Late August 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Very different things this time, from 1947 to 1961.

Ray Whitley & his Six Bar Cowboys

First, from June ’47, RAY WHITLEY & His Bar X Cowboss for « Wiihin This Broken Heart  » on Cowboy 307. Fiddle, accordion, guitar – a lovely swinging uptempo, and typical of the ’40s. Location unknown, very probablbly East coast. Whitley also released the first (?) version of « Juke Box Cannonball » (Cowboy 301), also done by Bill Haley in 1952, (Holiday) « Cousin » Ford Lewis in 1947 (Four Star) and Charlie Stone (Arcade) in 1954. Whitley was an actor in Westerns too, as well as recording (1934 onwards) on Decca, Perfect, Conqueror. What a rich career !

Change completely for Louisiana. ALDUS ROGER saw this record « Lifetime Waltz » issued by San Antonio, Texas T.N.T. label (# 106, 1956). Vivid Cajun vocal and marvelous accordian : earlier he was recorded by Jay D. Miller on his Feature label with the nice « Mardi Gras Dance » (Feature 2004):an aggressive steel and a good accordion, of course, from 1954.

Jerry Dove & his String Busters

Let’s stay in San Antonio on T.N.T. # 141 with a carbon copy (lyrics) of « Blue Suede Shoes » in « Pink Bow Tie ». JERRY DOVE was the leader (which instrument?) and Bill Massey the singer. Cool vocal, a really great and raucous, wild steel, an heavy bass. The flipside (« Foolish Heart » is similar, although less fast, a moderate swinging ballad, well done anyway. Value (B.J.’s) : $ 200-250.

Next cut on the Marlinda label (no clues on the label) # 1626. JIM RUSE delivers his « What Are You Tryin’ To Do » , mid-paced tempo, a good rhythm guitar (uninventive for the solo), a gay vocal very melodic. For Goodness’ sake, I don’t where I picked this one from..

Jack Fincher & Collin County Four

Another small Texas label was Skippy. I chose both sides of # 224 (1961) by JACK FINCHER & Collins Couny Four. « When I’m Stepping Out » is a good melodic hillbilly bop ballad. Nice steel, hillbilly vocal. The flipside, « Nickels Worth Of Pennies » do follow the same pattern : great steel and heavy ehythm guitar.

In a recent Fortnight, I’d publish EDDIE HAZELWOOD version of « Hound Dog » . Here is another goodie, « I’ve Gotta Lose My Blues » (Intro 6068), 1953. Written by Danny Dedmond, actually Danny Dedmon – see his story elsewhere in the site.

That’s it, folks.

Sources : 45 cat for labels, 78worlds (Ray Whitley). Internet for more thn one tune. My own archives. Ronald Keppner for some records (Ray Whitley). Viele Danke, Ronald!

Late November 2018 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hi ! This is the late November 2018 bopping fortnight’s favorites selection : I try to add regularly this section of bopping.org. Obscure artists and record labels, as better known ones, but the emphasis is done on lesser known tunes. They do represent anyhow my feeling for the Hillbilly Bop music between 1945 and 1965 (occasionnally I am sticking these time limits out).

First artist is DICK DYSON, whom I still doesn’t know anything about. I had posted a tune (« I Work In The Daytime, (She Works At Night) » in the early July 2018 faves’ selection, here is one more : « Warmed Over Coffee And Woke Up Kisses » is a fast song, a lot of steel and a very agile lead guitar. Vocal by Johnny Pearson. This was released in 1947 on Tri-State 103.

The November period is favourable to witches and haunted houses. JACK RIVERS on Coral 64072 cut in 1954 the classic half-sung tune of the genre with « Haunted House Boogie : piano, steel, and skeleton’s clinketings.

From Columbia, TN, came in 1960 the rousing « The Drifter », released on Maid 1000 by the Tennessee Drifters (with TOMMY MORELAND on vocal). Great trembling guitar over an high-pitched vocal. More of the same with « The Tennessee Blues » on the Columbus (located in…Columbia, TN, near Nashville) label # 1501. He released also the out-and-out rocker «  » in 1962 on Skoop 1054.

On the West coast, GENE O’QUIN delivers « I Specialize In Love » (Capitol 2578), cut in December 1954. A fast bopper, steel played by Speedy West and fiddle by Harold Hensley.

On the Houston based Shamrock label (no #) I am releasing RAY COATS (Collins and The Ranch Boys) for the fine « Texas Blues », from 1952 or 1953.

In West Monroe (La.)(near Shreveport) was cut the good « Just Me And The Jukebox » by the veteran BUZZ BUSBY on vocals and mandolin. A fast song, a banjo solo as expected on the small Jiffy label # 207.

Next artist was primarily a ballad singer. RUSTY McDONALD, a native of Lawton, Texas (1921-1979, aged only 57 years) worked with Bob Wills, the Callahan Brothers, Tex Ritter as guitarist or front singer. Here he appears on the 1951 released « Baby Sittin’ Boogie » (Intro 6035) : lazy vocal, shufflin’ and sympathetic rhythm. He scored big the same year with « Postage Due », a very styled uptempo tune.

The veteran TEX RITTER has an assured vocal and a dreamed backing behind him, that of Speedy West on steel, Merle Travis on guitar, Cliffie Stone on bass and Harold Hensley on fiddle for « Boogie Woogie Cowboy » (Capitol 928, from January 1950)

Sources : as usual, YouTube, Uncle Gil’s Rockin’ Archives, Internet.