Roy King, yodeler in Detroit and Chicago (1949-51)

photoRoy King is a completely unknown artist from the very early ’50s, who acted in Illinois (Peoria, WWXL), and whom anything is unknown today about. London16031 roy king freight train blues 

London 16031B roy king everybody knewLondon 16049B roy king new tennessee babyLondon16049 roy king mule skinner blues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yodelin’ way up there

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Rambling

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He had a string of releases, probably cut in Detroit, MI, or Chicago, on the London and Mercury labels between 1949 and 1951, and disappeared after this year. He was billed as a yodeler, and eventually yodeled a lot throughout his records, « Yodelin’ way up there » or « Yodelin’ polka ». He was backed by a regional outfit, Hal Fuller’s Tennessee Ho-Downers, usual guitar, bass, fiddle, and steel. Billboard cited him as a promising artist between April and October 1951, although there were no hits. He used to sing old favorites, as Jimmie Rodgers ‘s « Mule skinner blues », Roy Acuff’s « Freight train blues », a fine hillbilly shuffler, “Rambling” or old-timey songs like « St. James infirmary ». His voice is always smooth, a lead guitar is well to the fore, but the whole thing is certainly not hillbilly boogie, although nice yodeling songs. Indeed his style is similar to that of Kenny Roberts.

mercury 6338B yodelin'Mercury6401 roy king st. james infirmary

Any help to document this artist would be welcome!

As usual, Ronald Keppner’s help was indispensable. Thanks Ronald. Also Peter Mohr of Switzerland for the disco and support.
Freight train blues

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Mule skinner blues

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Roy King-Billboard-Aug-51

Jimmy Walker, the “Detour” man – a very underrated hillbilly artist (1945-1965)

Earnest Earl Walker was born in Mason County, West Virginia on December 18th, 1915, a few miles from the river town of Point Pleasant. Having been reared in his home locals and also in the Pittsburgh area, he worked as a riverboat man in the late ’30s before being drafted into the military. (more…)

early July 2011 fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks. We begin with the Starday label and CHUCK MAYFIELD, “Lucky Me” from 1955. Fine backing. Then, a perhaps surprising choice for Hillbilly bop, HANK PENNY, whose I like the drive and pugnancy of “Hadacillin Boogie” for RCA.

starday 161 chuck mayfield lucky me +RCA 20-4862 hank Penny Hadacillin boogie

Very early ’50s, on the London label, we come to HANK DALTON (was it another pseudo for Wayne Raney) and his great “HummA personality and band leader more than a good singer, DUDE MARTIN had good moments, like this Dick Stratton’s version of “Pistol Boogie”.

dude martin

Back to Starday and the fine, Rockabilly bordering Hillbillybop “Living High and Wide” by GLEN BARBER, deceased in 2010. He had previously cut the famous classics “Ice Water” and “Shadow My Baby” (which even had a sax – Link Davis?).ingbird Special”.

To finish, back to April 1956 with PAUL DAVIS, “I Don’t Want A Back Seat Driver” (MGM 12472), a loping rhythm on this fine uptempo. I am pretty sure this is the same who cut 4 years later “Six Days On The Road” for the Bulletin label, forerunner to giant Bill Dudley hit in 1963.

glen barber

Glen Barber

early October 2010 fortnight

hank garland pic

Hank Garland

Howdy, folks! We start this fortnight with a stalwart version of the classic Honky Tonk “I’m Moving On” (Decca)  by the great HANK “Sugarfoot” GARLAND (1930-2004). He appeared at 19 on RED FOLEY records, and never gave up backing on thousands sides cut in Nashville. Fine Tommy Jackson fiddle backing, and a short but brilliant guitar solo.

Then I go on with JIMMY MYERS and an unissued tune for the Super label out of Georgia, “Go Cat Go” (recently published on an European anthology). I wonder if this is the same as the one JIM MYERS who cut marvelous sides for the FORTUNE label in Detroit (the frantic “Drunkman’s Wiggle” for example). Here it is raw, crude Rockabilly…

Leiber/Stoller’s “Hound Dog(Willie “Big Mama” Thornton, 1952) was an enormous hit, and no one could know how many Country versions were made of. This time I chose the humorous version on King by CHARLIE GORE and LOUIS INNIS, “(You Ain’t Nothin’ But A Female) Hound Dog“, both artists I’d like very much set the story up in future articles.

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BB 11 mars 50 L.W.Evans London

Billboard March 11, 1950

Already a Country star, both under his own name, and as harmonica player for the DELMORE BROTHERS, WAYNE RANEY had many sides on KING. He also had sides on London under the disguise of LITTLE WILLIE EVANS, hence “Lonesome Railroad Blues“, in 1950.

One of the highlights of the regular Starday label: LONNIE SMITHSON for his double-sider “Me And The Blues“/”It Takes Time” (# 330) from 1957. Fine lead guitar and a firm vocal. Nothing is known about Smithson, who had another Starday disc, “Quarter in The Jukebox“, in 1958.   lonnie smithson Starday 330

RUDY THACKER, a Kentucky guitar player, appeared on the Cincinnati, OH, Lucky label (with his String Busters). Here we have an instrumental (a rare opportunity in Bopping…), the romping “Guitar boogie Shuffle“.

Finally a Rocking Blues by ROBERT NIGHTHAW. 1964, Chicago, Chess label. Backed by Buddy Guy on guitar and Walter Horton on harmonica, he delivers a very nice “Someday“.

Hope you enjoy the selections. Comments welcome! Till then, bye-bye…