Country label, this time far from bopping.org standards.

No matter how much Gordon toured, Radio Ranch remained home base. (…) Looking back in 1998, Gordon reflected realistically about his overall success on records. « If I had to choose a favorite one of the whole bunch it’d have to be ‘Rompin’ And Stompin’ » he concluded.(…) He also had some luck with his compositions. In 1980 George Jones recorded Gordon’s I’ve Aged Twenty Years, on his « I Am What I Am » LP, though Curtis’s own mid-80s recordings for the tiny Duke of Country label in Nashville went nowhere. Gordon remained busy at the Radio Ranch in Moultrie thoughout the 1980s, as rockabilly revivalists rediscovered his RCA and Mercury material.(…)
In the mid 1990s, after fifty years of performing, Gordon, still happily married to wife Grace, retired from performing and the nightclub business in order to relax – most of the time. Nonetheless, in February, 1998, he was heading back to England, where he previously scored with audiences when he appeared with the Collins Kids, amazed that European fans remember the lyrics of old records that at the time, were ignored by the masses. « I wanted to retire. I’ve been in it so long and I got so many other things I would like to do but I love to play. I disbanded about three years ago. I still play other clubs but not regular. I go out and play clubs that have house bands. Rest of the time I’m tied up with a plantation out there with a beautiful lake, log cabin. I still love to ride horses and hunt. Never smoke or drank. I don’t believe in doing something that’s harmin’ your health. »
In a country music industry run by music consultants, radio and media consultants and accountants, rock’n’roll refugees and arrogant Nashville superstars who try to run their record companies, Curtis Gordon remain a vital link to country’s simpler, sweeter past. He summarized his career simply in 1986, a benediction that still holds today. « I hope I contributed a little bit to country music. It’s been my whole life. »
Curtis Gordon died May 2, 2004, in Moultrie, Ga

Sources: mainly 78rpm from the collection of Ronald Keppner; label scans (both 78 and 45) from 45cat and 78worlds, also Roots Vinyl Guide; photographs from Google; YouTube (Dollie discs)
Article primitively published in September 2009 (from the notes by Rick Kienzle for the BF CD), entirely remade in July 2019 with additions (Dollie)

Late April 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello, visitors ! Hi to old ones. The story goes on with a small dozen of tunes mostly issued during the ’50s (1950-59) with the odd item from 1965.

A short career (no more than 2 years) but a very prolific one : AL VAUGHN cut many records on 4 Star just the days before the 1948 Petrillo recording ban, and also some sides in 1950. Born Alton Faye Vaughn (1922, Arkansas), he later settled in Oklahoma, before eventually moving to California and got signed to Bill McCall’s whom he cut records for. Here’s the risqué « Right Key In The Wrong Keyhole » (# 1480) with fast pace, an agile steel which reminds one of Milton Brown’s steel-man, Bob Dunn. A tight little Western-tinged tune, of course ‘not suited for radio use’.

Next artist, HOMER LEE SEWELL, was a Southern one (Houston and Oklahoma). He first presents « She’s Mad At Me » on D 1067. A fast little country bopper, fiddle always present. From April 1959. Flipside equally good : « Whisper Your Name » is a lovely atmospheric ballad ; Willie Nelson holds the lead guitar. Sewell was also on Oakridge 104, « Country Boy Shuffle », a passable Country rocker , piano to the fore.

Mack and Gwen

We remain in Texas : Marshall. The duet of brother & sister MACK (Smith) and GWEN (Phillips) was active during 1959 and 60 and released records on their own Phil label. On # 1200 it’s their most famous track, backed by the Country Playboys, « Baby I Want Another Date With you » – fast number, good guitar and a bit of fiddle : the whole thing is energetic and moving. They recorded their production by Mira Smith’s studio (Ram Records), Shreveport, La. The flipside, « I Don’t Care What They Say About You » is a gentle bopper – loud bass, a steel solo and a welcome piano. Later they relocated to Dallas for their second issue (Phil 1201, the fast « If It Ain’t The Board Draft It’s My Baby », fine dobro) with another backing outfit (The Garlanders), finally on Phil 1203 they had « I’ll Be There With All Of You », a slow bopper, less interesting.

Ken Gabbard & the Hilltop Rangers

Nearer to us, here’s KEN GABBARD and the Hilltop Rangers for «Things Can’t Be As They Were » in 1965 on the Harp label # 15730 (a Trenton, OH label). A mid-pace opus, a weeping vocal and steel : an excellent ballad

From Oklahoma (where he’d begin with his own label Echo), JACK PADGETT went to Jesse Erickson Talent label, and released two discs between 1949 and 50. « Peppermint Sticks » (Talent 722) is a medium paced, typical late ’40s Texas bopper, good guitar and fiddle. On his second, faster issue, « Boogie Woogie Gal » (# 729), he is joined by the house pianist Aline McManus on romping piano. Great steel by the overshadowed Curley Cochran. Padgett’s base was KTMC in McAlester, South East of the State).

The Willis Brothers

The WILLIS BROTHERS (formerly the Oklahoma Wranglers) were a famous trio affiliated with KGFF in Shawnee, OK. They present an excellent instrumental – Vic Willis’ leading with his accordion – « Wrangler Boogie » on Mercury 6071, early ’50s. Then a shuffler with « Long Gone » on Coral 64175, 1953 ; this time led by the eldest of the Trio on guitar, GUY WILLS ; plus a welcome piano (solo) and steel. Later they went to Starday among other labels.

Billy Dee

Released in July 1954, here’s « I Can’t Get Enough Of You » by BILLY DEE (vocal, piano, steel) is a refreshing, joyful small bopping opus (Fabor 111B), while his other disc, « Drinking Tequila » is a bit disappointing : a good tune but average bopper – one ought to wait something better with such a title (Fabor 104)

Sources : YouTube ; 45cat ; Gripsweat ; HBR site (Talent) ; Ohio labels.

Early March 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! This fortnight is the penultimate of Winter and includes real goodies and rarities.

Arvis McRae – The Texas Keys

First artist in question hailed from the East of Texas, and recorded for the Texarcana label Ranger. ARVIS Mc RAE released at an unknown date (altough stylistic evidence and the absence of drums do lean towards mi-’50s) one brillant « Me And My Love » (Ranger 823). A fine bopper, solid vocal, a demented fiddle and a short but good rockabilly guitar, all these combine for a fabulous tune. By contrast, McRae’s version of Hank Williams’ « Long Gone Lonesome Blues » (Ranger 2074) sounds average, only one clip (1’54) being preserved.

Bobby Lord

Bobby Lord took the song note-for-note, and copied even growls and hollers from Jackson (who fooled Blues afficinados thinking he was a Black artist). Jackson’s original was a fast number, sounded very rural, gravely voice and acoustc guitars. So Lord recognized his debt : if copying is the best tribute one can pay, so Lord offered the best one coud ask for : « No More – No More – No More!» (Columbia 21339 issued December 1954).

BOBBY LORD was a newcomer when he was signed by Columbia late 1954. He came from the Tampa, Flo . area, and brought a song he had learnt from another Floridian, Andy Boyett ; Originally the song was titled « Colored Boy Blues », then changed to « Go Way From My Door » when recorded by Boyett on Mercury 8127 in 1949 as Monroe ‘Moe’ Jackson.

Lawson Rudd

Out of Kingstone, Indiana comes the next artist, LAWSON RUDD. His only delivery on disc was « Shake This Town » . Lazy vocal, unobstrusive chorus. A good mid-paced bopper on Harvest 709 from 1960, valued $ 100-150. His second issue, « Old Love Letters » has only a soundfile. A slow opus, weeping vocal and great fiddle. Label scan untraced.

Paul Howard & his Arkansas Cotton Pickers

« Texas Boogie » by PAUL HOWARD & his Arkansas Cotton Pickers is indeed a great piano pounding tune with a Western feel to it, and a long fiddle solo, to be found on King 779 (April 1949). Vocal part was done by Red Perkins (see in this site his story).
This track has apparently nothing to do with the song of Gene O’Quin (Capitol 1708, from 1951): different composers.

Clay Allen & the Cimarron Boys

CLAY ALLEN & the Cimarron Boys cut on Decca first (# 46324 in 1951): an uptempo shuffle, a discreet fiddle and a bit steel backing Allen well to the fore in « Evalina ». Eight years later as part of the duet « The Country Dudes », he appeared on the Azalea (# 112)
label out of Houston for « Have A Ball » . A solid country rocker, with staccato guitar and implacable loud drums.

Sally Lee

SALLY LEE next does deliver on Royaty 304 a fine bopper, the rollicking « Table Hoppin’ Blues » : very solid piano, an assured vocal – a reat discovery for you !

We come to an end with « (Looks Like) Our Hearts Are Out Of Tune » on R 515 from 1961 by LARRY GOOD ; A pretty melody for a good number. A welcome steel all throughout the song.

Larry Good

Sources: Gripsweat for Arvis McRae’s clip; Ultra Rare Rockabillies for Lawson Rudd; King Project for Paul Howard; YouTube for Clay Allen; Bopping’ Hillbilly 10 fr Sally Lee; my own archives for Larry Good among others.

Early September 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

I don’t know where DON WINTERS hailed from, probably Nashville. He has during the mid-’50s several good discs.

On RCA-Victor 47-6154 first he asked his Lady « Forgive My Mistakes » : a nice shuffler – piano, steel solo and an extrovert, really sincere vocal.
A later side (RCA 6348) « One Way Is Bound To Be Right » finds him, in a faster rhythm. A pleasant side.

Finally he embarked Rockabilly bandwagon with a release on Coin # 102 : « Be My Baby, Baby » is still Hillbilly Bop, but almost Rockabilly. The collectors couldn’t be mistaken. The Coin issue is valued at $ 150-200. Flipside « Pretty Moon » is pure heaven Rockabilly with its urgent vocal.

A typical Honky tonker from 1956 comes next with BILL WIMBERLY and his Country Rhythm Boys : « You Can’t Lean On Me » has a good steel (solo) and fiddle. A pretty nice record for the era. Mercury 70900. Just a few months earlier (February) Wimbery had released (Mercury 70815) « Ole Mister Cottontail » and on the flipside a lively instrumental « Country Rhythm ». Later on he was on Starday (« Back Street »).

Is it useful to develop on AL TERRY ? He’s already known since 1953 for his first sides on Feature and Champion. Here he is in July 1956 on the Hickory (# 1056) label out of Nashville for a typical mid-tempo Honky tonk bordering Rockabilly, « Roughneck Blues ». A lazy vocal and the lead guitar played by none other than Grady Martin.

Casho Box, Nov. 10, 1956

We jump back in May 1954 for a real ‘tour-de-force’ by the Father of Bluegrass, BILL MONROE : here it’s his « Whitehouse Blues » (Decca 29141). It’s the FASTEST Bluegrass tune ever.

Cash Box, June 5 , 1954

Finally from Texas in 1956 a jumping little Rockabilly bopper with “Dig Them Squeaky Shoes » by FRANK STARR on the Lin label # 1009.

Sources : my own archives ; YouTube ; various compilations.

Early April 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! This is early April 2019 fortnight’s favorites’ selection.

Lefty Nicks

We begin with a rarity, aimed at Rockabilly circles, and sold between $ 800 and 1000. On the Nicktone label (# 6020) LEFTY NICKS delivers a great « Model A Ford Blues ». An utempo half-sung vocal over great guitars and steel throughout tune.

John Talley

Then a well-known figure, this of JOHN TALLEY with two different styles. First an uptempo straight Nashville style – steel and fiddle solos, guitar to the fore – for « Hillbilly Sweetheart » on Jamboree 509 from 1954. Then a « perfect » song on Mercury 70902 : « (I’ve Changed My) Wild Mind » is a classic Rockabilly, with great guitar and a lot of echo, from mid-1956. Talley had another good tune, « « Shine, Shave And Shower (It’s Saturday Night) » on Tennessee 752 from 1954.

Eddie Bond & the Stompers

On Mercury too, EDDIE BOND & his Stompers and two classic sides, « Boppin’ Bonnie » and « Baby, Baby, Baby » (Mercury 70941, issued August 1956). Bond was from Memphis, TN, and delivers great tunes on a par with what Sun was doing at the time. Lot of echo, uptempo song with drums.”Bopping’ Bonnie” was written by Jerry Huffman and Jody Chastain, the two sidemen of Charlie Feathers. The B-side is a bit slowier with a touch of blues.

James Wilson

From Shreveport, La., the 17-years old JAMES WILSON offer in 1957 on Ram Records (unknown #) the great « Wilson Blues N° 1 ». Of course a bluesy uptempo, a good atmospheric tune with drums. The record when located change hands for $ 600-700.

Luke Gordon

Two sides now by LUKE GORDON. Originating from Kentucky, he’d cut in 1958 (May, or November) on Vienna, Va. Blue Ridge label (# 502). « Dark Hollow » is the old Bill Browning song, done here with dobro and fiddle. Gordon’s voice is well fitted to this type of material.. The flipside « You May Be Someone (Where You Come From) » is in the same style : fiddle and dobro solos.

Sonny Burns

Finally SONNY BURNS, a largely underrated Starday artist. Here he is with a July (?) 1956 Eddie Noack tune, « If You See My Baby » : it’s an uptempo with fiddle (Ernie Hunter) and steel (Herbie Remington) solos. Classic Starday backing : tinkling piano of Doc Lewis, and Hal Harris on lead guitar.

Sources: my own archives; 45-cat; RCS; YouTube