Late July 2016 bopping fortnight’s favorites, and the “Daydreamin'” saga!

This fortnight’s favorites feature will be separated in two sections. First we will be wandering between some artists of various importance. Second we will hook up on a familiar theme in 1954-55, that of « Daydreamin’ »…

First comes the very unknown from the early days, WALLY MOORE & His Tennesseans. He cut seemingly first for the R&B indie Acorn (a subsidiary of N.J. giant Savoy label), which had its Hillbilly serie : « A dream lives on » (# 317-B) in 1951. A sweet little jumping bopper with good voice from Moore. The steel is uninspired, but the guitar takes a fresh short solo. Earlier he had been on the big concern Savoy – again in its 3000 Hillbilly serie – for the proto-Rockabilly « Down at the picture show » (# 3025). He had also a good disc on # 3023, “Tie a little string around your finger” (announced by 7th Jan. 1950 Billboard issue); I include the reverse side, “A vision of yesterday“, a weeping ballad for a change, because of the mandolin accompaniment and the Hawaii style steel (which sounds like Jerry Byrd, according to the provider of this 78rpm, Ronald Keppner). Finally Moore had another record on Regent 170 [unheard] then he disappeared from my researching antennas.

acorn Moore dream

A dream lives on

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Down at the picture show

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Tie a little string around your finger

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A vision of yesterday

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Galen Gart’s ARLD gives the date of Savoy 3024 (wedged in between the two Wally Moore issues) as issued in January 1950, and Acorn 316 on March 1951.


savoy moore show
savoy moore string savoy moore ision

 

BB 18-2-50 Wally Moore

Billboard Feb. 18, 1950

 

 

curley sanders

Curley Sanders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The name CURLEY SANDERS surely rings a bell to many. He had first waxed for Dallas’ Star Talent label (« Last on your list », # 749), then he came to Imperial in 1951, Concept later, finally on Jamboree. That’s when in 1956 he cut his most famous track « Brand new Rock’n’Roll », a fiery slice of wild Rockabilly (# 590). I’ve chosen his second issue on Jamboree (# 1833A) « Heartsick and blue », again with the Kentucky Rangers : backing of piano, a rockabilly picking guitar solo, a good steel solo and a welcome mandolin solo over a urgent vocal. Sanders story was told in this site in March 2013.jamboree sanders heartsick

 

 

Heartsick and blue

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From West Monroe, La. comes the back-to-back Dos record by AL DOSS (# 944). Fine uptempo of « That’s my baby ». Quieter is the double-voiced flipside « Everytime you waltz again ». A nice little record. Doss had another good record on Dos # 945 with two boppers: “Why do dont” and “Everytime you waltz“.

DOS a

courtesy Some Local Loser

DOS b

Both sides have a “GS” written in wax; so a Gold Star recording location (Houston) is probable.

 

That’s my baby

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Everytime you waltz again

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doss doss why

Why do don’t”

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dos doss -everytime

 

Everytime you waltz

all doss BB 5-5-56

Billboard May 56. Thanks to SomeLocalLoser

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thanks to Ronald Keppner who had posted the  78 issue of AL DOSS in 78rpm-world. The disc was released in May 1956.

 

 

Then we enter the « Daydreamin’» saga.daydreamers pic

In 1954 on Meteor # 5014 BUD DECKLEMAN had a mammoth hit with « Daydreamin’ », the quintessential Hillbilly bop heard even in New Orleans [n° 2 in Cashbox charts], or Des Moines (Iowa), not to say Memphis [n° 1] of course. Sam Phillips had previously turned down Deckleman and was bitterly biting his fingers..Les Bihari (Meteor label’s boss), who had renamed Daydreamers the label’s house-band (for Jess Hooper, Barney Burcham and Jimmy Haggett), was very cutup when Deckleman agreed to the offer made by M-G-M, still in the hunt for another Hank Williams. Bud Deckleman waxed a dozen sides [all were released] between 1955 and 1956, and athough he had a small success with « No one dear but you » (M-G-M 11952, March 1955), his style really out of date at the time being eluded him the renewal of his contract with M-G-M. Here it is « I gotta find a way », the very last song he cut for M-G-M on October 18, 1956 (# 12419), and the penultimate issue (before # 12552, « I done fell too fer/As long as I can dream », a prophetically title !). Good, excellent bopper, very confident and driving. The story of Bud Deckleman can be found in this site, as it has been told in May deckleman2009. Unfortunately Deckleman’s career gradually came at its end in 1957, because he was out of date and, according to Q. Claunch « You’d never be quite sure you could rely on him ». Final record in 1961 on Stompertime # 1400, « I’ll be the one/I’m sorry now », a fine swansong in the M-G-M days mould. Deckleman died in February 1998.

mgm deckleman -way

I gotta find a waystomper-time deckleman sorry

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I’m sorry now

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And that’s when the story of « Daydreamin’ » begins, thanks to its writers, Mrrs. Bill Cantrell and Quinton Claunch. (respectively guitarist and fiddler on the  « Daydreamin’ » session) : led by Sam Phillips in astray, they wrote the follow-up,   « Daydreams come true » for Maggie Sue Wimberly at Sun (# 229) and Buddy Bain, Kay Wayne and Merle (Red) Taylor at Meteor (# 5027). Note that both of them played on the two sessions!

maggie sue wimberly pic

sun wimberly daydreams

 

Maggie Sue Wimberly, “Daydreams come true

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Buddy Bain, Kay Wayne & Merle (Red) Taylor, “Daydreams come true

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meteor bain - daydreams,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the meantime « Daydreamin’ » had been covered at least 7 times, first by Jimmy Newman (Dot), who hit to # 7 in early 1955 with it; then by Wanda Jackson, Carl McVoy, and later by Tibby Edwards (on Todd) or Warren Storm. I include the version made very early by DOUG BRAGG on Coral (# 61364) – recorded January 1955, it’s a carbon copy of Deckleman’s, which went unsuccessful. He liked the theme, as he even had also his sequels to « Daydreamin’ » on Houston, Tx. D Records 3 years later : « Daydreaming again » (# 1018)[with little yodels..] and its reverse, « If I find my dream  girl » ! Of course Bragg also recorded for Dixie and Skippy. His story was told in this site in December 2012.

Doug Bragg, “Daydreamin'”

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Doug Bragg, “Daydreaming again

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Doug Bragg, “If I find my dream girl

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doug bragg pic

Doug Bragg

 

coral bragg - daydreamin' D bragg - dreamd bragg - daydreaming

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources : my own archives ; notes by Martin Hawkins to Ace CD « The complete Meteor rockabilly and hillbilly recordings » ; 45cat and 78rpm-world. Michel Ruppli’s « The M-G-M label » (session details). As usual thanks to Ronald Keppner for his precious help on Wally Moore 78rpm. Thanks DrunkenHobo for the press snippet.

“I’m a whip crackin’ daddy”: the story of Ricky Riddle (1950-1971)

rick riddle 1969 picWith a mellifluous, deep voice often compared to western singer Rex Allen, Ricky Riddle was an Arkansas-born, Detroit-bred vocalist who gravitated to the western side of country music. His surname was apt, as he was a restless character, always on the go and never satisfied with life in one place for very long. Born Arvin Doyle Riddle on Aug. 22, 1920, in Rector, Ark., his parents moved him, two brothers and one sister to Hamtramck, Mich., around 1933. The Riddle family eventually settled in a house on McClellan Street in Detroit.

During World War II, Riddle enlisted with the Navy in Chicago, Ill. He served aboard the U.S.S. Adair in the Pacific Theatre. After an honourable discharge in 1946, He returned to Detroit and found a booming country music nightclub scene waiting for him; a result of thousands of new migrants from the South who moved north to build Detroit’s “Arsenal of Democracy.” Riddle pursued the life of a singing cowboy in earnest, writing songs and performing in nightclubs and showcases, sitting in with other entertainers and headlining his own shows.

In 1949, Drake’s Record Shop, located on East Jefferson Avenue, sponsored appearances by Hank Williams, Cowboy Copas and others at the convention center on Woodward Avenue. When Riddle’s friend, singer Eddie Jackson, was hired to open for Williams, Riddle shared the stage with him. Riddle was probably living in Nashville, Tennessee, by then.

Jackson visited Riddle in Nashville during ’49, and Riddle took him to witness his new buddy Clyde Julian “Red” Foley record what became a major hit for Decca Records, “Chattanoogie Shoe Shine Boy.” Compared to the size to which it grew a decade later, the country music business in Nashville was small, thriving through the projects of independent record labels, music publishers and promoters who tapped local artists working at Nashville clubs and radio stations; particularly members of the “Grand Ole Opry” barn dance at clear-channel WSM. In January 1950, Riddle’s first commercial recording appeared as the premier issue of the Tennessee label, a record company created by three Nashville businessmen, including a jukebox serviceman. Riddle’s “Second Hand Heart” on Tennessee no. 711 (numbered for luck, no doubt) was a good seller, and a hit in Detroit. Riddle cut several more releases for Tennessee over the next two years:

Second hand heart

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“Second Hand Heart” and the song on the record’s flip side, “Somebody’s Stealin’ My Baby’s Sugar,” were both covered by several artists, including Houston’s Benny Leaders (4-Star), Bill Johnson and the Casanova Boys (London) and, more than a decade later, Everett “Swanee” Caldwell remade “Second Hand Heart” for King.

Somebody’s stealin’ my baby’s sugar

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By 1950, Riddle was operating a nightclub in Nashville. He befriended Arizona singer Marty Robbins, whose first appearance at the “Grand Ole Opry” occurred in early 1951. Probably in 1950, Riddle bought author rights to Robbins’ song “Ain’t You Ashamed,” (# 715) which became Riddle’s second release on Tennessee, # 713. (Detroit musician and Capitol Records distributor Bob McDonald purchased a share in the song from Riddle.) Cowboy singer Bob Atcher covered the song for Capitol. The flipside of “Are you ashamed” was a good honky-tonk, a version (later by Skeets McDonald) of “Smoke comes out my chimney just the same”.

Ain’t you ashamed

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Smoke comes out my chimney just the same

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Tennessee 711 second hand heart

Tennessee 711B somebody's been stealin' my baby's sugartennessee 715A ain't you ashamedTennessee 713B smoke

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Riddle recorded Robbins’ “Heartsick” for another Tennessee release. He attempted to present Robbins with a recording contract, but the company’s artists and repertoire man passed on the deal. Robbins went on to launch a storied career with Columbia Records in May 1951.

Among other releases on Tennessee, Riddle sang a duet with Anita Kerr, leader of the Anita Kerr Singers, on a heart song called “The Price Of Love,” again attributed to Riddle and McDonald. On “Boogie woogie Tennessee”(# 717) (a take-off to “Tennessee saturday night”), Riddle had Ernie Newton, the bassman who wrote much later “Country boy’s dream” for Carl Perkins. He seems far from young on this recording, and the suave assurance of both Riddle and the backing group is almost at odds with the subject matter. Riddle made 8 records for Tennessee, one of them being “Heartsick”, the first Marty Robbins’ song he recorded commercially. After the label’s biggest hit played out in 1951-52

(Del Wood’s “Down Yonder” of 1951), the Tennessee label closed its doors. 

Boogie woogie Tennessee

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I got other fish to fry

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The tall, easygoing Riddle persevered; he worked on the Renfro Valley Barn Dance as Wayne Turner, but was canned for habitual drunkeness. He then cut a single for Decca’s subsidiary Coral Records in 1953, the fine double-sider “What do you do” and “You belong to another” (# 64157). In early 1954, he recorded the bouncy “Steamboat Boogie” for M-G-M Records # 11741, with steel guitarist Don Helms and Chet Atkins on electric guitar. Framing the clever lyrics of the song was the refrain: Steamboat boogie / Rock, rock, rockin’ along. But for the fiddles, the song rocked like BillRock Around The ClockHaley’s earliest efforts. The flip side, “A Brand New Heart,” was written by Riddle as a follow-up to “Second Hand Heart.”
Remaining Tennessee sides of interest: “Cold icy feet” (# 758) and the fast “I’m so lonesome” (# 801).
What do you do

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You belong to another

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Steamboat boogie

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Cold icy feet

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I’m so lonesome

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tennessee 717-A ricky riddle - bw tennesseetennessee 732 I got other fish to fryTennessee 758A cold icy feetTennessee 801B I'm so lonesome

Coral 64157A what do you doCoral 64157B you belong to anothermgm 11741 steamboat boogiemgm 11741 a brand new heart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1956, Riddle cut two releases for Decca Records. The first featured the trucker’s “Drivin’ Down The Wrong Side Of The Road,” backed with “I’m A Whip Crackin’ Daddy.” The single sounded like it was recorded at Owen Bradley’s Quonset hut in Nashville. Riddle’s second Decca single featured the Anita Kerr Singers for a country-pop production, “The House I Used To Live In,” and a song with religious content (he had cut similar material for the Tennessee label) called “If Jesus Had To Pray (What About Me?)” During the 1950s, while living in Nashville, Riddle performed as a guest at the “Renfro Valley Barn Dance” in Kentucky, and as a guest on the “Grand Ole Opry.”
His parents moved from Michigan to Tempe, Ariz., and Riddle traveled the country, visiting friends and family while singing in nightclubs along the way.
decca 29813 ricky riddle - driving down the wrong side of the roaddecca 29813 dj icky riddle - I'm a whip crackin' daddy

Driving down the wrong side of the road

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I’m a whip crackin’ daddy

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Around 1968 Riddle settled in Arizona for a spell. There he recorded the finest vocal performances of his career for the Rio Grande label, based in Glendale. For starters, he cut a version of the traditional cowboy song, “Streets Of Laredo,” as well as “Reata Pass,” his own western composition. Riddle reprised “Ain’t You Ashamed” and “Second hand heart” besides coming up with some swinging shuffles like “Don’t You Worry” a cheeky ode to overdoing it at the bar, and “(There’s ) Something In Your Future.” and finally “Jo Ann”. The band was top-notch, delivering punchy performances with quality production and arrangements, including a stellar steel guitarist.
Something in your future

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Jo Ann”

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dixie 107 hankg on bill

an untraced 45 by Riddle

rio grande 1001 something in your futurerio grande 1001 jo ann
With a broad, toothy smile, Riddle had a likeable personality and visited Michigan often, to see his siblings and their families, and check up on musician friends he grew up with in Detroit. While in town, he made the rounds of local radio stations and sat with country music disk jockeys for on-air interviews. At some point during the 1970s, Riddle moved back to Michigan and took a job as a security guard in Hamtramck. Late one night, Riddle walked out the door of a Detroit bar and was mugged. When police found him, he stank of liquor and the officers mistook his condition for simply being drunk. They placed the unconscious Riddle in a jail cell for the night. When he didn’t respond to attempts to wake him in the morning, Riddle was admitted to the Veterans Administration hospital. Doctors found that Riddle had suffered a stroke resulting from a blow to his head; he was paralysed on his right side.
Riddle’s brother, E. Marvin Riddle, arranged for him to live at the Clintonview Care Convalescent Home in Clinton Township. Relatives and friends visited regularly. Mentally, Riddle was the same person, but he was unable to sing and play guitar. To cheer him up, a niece often called a local country music station to request Riddle’s records, and they played them late at night when he enjoyed listening to his radio. Riddle passed away on Aug. 8, 1988. His ashes were interned at the top of the hill in St. John’s cemetery in Fraser, Mich.
© Craig “Bones” Maki, 2010

Thanks, as usual, to Ronald ’78rpm’ Keppner for scanning the rare Tennessee/Coral/Decca labels. Rest of the tunes do come from Internet, as: Ricky Riddle discography (Praguefrank)

Late May 2015 fortnight’s favorites

An important Texas artist of the ’30s and ’40s, (W.A.) SLUMBER NICHOL. He first cut records and had shows with the Sons of the Pioneers, then went after WWII to S&G label for the romping « Cotton pickin’ boogie » (# 3003)(vocal Andy Hallcom). He also had the first postwar version of « Cocaine blues », credited to T.J. Arnall. I never knew if this was actually Nichols disguising himself under a nom de plume. The song was reissued on Imperial, then covered by a lot of artists i.e. Roy Hogsed on Coast, later on Capitol, had the best-selling version ; Billy Hughes had his own version on King, among others. Later on Nichols had « Booger red blues » (unheard – sounds promising) on Imperial 8047, and now his track grows cold.

s&g nichols - cotton

Cotton pickin’ boogie

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slumber nichols

Slumber Nichol

 

 

 

On to Nashville on the M-G-M label by PAUL DAVIS, a nice bopper (great bass) with « Big money » (# 12357)(1956), complete with steel and piano accompaniment over a firm vocal. March 23,2018. I add another little piece of Davis (great lyrics): “I’m On The Loose” (MGM 12209) from 1955.

 

 

Big money

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I’m On The Loose

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m-g-m davis loosemgm davis money

 

 

 

aldus roger seu

Aldus Roger

From Tennessee to Louisiana in Ville Platte : ALDUS ROGER & his Lafayette Playboys. He has « Cajun special » on Swallow 110, from 1959-60. Even for me, French-speaking being, it’s hard to understand all the lyrics !

Cajun special”

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swallow roger cajun

From Texas on the Towne House (Sulphur Springs) label (# 11): EUEL HALL & the Rhythm Rockers for two nice bluesy country-rock sides, « Stand in line » and « Blue feeling » . Small but very efficient backing, a prominent lead guitar.

Euel HallBlue feeling

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Euel HallStand in line

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twne house hall feelingtowne house hall stand

 

 

 

 

Finally probably her first ever record from 1960 on the Zero label (# 107) by LORETTA LYNN, « I’m a honky tonk girl ».
I’m a honky tonk girl

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zero lynn girl

early October 2013 fortnights favorites

Howdy folks! Hope you are well!! Thanks to you,  more than 78. 600 visitors can not be wrong, so I will keep up the good work with confidence. Latest posts on the site: the ALLSTAR label from Houston, the JACOBY Brothers from San Antonio. In the process of a huge project on BILL NETTLES & His Dixie Blue Boys. More research on Buffalo Johnson, Billy Hughes, list is endless. I found new friends and contributors, first Herr Ronald Keppner from Frankfurt, Germany.

Here we go first for sad news. Surely you have heard sudden death of MARVIN RAINWATER on September 17. What a great loss, as he was one of the greats in Hillbilly/Rockabilly/R&R of the ’50s. Two tracks there. His original version (later done by the Maddox Brothers) of “I Gotta Go Get My Baby” on 4 *. Then his great (mumbling vocal, and a great slap-bass) “Mr. Blues” on M-G-M 12240 from 1956.
I gotta go get my baby (1954)

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Mr. Blues (1956)

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4* DJ rainwater gotta mgm ranwater blues

Harry Choates i946 “Jole Blon” had many sequels, including Floyd Tilman‘s “Slippin’ around with Jole Blon“. Here I offer what is supposed to be the original version by BUD MESSNER (with the co-writer of the song, Bill Franklin on vocal) on the Abbey label. In due course, there is the flipside, a nice shuffler called “I died all over you”.

Bill Franklin, “Slippin’ around with Jole Blon (Abbey 15004)

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Bill Franklin, “I died all over you (Abbey 15004)

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abbey slipping abbey franklin died

Back to old friends:the GEORGIA CRACKERS. Their story (and that of the younger brother of the Newman trio, BOB NEWMAN) has been told earlier in this site. I recently put my hands on one of their early renditions (1947) on RCA-Victor, “That’s the way it’s gonna be” (RCA 20-0038). Fine bopper. Hope someday RCA will reissue all their output.
Georgia Crackers, “That’s the way it’s gonna be”

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rca ga.crackers waybb 8-11-47 georgia crackers

Now for two sides from the multi-faced SONNY JONES. From New Orleans or vicinity, he was at one time called SKINNY DYNAMO (on Marlin and Excello). Here are his very first sides cut with Salvador Doucette on piano in 1952 for Specialty. Great swooping Louisiana Rocking Blues! Later he went on Imperial.

Sonny Jones, “Do you really love me?”

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Sonny Jones “Is everything all right

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specialty jones Do
specialty jones ieverything

Have a nice survey of the selections. Comments as usual welcome. Bye

early July 2012 fornight’s favourites

Howdy folks, we embark for a new serie of obscure hillbilly bop records. TED WEST is not an unknown artist. He cut 1952 for Republic in Nashville the fine “She Bent My Pole” and the equally good (with sound effects) “Parking Worries” (see in the site the article on Republic Records, from July 2011). He cut two sessions in 1953-1954 for M-G-M, which I did extract the nice “Call Of The Devil’s Ride” (# 11539) from. Backing accompaniment may be by the Drifting Cowboys. A good shuffler from the days before Nashville was not rotten neither too commercial. (more…)