Late November bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! Another selection concentrating between 1954 and 1957, but with the early odd side from…1929 and the latest from 1964.

Here we go with SKEETER BONN (born 1923 Junior Lewis Bougham) he had a long serie of sides cut early to mid-’50s for RCA. skeeter-bonn-picI’ve chosen the two-sider #(21-6352 from 1955) « There’s no use now », a good medium paced opus with a Bonn in fine extrovert and exuberant voice over a classic backing of discreet steel and bass. The flipside « Rock-a-bye baby » is faster, fine guitar, for this eternal kiddie (?) theme.

There’s no use nowrca-6352-skeetr-bonn-theres-no-use-now

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Rock-a-bye baby

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His next came in 1957, « Chained » has a harsh vocal and a lot of echo for a real fast song. I don’t know where it was first issued, on Admiral 1007 out of Wheeling, W.Va. or on Town and Country 129, a Polan Springs, Mo. label.

tc-1295-skeeter-bonn-chainedadmiral-1007-skeeter-bonn-chained

Chained

download GAYLON WAYNE (Wayne Williams) next, was born in 1935 in Kentucky, and is best known for the furious « Red hot wayne-williamsmama » on the Tenn. Sure label – a bit outside the scope of this blog. I retained a side he cut on Delta # 1044, the fine Hank Williams styled « I ain’t gonna sing the blues », full of energy (drums), over a romping piano and a fiddle always present. Year unknown, maybe 1957-58. On the NL Redita 117 label which was combining every good tracks he recorded, « Steel guitar work » once attributed to him, is omitted : it was in fact done by a group Kiliman HawaIans.

I ain’t gonna sing the blues

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delta-1044-gaylon-wayne-i-aint-gonna-sing-the-blues
Now a wildie from..1929 (Sept. 29) by WILL EZELL (1892-1963) (piano/vocal) : « Pitchin’ boogie » was recorded for Paramount (# 1285) in Richmond, IN. with Baby James on cornet, a bass player and a tambourine. The boogie woogie craze was on its way ! His style remembers one of Jimmy Blythe, boogie and ragtime artist.

Pitchin’ boogieparamount-1285-will-ezell-pitchin-boogie

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During the late 40s a basically Bluegrass group, that of the McCORMICK BROTHERS, originally from Westmoreland, TN. had their show on WHIN in Gallatin and WKYS on the Hayloft Jamboree. They (Harold, rhythm guitar – Haskell, banjo – Kelly, mandolin – and Lloyd, guitar – backed by Benny Clark on fiddle and Hayden Clark on bass) enjoyed so much success that in 1954 they entered Hickory studio on Franklin Avenue in Nashville to cut their first sides : « Red hen boogie » (# 1013), and later « The Billy Goat boogie » (# 1024) are fine duelling banjo and fiddle tunes, largely inspired by the vocal harmonies of the Delmores. These quaint although swinging performances led straight to Rock’n’roll.

hickory-1013-mccormick-red-hen-boogiehickory-1021-mccormick-the-billy-goat-boogie

Red hen boogie

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The Billy Goat boogie

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Another personality well-known during the ’80s in Europe was GLEN GLENN (rn Glen Trout). He had a few records in dore-8717-glenn-trout-i-didnt-have-the-sense-to-go1957-58 on Era in California, but managed to publish (in Sweden) earlier sides more in the Hillbilly vein. From 1957 came « I saw my castles fall today » recorded at Cal’s Corral from KCOP, Modesto, Ca.: a fine ballad full of emotion, with the guitar playing of Gary Lambert. Now to a demo from September 1956, « It rains, rains », a superb shuffler. Ralph Mooney is on steel. Finally on Doré (# 717), « I didn’t have the sense to go «  is more of a Country-rocker from 1964.

I saw my castles fall today

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It rains, rains

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“I didn’t have the sense to go

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Sources : my own collection ; as usual, YouTube ; Hillbilly-music.com ; 78rpm world.

Bill S. out of south Texas. Thanks for your kind words and visits. I’m glad to please you with my selections. Your comments are fully appreciated !

Bopping duets, last post (1947-1963)

Howdy folks ! This is the last post on bopping duets. As surely you did notice it, my English is far from fluent ; actually I don’t dream neither think « in English », because it is not my natural language. I really hope you can understand it, and excuse me for writing such intricate phrases yet very common. But I LOVE this bopping music, and let’s keep it first ! My aim is to figure the music posted with record labels and odds and ends on the artists.

mccormick brothersThe McCORMICK BROTHERS were a Tennessee/Kentucky family affair. Lloyd and Kelly held the guitars, younger Haskel was on banjo, Hayden Clark on bass and Charlie Nixon on dobro. They cut for Hickory in Nashville between 1954 and 58 a fine line of Bluegrass and Rockabilly boppers, among them this « Big eyes » (1958, Hickory 1080). Strong strumming boogie electric guitar and vocals in unison. They even had a full album, « Songs for home folks » on Hickory 102 (1961) and still are playing today.

Big eyes

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hickory 1080 mccormick - big eyes

Hickory102 mcCormick - songs for home folks
Chester and Lester, the BUCHANAN BROTHERS were another duet group. They hit big in August 1946 with the pioneering « Atomic power » on RCA, and revived a similar theme in November 1947 with « (When you see) Those flying saucers ». (RCA-Victor 20-2385) « You’d better pray to the Lord when you see those flying saucers, it may be the coming of the Judgement Day ». Good vocal and guitar duet. The song was used in 2009 in the animated release of « Monsters VS. Aliens ».

Those flying saucers

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Buchanan_Brothers

Buchanan brothers

 

rca 20-2385 buchanan bros. those flying saucerspalford brady

More lovin’

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PAL (or Palford) BRADY (1922-1988) was a native of Tennessee ; himself relocated too in Michigan, where he had records on Lucky 013 (Cincinnati), Clix (Troy, MI), Bragg, among others (late ’50s to mid-60s). His « More lovin ‘ » (Conteste 45-2) from 1961 has two voices for a good « city hillbilly bopper ».

conteste 45-2 pal brady more lovin'

 

 

 

Charlie & Wallace, the MERCER BROTHERS came from Metter, GA and began a professional career during the late ’30s. After the WWII they had their own radio show on WMAZ before joining in 1948 the prestigious « Louisiana Hayride ». From 1951 to 1954 they cut a dozen sides for Columbia in Dallas, with their Blue Ridge Boys (Clyde Baum on mandolin and Doyle Strickland (fiddle) + Wayne Raney (harmonica). I chose from their equally constant in quality output « No place to hang my hat » (Columbia 20927, 1952-53), very Delmore Brothers styled. After 1954 they settled in Macon, GA, and WIBB radio station before completely disappear.

No place to hang my hat

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columbia 20927 mercer bros. no place

JOHNNIE (Wright) and JACK (Anglin) were regulars on the ’50s charts, before Anglin was killed in a car crash in 1963. Their «Oh boy ! I love her »  (RCA 47-6932) from ’57 is an enjoyable jumping little opus. Earlier on they had cut the C&W classic « Ashes of love » (revived during the ’80s by the Desert Rose Band), and « Cryin’ heart blues » in 1951, supposed to have been recorded (but lost) by Elvis Presley on Sun Records.
rca 47-6932 johnnie & jack - oh boy I love her (57)
Oh boy, I love her

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pic Johnnie_Wright,_Kitty_Wells,_Jack_Anglin

dixiana 105 cliff gross hog pen hop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the Kentucky Dixiana label # 105 from 1954, CLIFF GROSS offer a sort of fast talking blues (with the band chanting in unison) with « Hog pen hop », probably recorded in Dallas. Gross was a mountain type fiddler, and Dixiana emanated from Bowling Green, Wayne County.

Hog pen hop

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Spring of love

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PAUL & ROY, The Tennessee River Boys, already discussed in another « Duet » feature (they had a two-sider on Nashville Pace label), have recorded for Mercury in 1953 « Spring of love » (# 6374) : it’s a fast Bluegrass influenced ditty – lead vocal & backing vocal.

mercury 6374 paul & roy - spring of loveshamrock 717 golden state always dreaming

 

Always dreaming

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Next track GOLDEN STATE BOYS‘« Always dreaming » was already posted here in April 2013. But I like very much this tune with its urgent vocal, the dobro part of Leon Poindexter, the vocal/mandolin of Herb Rice, and the energetic banjo of Don Parmley [personnel give then by a visitor]. Date : early to mid-62, Shamrock 717, Artesia, California.

A solid rocker (with drums), « Good gosh gal » on the Nashville Briar label # 111 by PHIL BEASLEY & CHARLIE BROWN. Nice guitar and steel solo, 1961.

Good gosh gal

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briar 111 phil beasley - good gosh gal ((61)

 

 

It’s useless to present the YORK BROTHERS (their story is on this site). Here is one of their rarest issues on their own York Bros. Records # 600Y-100, from 1963, and the great « Monday morning blues ».

Monday morning blues

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york bros. 600Y-100 Monday morning blues

 

colonial 7000 franklin bros. so real (Chapel Hill, 6-59)More of a solid rocker on Chapel Hill, NC Colonial label (# 7000 from June 1959) by the FRANKLIN BROTHERS. « So real » is strong, that’s not Hillbilly bop, but a real Rocker for a change!

So real

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We are going to the end with FRANKIE SHORT & DEE GUNTER on the Balto, MD Wango label (# 201) : again a solid version of Don Reno‘s « Country boy rock’n’roll » . Remember L.C. Smith and « Radio boogie » (2nd version) on this label.

Country boy rock’n’roll

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Used sources: Wikipedia, Youtube,ancestry.com (Pal Brady), hillbilly-music.com, Galen Gart’s ARLD, 45rpm.com

Pee Wee Maddux and Fine: Biloxi, MS, hillbilly (1955-56)

Mississippi-biloxiGo to a map of the U.S., search « Biloxi », and you’ll find this small city in the Harrison county, down south of Mississipi. That’s where the Fine label story begins. But before that and its debuts, we must look at its founders. Professor Marion Carpenter had a recording studio open to local facilities in Biloxi and was associated with steel guitar player Murphy Monroe « Pee Wee » Maddux (born 1923)[The visitor Linda Maddux corrected this: “He played the fiddle, guitar, mandolin and harmonica, not steel guitar”]. The latter’s name had over the years several changes : from « Pee Wee » to « Pee-Wee », even « PeWee ». He was also a songwriter (Kitty Wells in 1956 ; or « Fools like me » for Jerry Lee Lewis, or more « Rocky road of love » for Curtis Gordon, even Fats Domino : « What a price »), and his earliest efforts as recording artist (at least he is credited as such on the labels) are to be found in March 1952 on M-G-M records, cut in Nashville : « My hobo heart » and « Lover’s crime ». The vocals were done by a certain Al Britt for two average boppers. Maddux penned a good percentage of the songs on Fine, among them the Ernie Chaffin ones.

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My hobo heart

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Lover’s crime

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In 1954 the pair Carpenter/Maddux launched a microscopic label, Gulf Coast, which they issued a certain DAN SEAL on : « You gotta walk that line » (# 1012) is a lively little opus, but nothing particular, and it sinked into obscurity. But SEAL reemerged next year on the new comperes’ label, FINE for two ballads, « I wake at dawn  (with you on my mind ) » being the best one (# 1003).

You gotta walk that line

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billboard nov. 1955 dan seal:fine

1003 I wake at dawn

I wake at dawn

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JIM OWEN then came with the rollicking « Sie Simon shuffle » (# 1004) : it’s a jumping hillbilly rocker with a fiddle solo and one from Pee Wee Maddux on steel well to the fore. Owen had late ’50s his own Owe Man label where he issued « The key’s in the mail box » (see below). On to JOHNNY BOZEMAN and the good « She’s my bayou babe » (# 1006). Bozeman went afterwards in 1957 on Mobile, Alabama, Sandy label, which he co-founded with Paul Bose, and saw a classic horror rocker « Rockin’ in the graveyard » by Jackie Morningstar in 1959. Bozeman himself had « Blues and I » (# Sandy 1001)(alas, unheard) and what is described in a sale list as « doo wop rockabilly », « How many ».

Jim Owen, “Sie Simon shuffle

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Johnny Bozeman, “She’s my bayou babe

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billboard 5 nov 55 fine

November 5, 1955

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Other artists on the Fine label included ANN RAYE and his fine (co-sung with Jim Owen) bopper « Our wedding band » (# 1001). Raye had also had earlier 2 singles on Starday and 1 on Decca in 1956. Incidentally she was the daughter of local promoter Frank « Yankie » Barhanovich, and through her father’s activities, went on to share in 1955 some Elvis Presley shows in Biloxi. Moreover on Fine, HANNA FAYE had the ballad « It pays to be true » (# 1008). Other men : J. W. THOMPSON and the good honky-tonker « It’s your turn » (# 1007) – later he cut « When you’re honky tonkin’ » on the Toledo label (# 1003) out of Alexandria, Louisiana. Or B. F. JOHNSON : the fine bopper « I wish I could believe you » (# 1011)(great mandolin!).

Ann Raye & Jim Owen, “Our wedding band

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1001 our wedding band

Hanna FayeIt pays to be true

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Hanna Faye

J.W. ThompsonIt’s your turn

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J.W. ThompsonWhen you’re honky tonkin‘”

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B.F. JohnsonI wish I could believe you

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toledo 1003 j.W.Thompson

 

billboard 12 nov 55 j.w. thompson

J.W. Thompson. Nov. 12, 1955

 

 

 

 

fine 1011 bf jonson - i wish

 

 

 

 

chaffin

Ernie Harvey on steel guitar (according to Linda Maddux)

 

 

 

 

The most important artist however was ERNIE CHAFFIN who made his recording beginnings on Fine with « The stop look and listen song »b/w « The heart of me » (1010), before Carpenter and Maddux went with him to Nashville to meet country promoter Jim Denny and A&R man Paul Cohen. A deal with Decca never concluded but Fred Rose took Chaffin on his burgeoning Hickory label. 4 sides were issued without success, then Chaffin came to Sun, and Maddux backed him on such a classic as « Feelin’ low » (Sun 262).

The stop look and listen song

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The heart of me

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Ernie Chaffin [Hickory]”Get me on your mind

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Later on, Carpenter and Maddux helped a lot Jimmy Donley in his early career and got him his Decca contract in 1957.

Maddux cut “New red river valley” (instrumental) for Judd Phillips label Judd (#1010) in 1958. He died and is buried in Gulfport, MS, in 1993.

All in all, a short lived affair (Fine folded after 20 issues, in 1957), but a good starter for many an artist.

 

From the notes of Allan Turner on the BACM CD “A ‘Fine’ hillbilly song – Country music on the Fine label” # 392. Various researches to. Somelocalloser.blogspot for Jim Owen’s Owe Man sides.

 

 

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December 25, 1954

Ernie Chaffin, Mississipi hillbilly (1954-58)

Ernie Chaffin’s two Hickory records come from a single session on May 5, 1954 and all the songs were written by Chaffin’s longtime buddy Pee Wee Maddux. Chaffin’s defining moment came with « Feelin’ Low » on Sun in 1956, and the Hickory singles are rather mundane in comparison, although there’s no disguising the quality in his voice. (more…)

Rusty & Doug Kershaw, Louisiana men (1954 -1964)

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Douglas James « Doug » Kershaw was born on January 24 of 1936 on a houseboat near Tiel Ridge, Louisiana – a tiny island off the Gulf Coast of Mexico. Russell Lee « Rusty » Kershaw was born on 2 February 1938. Their childhood was difficult, and their father committed suicide when Doug was seven, soon after the family moved to Crowley. Their older brother Nelson « Pee Wee » Kershaw formed a band called the Continental Playboys, which the younger boys would later join. Rusty played rhythm guitar, while Doug began to excel on fiddle (he eventually claimed to have mastered 29 instruments). The band became popular and was appearing on KLPC-TV in 1953, alongside Jimmy Newman and Wiley Barkdull. (more…)