LONNIE GLOSSON, the Hillbilly “Talking Harmonica Man”

Lonnie Glosson

Lonnie Glosson (1908-2001)
By the dawn of the twenty-first century, country musicians who had recorded as long ago as the early 1930s were a diminishing band. The harmonica player Lonnie Glosson, then in his nineties, had first been heard on wax in 1932, though few copies of Broadway 8333, «The Fox Chase» and «Fast Train Bues», escaped onto the market. In any case, records were never as important to Glosson as radio. It’s impossible to calculate how many hours on air he logged in a career extending across seven decades. His show with fellow harmonica player Wayne Raney, which ran from about 1947 until past the mid-’50s, was sent out on transcriptions to more than 200 stations in the United States and Canada.
Sponsored by the Kratt Company, manufacturer of hamonicas, the show’s job was to sell the instrument to listeners, with a carrot of a free instruction book. Raney claimed they shifted more than 5 millions harmonicas with their friendly person-to-person approach, which they recreated, years afterward, for a Tv documentary.
A great big happy howdy to you, neighbors. We’re going to be demonstrating the talking harmonica, and we want you to get a pencil and a piece of paper ready, because we’re going to tell you how that you too can have the talking harmonica just exactly like the ones your old friends Lonnie Glosson and Wayne Raney plays.(…)
Glosson was born and grew up in rural Arkansas, where he learned harmonica from his mother and hillbilly songs from the many amateur musicians around. After some teenage years rambling round the country playing for change in barbershops, he settled in St. Louis and made his radio debut, about 1925 or ’26, on KMOX. By 1930 he had moved on up to the WLS National Barn Dance in Chicago, and later put in time on the Renfro Valley Barn Dance, the Grand Ole Opry, and WCKY in Covington, Kentucky, across the Ohio river from Cincinnati.
Anyone in Cincinnati in the late ’40s was likely to hook up with King Records, the city’s premier label for country music and blues. Along with the thirteen-years-younger Raney, Glosson worked for a while with the Delmore Brothers. He also had a hand in writing Raney’s King record of «Why Don’t You Haul Off And Love Me», which vied for top spot on the country chart during 1949 with Hank Williams’s «Lovesick Bues».
When rock’n’roll began to crowd the airwaves in the later ’50s, Glosson and Raney went different ways, Raney to found his Rimrock label and build a recording studio in Concord, Arkansas, Glosson to a seemingly endless itinerary of personal appearances, mostly in schools. As well as his harmonica specialties of fox chases, train impressions, and “I Want My Mama» where he imitates a child crying «I want my mama…I want some water…», he would sing country and gospel songs with guitar. «I still play the tunes I learned when I was growing up in Arkansas», he said in a 1981 interview.

This is the less comprehensive story of Lonnie Glosson’s life, as written by Tony Russell and published in his book: «Country Music Originals – The Legends And The Lost»( 2010).
For more detailed information, here’s a link to a U.S. site devoted to Glosson: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~young/glossonl/lonnie2.htm

The first Lonnie Glosson recordings were cut in October 1936 in Chicago and are well in the « mountain music » tradition, although a rare Paramount issue did precede it from 1931. «Arkansas Hard Luck Blues” is indeed a medium-paced talking blues, while «Lonnie’s Fox Chase» is quasi-instrumental, or, should one say : harmonica (& guitar) instrumental with yells or interjections. The latter is a theme Glosson will re-record a few times during his career. And that Wayne Raney released (Nov. 1947, King 676) as «Fox Chase».

Glosson cut two sessions during 1947 for Mercury, probably in Chicago. The first one saw him record 4 tracks, backed by « his Railroad Playboys” among them I retain «Lost John» (Mercury 6057), a fast ditty (only detected accompaniment : vocal and harmonica, plus 2 guitars giving the rhythm) , which Wayne Raney chose next year as «Lost John Boogie» (King 719, Spring 1948), also taking the credit. Second song is «It’ll Make A Change In Business» (Mercury 6197, published in 1949). is more conventional honky tonk (bass and steel added + vocal and harmonica of course).

In November 1947, without doubt in expectation of the Petrillo ban (the call for strike of the recording personnel for the whole year of 1948), Glosson was called for a long, eight tunes session. One can retain «What Is A Mother’s Love», a shuffling weeper (steel) (# 6057) ; «West Bound Rocket» (# 6109), a train song, «You’ll Miss Your Dear Old Daddy» is a fine shuffler (# 6197), while «That Naggin’ Wife Of Mine» (# 6345, published 1950) is a fast ditty. «The Fox Chase Boogie» (# 6142) is very fast, not unlike the 1936 version.

The Decca years and the Delmore Brothers

In 1949, Glosson started an association with the Delmore Brothers by the time he was signed by Decca Records. They were playing guitar on some of his records, as himself played harmonica on theirs. They even had their own versions of his songs re-cut.
First coupling gave the lovely shuffling «I’ve Got The Jitters Over You» (Decca 46190) coupled with the more bluesier «Down At The Burying Ground». The cooperation between both Glosson and the Demore went as far as songs were cowritten; actually, Glosson sounds as he were a third Delmore. The target is hit with the following coupling;: «Pan American Boogie» and «Trouble Ain’t Nothin’ But The Blues» (# 46215) was cut by Glosson and by the Delmore Brothers (backed by Wayne Raney) (King 823, December 1949), and both top versions are nearly identical, except for guitar solos in the Delmores’ one. The flipside is taken in the same mood; one can only recognize the Delmores’ harmony vocals.

In the meantime, several months earlier, Lonnie Glosson had contributed to the mammoth Delmore Brothers’ « Blues Stay Away From Me » (King 803, August 1949) and co-written « Why Don’t You Haul Off And Love Me » with his good friend Wayne Raney equally big hit (King 791)(which competed in 1949 with Hank’s « Lovesick Blues » for the best selling Country hit of the year).

Following year (1951) saw Glosson release in the same-format as before «I’ll Love You Till The Cows Come Home» and «I Want you To Know That I Love You» (# 46361), both written and backed by the Delmore Brothers: that’s when their partnership came to an end. Glosson also issued a rather weird instrumental, “Del Rio Blues” named after the radio station location where he worked as a D.J.

In 1950, without doubt because of his contract with Decca, Glosson issued two records on U.S. London (ironically U.S. Decca was originally a sublabel to English London) under a collective name, that of «Hank Dalton and the Brakemen», with the Delmore Brothers and Wayne Raney in disguise. «Hummingbird Special» (London 16032) and Lefty Frizzell’s «If You’ve Got The Money, I’ve Got The Time» , again good shufflers.[according to a visitor, Alain Nicholas, London 16050 was done by Ray Smith on vocal, without Glosson, Raney or the Delmores]

1957-58 records

Then Glosson didn’t record until 1957 on Acme Records in Ohio (2 issues). «The Old Dutchmans Prayer» is half-sung and goes back to 1937 «Arkansas Hard Luck Blues», while «Get In Line With God» is a powerful sacred song (Acme 1145). The second Acme (# 1140) is unheard: first versions of «I Want My Mama» and «Train And Cat Chase Imitation».

On his own label Gloss, he cut an EP in 1958 (Pep-213). «The Fast Train» and «Ozark Fox Chase» are new versions of tunes already played and sung, but «Poppin’ the Blues» is a very fast harmonica/guitar instrumental and the new theme «I Want My Momma» shows Glosson’ versatility. He was about to recut it at least 2 times («No Name» and Starday labels).
Later on Lonnie Glosson released several cassettes of material unavailable elsewhere and are untraced, maybe sold at his gigs.

Two final notes and corrections (Jan. 11th, 2019)

An important visitor (you’re welcome, Alain!) does point that, as early as late December 1947 Wayne Raney had had his version of “Lost John Boogie”. So the meeting of the two men was solid and fruitful.

The same visitor thinks that the vocal on “If You’ve Got The Money, I’ve Got The Time” (London) is not at all sung by Glosson, but by Ray Smith.

Continental, Coral, National artist

This essay is, I’m afraid, far of complete. I tried hard however to set up the fullest story possible of a giant in his own time. Many a record was unavailable, although credited in the HBR tentative encyclopedia of Hillbilly (letter “G”) of Mr. Allan Turner. Several people were of great help: Alain Nicolas (and his great site “Les Delmore Brothers” [in French], alas presently out-of-the-way) for several clippings and images unavailable elsewhere. Merci Alain! The collaboration with Ronald Keppner and Karlheinz Focke, both out of Germany, was also fruitful, as usual. They opened for me their vast library of old and precious 78rm (Mercury, Decca and London soundfiles). The biography was written, as said in introduction, by Tony Russell, and extracted from his book “Country music -the legends and the lost”(2007). And probably one or two other persons who gave me some help at one time or another. This was a labor of love, and took well 2 months to be released. So I hope you will find something of interest in this rough work.

Jean Chapel a.k.a. Mattie O’Neil a.k.a. Opal Jean (1950-1957)

Opal Jean Amburgey (Jean Chapel aka. “Mattie” O’Neil-Holmes-Calogne) was born on March 6, 1925, the youngest of three girls, born in Letcher County, Ky. At the mattie o'nealage of 10, Jean wanted to pick and play like her father and grandfather. Her first instrument was the mandolin. “She tuned that mandolin to make it sound like a banjo,” Minnie says, “and with your eyes closed you have thought it was a banjo.” The banjo was a favorite instrument for Jean, but money to buy one with was in short supply during the depression era. Her father made a considerable sacrifice by selling some of his carpentry tools to get money for a banjo.??In 1936, at age 11, Jean began her singing career with her two older sisters in the Sunshine Sisters Band. After two years of daily practice and countless public performances, the highly polished Sunshine Sisters were in great demand.At age 13, Jean would leave home with older sister, Minnie, 18; and sister, Martha,17; to perform daily at WLAP radio in Lexington, Kentucky. They would stay with the station for almost a year. Even at this young age, “She was the star,” says older sister, Minnie. “She sang lead on most of our songs; she had quite the personality.” At age 15, Jean had already performed at literally hundreds of shows, appeared daily on radio stations, sang on barn dances, became a member of the Coon Creek Girls, and was about to begin what she would be most remembered for–WRITING SONGS! When Jean passed away in 1995, she had written well over 400 songs with more than 170 songs recorded and released by major artists such as: George Jones, Jerry Wallace, Eddy Arnold, Hank Snow, George Morgan, Rosemary Clooney, Dean Martin, Jim Reeves, Patsy Cline, Kitty Wells, Connie Smith, Roy Rogers, and Sonny James, just to mention a few.

The Country Music Association would nominate Jean’s 1973 hit “To Get To You” as one of the top five songs in the country that year. Jean held seven BMI song writing awards for her song writing abilities. However, her song writing should not be overshadow the rest of her amazing career. As music historian Robert Oermann says “her saga encompasses virtually every major development in country music’s history – string bands, radio barn dances, television, rockabilly, and the Nashville Sound.” At age 15, “Jean could play anything with strings,” remembers Minnie. The three sisters would move to WSB Radio in Atlanta to set up a barn dance program under the direction of John Lair. Here, Lair would change the Sunshine Sisters’ names to Minnie, Mattie, and Marthy. Jean would take the name “Mattie” and use this name on and off throughout her singing and song writing career. For the next 10 years, Jean would move around from WSB in Atlanta, to WLW in Cincinnati, to the Renfro Valley Barn Dance, to the Grand Ole Opry.king o'nail hiccough

Mattie O’Neil & Salty Holmes, “The Hiccough Song

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Mattie O’Neil and Salty Holmes, “Stuck With Love

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In 1947, Jean would marry Salty(Floyd) Holmes, an original Prairie Ramblers Band member, and a truly great entertainer of his day. The two would appear numerous times on the Grand Ole Opry as “Mattie and Salty” throughout their career.salit & mattie 2salty & mattie 1

Salty & Mattie “Long Time Gone

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In the early 50’s, Jean would record solo for Hickory Records under the name Opal Jean; record with her two sisters under the name of Amber Sisters.

hickory opal Tennessee

Opal Jean, “Tennessee Courtin’ Time

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for the King label in 1951 as the Sunshine Sisters, or The Amber Sisters on Capitol Records (with Joe Maphis);

More King sides (1951-52):”Our Love Is Gone

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Shackles And Chains”

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capitol amber lonesomecapitol amber lovin'king Mattie goneking Mattie shackles

The Amber Sisters, “Lonesome Road Blues

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The Amber Sisters, “When I Want Lovin’ Baby I Want you”

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The Amber Sisters, “Cherokee Eyescapitol amber cherokee

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capitol amber tiredThe Amber Sisters, “So Tired Of Your Runnin’ ‘Round

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and officially become, Jean Chapel, in 1956 when signing with Sun Records to sing rockabilly. In addition to these labels, Jean recorded for Capitol, London, Challenge, Smash, and RCA Records. She was billed “the female Elvis Presley” by Sun Records, which released her song “Welcome to the Club” on the flip side of an Elvis Presley release. Historian Robert Oermann says, “the finest rockabilly performance by a woman at Sun Records was unquestionably, ‘Welcome to the Club‘ by Jean Chapel.”

sun jean welcomeJean Chapel, “Welcome To The ClubRCA-Victor jean welcome

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RCA-Victor jean rockin'Jean Chapel, “I Won’t Be Rockin’ Tonightsun jean rockin'

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Jean Chapel, “Oo-Ba La BabyRCA-Victor jean baby

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In 1957, she sang « Ooh-ba La Baby » for the film « Untamed Youth ». A divorce, in 1956, from Salty Holmes would lead Jean to slow her recording career and begin more concentration on writing throughout the 60’s. Before long, dozens of Nashville artists were recording her works. The 1970’s would find Jean excelling as a songwriter and writing some of her biggest hits. Daughter Lana would also become a song writer with songs like, “Sweet Marilyn” recorded by Eddy Arnold; “Hemp Hill KY.” recorded by Hensen Cargill; “Kentucky Ridge Runner” cut by Lester Flatt; and “It’s For My Dad” recorded by Nancy Sinatra.Jean passed away in 1995. She had two children, Kenny Woodruff and Lana Holmes (Chapel). Her songs are still remembered by countless people, click here to see a list.

Special mention needs to be given to Floyd “Salty” Holmes, Jean’s former husband and partner on the Grand Ole Opry. Together, these two entertained thousands across television, radio, and personal concert appearances.salty & 6 harmonicas

Individually, Salty had a long illustrious past of his own in the entertainment field. Born on March 6, 1909 in Glasgow, Kentucky, Salty was a harmonica “virtuoso” but could also play the jug and the guitar with great talent.

His band, the Kentucky Ramblers, were legendary forming back in 1930. By 1933 The band was playing over WLS Chicago under the name “The Prairie Ramblers.” They hired a new girl, Patsy Montana, to sing with them. Historian, Robert Oermann says about the band, “one of the hottest, jazziest, most accomplished string bands in the history of country music.”

At WLS in Chicago, Salty would become good friends with Gene Autry, Tex Ritter, and Red Foley. 1936 would find Salty and Gene Autry heading for Hollywood to make movies, and then a return trip in 1944. Salty would appear in several B-western movies such as: Arizona Days with Tex Ritter; Sagebrush Hero with Charles Starret; and Saddle Leather Law with Charles Starret.

From 1933-40, The Prairie Ramblers would cut over 100 sessions for Gene Autry and Patsy Montana. They appeared throughout the country with Patsy performing daily at many matinees.

Salty Holmes (with Joe Maphis) “Cannon Ball Special”

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Salty Holmes, “Wabash Bues” (instr.)

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Floyd’s photo with the Prairie Ramblers can be seen in the “Cowboy Music Exhibit” at the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville, Tenn. Salty is also listed in the harmonica Hall of Fame in Holland.

Salty and Jean Chapel were married in 1947 until 1956. His career in radio carried him from Chicago, to New York, to Davenport, to Cincinnati, to the Grand Old Opry. In the 50’s, Salty appeared in Las Vegas at the Showboat and the Sahara club in Reno, Nevada.

Floyd passed away in 1971 at Elwood, Indiana.

(biography from Don Chapel, All Music). Additions by bopping’s editor.

Sources: 78rpm-worlds (Ronald Keppner, as usual – many thanks to him), also “45stalker”; Notes and music from Cattle CD 289

Roy King, yodeler in Detroit and Chicago (1949-51)

photoRoy King is a completely unknown artist from the very early ’50s, who acted in Illinois (Peoria, WWXL), and whom anything is unknown today about. London16031 roy king freight train blues 

London 16031B roy king everybody knewLondon 16049B roy king new tennessee babyLondon16049 roy king mule skinner blues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yodelin’ way up there

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Rambling

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He had a string of releases, probably cut in Detroit, MI, or Chicago, on the London and Mercury labels between 1949 and 1951, and disappeared after this year. He was billed as a yodeler, and eventually yodeled a lot throughout his records, « Yodelin’ way up there » or « Yodelin’ polka ». He was backed by a regional outfit, Hal Fuller’s Tennessee Ho-Downers, usual guitar, bass, fiddle, and steel. Billboard cited him as a promising artist between April and October 1951, although there were no hits. He used to sing old favorites, as Jimmie Rodgers ‘s « Mule skinner blues », Roy Acuff’s « Freight train blues », a fine hillbilly shuffler, “Rambling” or old-timey songs like « St. James infirmary ». His voice is always smooth, a lead guitar is well to the fore, but the whole thing is certainly not hillbilly boogie, although nice yodeling songs. Indeed his style is similar to that of Kenny Roberts.

mercury 6338B yodelin'Mercury6401 roy king st. james infirmary

Any help to document this artist would be welcome!

As usual, Ronald Keppner’s help was indispensable. Thanks Ronald. Also Peter Mohr of Switzerland for the disco and support.
Freight train blues

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Mule skinner blues

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Roy King-Billboard-Aug-51

early July 2011 fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks. We begin with the Starday label and CHUCK MAYFIELD, “Lucky Me” from 1955. Fine backing. Then, a perhaps surprising choice for Hillbilly bop, HANK PENNY, whose I like the drive and pugnancy of “Hadacillin Boogie” for RCA.

starday mayfield lucky RCA Penny Hadacillin

Very early ’50s, on the London label, we come to HANK DALTON (was it another pseudo for Wayne Raney) and his great “HummA personality and band leader more than a good singer, DUDE MARTIN had good moments, like this Dick Stratton’s version of “Pistol Boogie”.

dude martin

Back to Starday and the fine, Rockabilly bordering Hillbillybop “Living High and Wide” by GLEN BARBER, deceased in 2010. He had previously cut the famous classics “Ice Water” and “Shadow My Baby” (which even had a sax – Link Davis?).ingbird Special”.

To finish, back to April 1956 with PAUL DAVIS, “I Don’t Want A Back Seat Driver” (MGM 12472), a loping rhythm on this fine uptempo. I am pretty sure this is the same who cut 4 years later “Six Days On The Road” for the Bulletin label, forerunner to giant Bill Dudley hit in 1963.

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Glen Barber