Lawton “Slim” Williams, “Tennessee Avenue” (1949-1960) to “Farewell Party” – from Hillbilly to commercial country

Despite a performing and recording career that spanned six decades, there’s no question that Lawton Williams is best known for writing songs, including classics like Fraulein and Farewell Party. This was true even at the height of his career as a performer and it remains true a dozen years after his death in 2007. He was reconcilied to this fact rather early on, and through he once claimed he wished he’s never recorded a single track, feeling that it had hindered his success as songwriter, he continued to perform and record into the new millenium. Any regret he felt about his recording career having restricted his opportunities as a writer was bittersweet, a double-edged sword. Writing may have been his bread and butter, but he clearly loved performing.
Williams wasn’t blessed with a particularly memorable or strong voice. It was plain, straightforward, and dynamics were not a strong suit, either. He usualy gave love ballads and good-time novelties the same earnest weight. Yet while his voice may arguably have lacked the distinction that mght have made him a star or the depth that might have attracted honky-tonk die-hards and critics, it had a certain something that continues to endear him to fans and collectors of country-music of the 1940s-60s. He also had the good sense to surround himself with fine msicians, including, for example, members of the Light Crust Doughboys – few would argue that one appeal of Williams’ recordigs are the spitrited backings.

Lawton Williams’ early recording career has been largely overlooked, and not because his early records are particularly obscure. They are fairy obscure, cut for independant labels like Fortune and Four Star or in rather low-profile setting for bigger labels like Coral. But that obscurity owes at last as much to the fact that they were issued under other names. Slim Williams in most instances, and Ed Lawton in one case. Those deeply into the country scene of the era, beyond the major and mid-level stars, will know that Lawton and Slim are the same, but the fact might be lost on the average fan, if they’ve heard of Slim Williams at all.

He was born into a musical family in Troy, Tennessee on July 24, 1922. His father was a fiddler, his mother played piano and sang. « They weren’t professionals, » he recalled, « but they sure sounded good on the hill. » While still a kid, he began secrety picking a brother’s guitar. From early on, he was listening to the Grand Ole Opry and the performers like the Carter Family and Jimmie Rodgers. As he grew, he gravitated toward the emerging singing cowbys, particularly Gene Autry and Cowboy Slim Rinehart, from whom he borrowed his early stage name and he later befriended before the latter’s untimely death in a 1948 car wreck. Williams began his professional career not Tennessee, but north in Detroit, playing in the country music clubs that sprang in and around the city before WWII in response of the large concentration of southerners who had moved there to seek work in the flourishing auto industry. Drafted n 1942, he served in Texas and sat in with local bands in Houston and elsewhere, striking up a particularly close friendship with Floyd Tillman, who was also in the service. « He really taught me the fundamentals of songwritng, » Williams recalled, « I learned a lot from him. » Soon artists like Cliff Bruner and Laura Lee Owens were recording Williams’ songs.

1930 census for Williams’ family

Slim Williams and The Sons Of The Prairie

He remained in Texas after the war, though he’d had to adapt after losing several fingers on his picking hand in a service-related injury. He worked at KEYS in Corpus Christi, and at KTHT n Houston before heading back to Detroit in the spring of 1947, where he caught on at WJR. Following Rinehart’s death in Michigan the following year, Williams went back to Texas, working for another fine songwrier, announcer Babe Frisch, at KTRH in Houston. In March 1949, he returned north, to WKMH in Dearborn. He’d recorded previously for the Sultan label in Detroit (f any discs were released, they have never surfaced), and soon after arriving back north cut a session for the rising local Fortune that featured Kentucky guitarist Jeff Durham.

Billboard Sept. 10, 1949

After a year in Michigan, Williams returned to Texas for good in the spring of 1950. He first stopped in Ft. Worth, catching at KTNC. Round this time, Hank Locklin hit with Williams’ « Paper Face » and, through Locklin, Williams signed to Four Star, cutting a session in Houston with Locklin’s band that summer, the line-up including guitarist Hamp Stephens, steel man Bill Freeman and others. He briefly relocated to Houston that autumn, but in 1951 he returned to Ft. Worth area for good and was soon established as one of the top country deejays in the area.

Slim Williams

In 1951, Williams was signed to Decca’s Coral subsidiary and cut two sessions with local music legends the Light Crust Doughboys at Cliff Herring’s studio in Ft. Worth. The Doughboys included Carol Hubbard on fiddle, Paul Blunt on steel (he also overdubbed piano on the 2nd session), Lefty Perkins on lead guitar (his wicked solos are among his best), Marvin Montgomery on rhythm guitar and Red Kidwell on bass. Everything was written or co-written by Williams. The Coral recordings didn’t sell well and, though he continued to perform and deejay, he soon sought other employment.

When he signed to Imperial in 1952, he was working for a local car dealer, using the name Ed Lawton, and the first of his releases on Imperial bore that name. »Emergency Call » was often thought not to have been issued, but it was, erroneously being labelled on release as « Have Mercy On Me ». The latter got hs own proper release a few months later. The Imperial session included steel guitarist Charlie Owens and fiddler B. D. Owens, later a well-known Ft. Worth politician. Like its predecessors, the session did not sell well enough to warrant a follow-up and Williams did not record again until 1957, when Bobby Helms had a major hit with Williams’ « Fraulein » and Hank Locklin with his « Geisha Girl ».

Lawton Williams

LAWTON WILLIAMS ON RCA

LAWTON WILLIAMS:
Lawton Williams(vo) with Thomas “Tommy” Jackson(fiddle) Floyd Cramer(p) Thomas Grady Martin(lead g) Velma E. Williams Smith(rh g) Buddy Emmons(steel g) Roy M. “Junior” Huskey Jr.(b).
(RCA Victor Studio) Nashville,October 14,1957 (19:30-22:30)

H2WB-5676 Don’t burn the bridge behind you RCA Victor 20/47-7105
H2WB-5677 Foreign love –
H2WB-5678 Blue grass skirt
H2WB-5679 Train of thought

All titles issued on Bear Family(G)BFX 15178.

LAWTON WILLIAMS:
Lawton Williams(vo) with Floyd Cramer(p) Chet Atkins(el g) James “Jimmie” Selph(rh g) Jerry Byrd(b) Murray M. “Buddy” Harman(dm).
(RCA Victor Studio) Nashville,February 10,1958 (19:00-22:00)

J2WB-0387 Rhinelander waltz
J2WB-0388 The casino on the hill RCA Victor 20/47-7188
J2WB-0389 If you’re waiting on me –
J2WB-0390 I’ll still love you

All titles issued on Bear Family(G)BFX 15178.

LAWTON WILLIAMS:
Lawton Williams(vo) with ?
(Demo session) Fort Worth,Texas,           1959

K2WB-2803 Moon Joe RCA Victor 47-7580
K2WB-2804 Lightning Jones –

Both titles also issued on Bear Family(G)BFX 15178.

LAWTON WILLIAMS:
Lawton Williams(vo) with Floyd Cramer(p) Velma E. Williams Smith,Jerry G. Kennedy(g) Henry P. Strzelecki(b) Louis Dunn(dm) & The Jordanaires (Hugh Gordon Walker,Neal Matthews Jr.,Raymond C. Walker,Hoyt H. Hawkins) (chorus).
(RCA Victor Studio) Nashville,August 7,1962 (09:30-12:30)

N2WW-0840 Carpet baggers Groove 58-0011
Bear Family(G)BFX 15178
N2WW-0841 Don’t destroy me RCA Victor 47-8142
N2WW-0842 Mama pinch a penny Groove 58-0011
Bear Family(G)BFX 15178

LAWTON WILLIAMS:
Lawton Wiliams(vo with ?
(RCA Victor Studio) Nashville,November   ,1962

N2WW-5125 In love with you RCA Victor 47-8203
N2WW-5126 Mountain of a man –
N2WW-5127 It looks like you love me RCA Victor 47-8300
N2WW-5128 Rock of GIbraltar RCA Victor 47-8142

LAWTON WILLIAMS:
Lawton Williams(vo) with Floyd Cramer(p) Charlie McCoy(hca) Jerry Glenn Kennedy, Ray Edenton(g) Henry P.Strzelecki(b) Murray M. “Buddy” Harman(dm) The Jordanaires (Hugh Gordon Stoker,Neal Matthews Jr.,Raymond C. Walker,Hoyt H. Hawkins) & Mildred Kirkham(chorus).
(RCA Victor Studio) Nashville,October 16,1963 (19:00-22:00)

PWA4-0510 Stay on the ball RCA Victor 47-8359
Bear Family(G)BFX 15178
PWA4-0511 I’m not here RCA Victor 47-8359,74-0109
PWA4-0512 Squawlein RCA Victor 47-8300
Bear Family(G)BFX 15178

LAWTON WILLIAMS:
Lawton Williams(vo) with Hargus “Pig” Robbins(p) Harold Ray Bradley,Ray Edenton(g) Pete Drake(steel g) Bob L. Moore(b) Murray M. “Buddy” Harman Jr.(dm) Anita Kerr,Dorothy Ann Dillard,Louis Dean Nunley, William Guifford Wright Jr. (chorus).
(RCA Victor Studio) Nashville,June 22,1964 (09:00-12:00)

RWA4-1281 Everything’s O.K. on the L.B.J. RCA Victor 47-8407
Bear Family(G)BFX 15178
RWA4-1282 Don’t look down RCA Victor 47-8407
RWA4-1283 Big Jim unissued

LAWTON WILLIAMS:
Lawton Williams(vo) with ?
(RCA Victor Studio) Nashville,December   ,1964 (Prod.Bob Ferguson)

RWA4-1651 War on poverty RCA Victor 47-8514
RWA4-1652 Big Jim unissued
RWA4-1653 The power of love RCA Victor 47-8514

LAWTON WILLIAMS:
Lawton Williams(vo) overdubbed on RWA4-1281 original playback.
(RCA Victor Studio) Nashville,January 8,1969 (10:00-13:00)

XWA4-1208 Everything’s O.K. on the L.B.J.,pt.2 RCA Victor 74-0109
Bear Family(G)BFX 15178

No longer using the nickname Slim, he signed to Locklin’s label RCA. Stints with Decca, Mercury and RCA again would follow over the next half dozen years.

Casino On The Hill (1958) (Big D Jamboree)

by Lawton Williams

Some of Williams’ major label singles were Texas recordings he produced himself. During autumn and winter of 1959-60, he had become one of the stalwarts of the Big D Jamboree , where he would remain until this show’s demise in 1988. He then cut for Pappy Daily’s D label out of Houston (it had probably under Daily’s guidance that Williams had cut one Four Star session in 1950) and Major Bill Smith’s Le Bill label. This last single was soon picked up on Dan Mechura’s All-Star label, seeing the first release of « Farewell Party », which would be a hit for Jimmy Dickens the following year, then for Gene Watson.

Billboard July 4, 1960

He had given up full-time music making to become a bailiff for Ft Worth Tarrat County, where he lived for the last few decades of his life. Despite the demands of that job, he remained active as both a performer and writer, increasing these activities following his retirement. He died aged 85 in 2007.
Kevin Coffey

Sources: mainly from Ronald Keppner 78rpm; labels from 45cat/78world; music from various sources, among them Gripsweat (some rare 78rpm); RCA recording files courtesy from Michel Ruppli, the indefatigable discographer; personal pictures from Google.
Small note: no RCA recording neither some later Decca discs were included, as not pertaining to “bopping” standards. “Farewell Party” was the sole exception, although being a commercial country record.

Late May 2019 bopping fortnight favorites

Howdy folks! Here we go again for a new selection (rather a short ne) of bopping favorites. They range from late ’40s (Cousin Deems Sanders) to late ’50s (Ray Stone). With the odd issue from Detroit (Peter De Bree) or California (Gene Crabb), they are all Texas records.

Cousin Deems Sanders and his Goat Herders with Walt McCoy

On the then big concern Crystal (# 246), let’s enjoy to the first selection’s choice, “Goatburger Boogie”: a bouncing instrumental. A boogie pattern guitar, a swooping piano and a demented fiddle. McCoy also released “Cowboy Boogie” and “I’m Gonna Get A Honky Tonk Angel”, reviewed in March 2019’s fortnight.

Jill Turner acc. by Art West & his Sunset Riders

From February 1946, on the Urban label (# 111), Jill Turner offer a fast (bit on the novelty side) “I’m Going Down To The Mountain”. A good fiddle, and a fine interplay between accordion and steel. She also had “Yodeling Cow Girl” on Urban 117.

Tony Farr

This artist, billed “And His Swinging Guitar”, comes next with two records on the Enterprise label based in Beaumont, Texas. “What’s The Use” has a nice guitar, but the fiddle is prominent (# 1208) on this 1958 issue, while “There’s No else In Marrying Me” (# 1211) is a jumping tune with a similar instrumentation.

Peter De Bree

In 1957 and Detroit, MI. Peter De Bree cut for Fortune Record (# 193) a rocked up version of the Hank Williams’ classic, “My Bucket’s Got A Hole In It”. A solid piano takes the lead all through, while the guitar is largely overshadowed. Vocal of Bernie Sanders is OK. Nevertheless a good rocker.

Leonard Clark & the Land of Sky Boys

On the small label of Klub # 3108, located in South Carolina, here’s Leonard Clark for the Rockabilly “Come To Your Tommy Now”; assured vocal, good guitar and piano for a 1962 record.

Gene Crabb & his Round Up Rhythm Boys

Rural Rhythm in California was owned by the songwriter Johnny O’Neal, and issued important records by Johnny Tyler, Kenny Smith or Johnny Skiles between 1955 and 1960. Here is Gene Crabb (actually a drummer) and his “Blues Won’t Bother Me” (# 506): bass chords guitar, very effective steel and the good vocal of one Eddie Willis. Crabb had done in ’53 on the Richtone label (# 353, location: Dallas) the very nice “Truck Stop Lucy”, and co-worked with Eddie Miller on 4 *. He released also “Gotta Have A Woman/I’ve tried” on Rural Rhythm 529.

Ray Stone

On T.N.T. 169 (1959) we finally found Ray Stone and “China Doll”, a fine rocker – a clicking guitar. The whole is a complete change with the previous records. He also sang fronting Jerry Dove’s band on # 173 (“Why Don’t You Love Me”).
Sources : my own archives ; HBR for Rural Rhythm; Ultra Rare Rockabilly’s for Leonard Clark; YouTube (Tony Farr, Peter De Bree). Jill Turner picture from “Hop Bop’n’Hop” As you without doubt noticed, I was writing this feature with a lack of inspiration. Be sure however the music comes first. Thanks for forthcoming comments.

Late March 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Late March 2019 fortnight’s favorites : the 6th of this year, and once more 9 goodies in Hillbilly bop style, from 1952 to 1965.

Wade Ray

He was a fiddler (1913-1998) and leader of a Western swing orchestra during the early ’50s, between Indiana and Illinois. Here a delivers an energetic (no fiddle, but drums) trucker song, « Idaho Red » from early 1954, on the RCA-Victor label (# 20-5624).

Burrie Manso & the Bonnivilles

On the Town-Crier label (# 200) from an unknown location (no clue from the record label), BURRIE MANSO and the Bonnivilles delivers a Rockabilly rocker with the $ 600-700 tag, « My Woman ». Very fine guitar, reminiscent of Scotty Moore, on this disc from 1960.

Bill Hicks & the Southerneers

From Detroit, although backed by the Southerneers (no doubt in order to attract real South expatriates in Michigan), BILL HICKS did cut in 1957 two fine songs for Fortune records # 188 : first a slow one, « She’s Done Gone », with a good guitar throughout ; second an uptempo and over a boogie guitar, with an almost surreal sound to them. Hicks had also records on Hi-Q and Happy Hearts.

Honey & Sonny (he Davis Twins)

In 1963, and in Charleston, W. Va. was published the great rural sounding duet (male/female) of « I’m Rough Stuff » (a Bill Carlisle song) by the Davis Twins – as they were called – also named HONEY & SONNY on their own H&S label (# 7069). Great lead guitar and infectious bass rhythm.

Charlie Huff (& Bobby Kent)

In Oklahoma City CHARLIE HUFF (and Bobby Kent) did cut in 1959 or early ’60s an uptempo, mid-paced « Can’t Tame Wild Women » : a joyful song over good guitar and electric bass (# 726). Huff had a long string of releases, from 1957 , on his own Huff label.

In Oklahoma City CHARLIE HUFF (and Bobby Kent) did cut in 1959 or early ’60s an uptempo, mid-paced « Can’t Tame Wild Women » : a joyful song over good guitar and electric bass (# 726). Huff had a long string of releases, from 1957 , on his own Huff label.

Bennie Hess

Even more prolific than Huff was Texan BENNIE HESS. Was chosen from his abundant production a 1965 record, « Trucker’s Blues » : fine backing (guitar and steel) and infectious rhythm issued on Musicode 5691. Other Hess labels which he issued on were Opera, Jet, Space/Spade, Popularity, Showland among others, that is without mentioning aliases and pseudonyms. Maybe Hess will have his story on in boppin.org someday.

Frank Hunter & the Black Mountain Boys

Finally in Tennessee by the Sarasota, Fl. originating FRANK HUNTER & His Back Mountain Boys, both sides (# 1049) of a Rich-R’-Tone label do « Tennessee Boy », a really fine and fast Bluegrass bopper (banjo and fiddle led), and « Little Boy Blue », a mid-paced bopper.

Sources : 78worlds (45-cat) for many a scan, YouTube (Honey & Sonny)(Bill Hicks)(Wade Ray), HBR-28 for Frank Hunter.

Early November 2017 bopping and wailing fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks. After being one long month away [for a thermal cure – everyone has to coddle himself, no?], finally I got back home. And I hope you are waiting for this early November bopping (and Rocking) fortnight’s favorites selection. Let’s not deceive any of you.

 

Up in Michigan, CAL DAVIS & his Tennessee Kings on the full of good music label Fortune (# 185) gives us a lovely uptempo (nimble lead guitar which has 2 soli ; good steel which has its solo too) « Partnership love affair » from 1956. I’d like to hear more by him..

Partnership love affairfortune Davis  Partnership

download

« Don’t go back again » is the next song, and a shuffler from 1959 by GEORGE KENT, cut in Dallas, TX.  issued on Maverick 1001. The duet vocals are a bit poppish at times, but are backed by two solos of steel and fiddle + loud drums. Flipside « Move on » is a fine uptempo too (hear it on YouTube). Kent went later to do mainstream country on Mercury in the ’70’s.

maverick Kent again

Don’t go back again

download

Really early (1948) let’s take care of JACK HOLDEN & the Georgia Boys on the famous Red Barn (associated to White Church for the jack holden & ga. boyssacred sides) label from Kansas City, which had also in its roster Jimmie Skinner (his first sides), Byron Parker and the Blackwood Bros. Holden made a serie of records containing all « Mama ». Here we hear to « Mama quit teasin’ me » (# 1151) and « Mama I’m sick » (# 1152). Fine shufflers, containing choruses in unison. The fiddle well to the fore is played by Wayne Midkiff. After that Holden also cut 6 discs for RCA (1951-52) then disappeared completely. During those years (1948-52) Holden had radio shows on WEAS (Decatur, Georgia), WATL (Atlanta, Georgia too); he was also associated to the Renfro Valley Barn Dance (in Kentucky or Ohio), and was heard on two Kansas radio stations: WIBW (Kansas Roundup) and WIBW (Topeka).

Mama quit teasin’ mered barn Holden teasin'redbarn Holden sick

download
Mama I’m sick

download

A woman now, Mz. KITTY KAYE & the Cats from Cleveland, OH. on the Hawk label (# 72053) from 1953. « Fishtruck boogie » is a R&B belter with handclaps and a solid brass section, aided by a good piano.

hawk Kaye Fishtruck

Fishtruck boogie

download

Back to bopping music with a Roswell, New Mexico Mystic label (# 5828) : RICKY McKINNEY do offer a sort of happy bluesy uptempo with « Washday blues », which reminds me other domestic affairs like « Super market day » by Jimmy Key (Hi Lite). Anyway McKinney may have some sort of connexion with Norman Petty, as his record is registered by Nor-Va-Jak music.mystc McKinney Washday

Washday blues

download

The next two tracks were cut in 1962 and RCA custom recordings. Until that, nothing is really interesting. But wait a bit: both sides are hillbilly gospel. And another teasing detail: side A has a Columbus, OH. location, while side B is out of Delberton, W. Va. It’s the kind of details which bring more appeal to a record, moreover very nice sacred harmony vocals (spare instrumentation, only guitar). Oh yes, the artist is called LLOYD FARLEY & His Revelators, on The Revelators label, no #. « How long » is the faster of both, although the mid-paced tempo « The Lord will make a way » is equally good.

How long

download
The Lord will make a way

download

the revelators Farley  longthe revelators Farley Lord

From Texas (Houston area, I guess) comes PAUL WILSON who performs «The blues you gave me » on Picture 1001. This record is typical, although having been issued in ’59, of ’60s Nashville Country : good vocal (but nothing exceptional), steel as the driving force of the track, then drums and piano. Wilson had another later on the Country Town label (# 105) and «Hippie invasion”.

The blues you gave me

downloadpicture Wilson blues

They turned the lights out down at Joe’stomBg Bee Mills ights

download

Final cut by HOUSTON [Bob] MILLS: the moving ballad « They turned the lights out down at Joe’s » from 1966 on the Tom Big Bee label # 101 (I remember this label is from Pontotoc, North of Mississipi.). It released also Robert Mills (obviously the same artist) on # 101 (reverse by Deborah Aycock – wonder if she is related to Earl, whose ground was rather Houston area, if one excepts his Dixie recordings – cut in Gallatin, TN.?). Another interesting figure on Tom Big Bee (# 102) was the Sun wild man Jimmy Wages (& Tune Masters), who does anyway very average Country music here (# Tom Big Bee 102). Lastly James Mask (Tom Big Bee 111) does a good version of Rocky Bill FordBeer drinking blues“.

That’s it, folks. As usual, comments, additions, corrections are welcome. Bopping.org is en route for a re-organization within the very next months : it would give more fun for you visitors to run through the 300++ articles. More on that in a near future.

Sources : Hillbilly Researcher (Red Barn and Jack Holden) + Praguefrank huge discography ; many YouTube shots, too numerous to recommend any of the generous uploaders. 45Cat was very useful. Then, many, many researches, mostly out of my own archives, to build something of interest around each artist mentioned. I hope you like the feature. In the meantime, bye-bye..

Late January 2017 bopping hillbilly and rockabilly fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! This is the second 2017 fortnight, that of late January. It will cover very various styles, be it hillbilly boppers, country rockers or rockabillies, even one Bluegrass bopper, from 1955 to 1961.

First an uptempo atmospheric bluesy rockabilly from Bald Knob, AR, on the CKM label (# 1000) by BUDDY PHILLIPS with Rocking Ramblers, « River boat blues » from 1956 (valued at $ 100-125). I enclose for comparison the original version of the song by ALTON GUYON and his Boogie Blues Boys on the Judsonia, AR. Arkansas label (# 553), a Starday custom from 1956. This time the song is taken at a slow, lazy, bluesy pace – fine fiddle (valued at $ 150-200). Back to Buddy Phillips for the CKM flipside « Coffee baby » (written by Alton Guyon), less fast than the « River boat blues » side, but good and bluesy. Pity that Phillips disappeared afterwards.

ckm phillips-bluesckm phillips-coffeearkansas -guyon-blues

Buddy Phillips, “River boat blues

download
Buddy Phillips, “Coffee baby

download
Alton GuyonRiver boat blues

download
Memphian EDDIE BOND (1933-2013) had many strings to his bow : band leader, D.J., radio station manager, night club owner, chief police and editor of an entertainment newpaper (pheww..). Here are his first sides on the Ekko label (# 1015) cut July 1955 in Nashville with Hank Garland on lead guitar and Jerry Byrd on steel. « Talking of the wall » and « Double duty lovin’ » (written by Vernon Claud, later on Decca with « Baby’s gone ») are uptempo Rockabilly/Boppers, very ordinary, which of course went nowhere. They are valued $ 100-150. Later in 1956, Bond recorded a famous string of classic Rockabilly releases on the Mercury label, « Rockin’ daddy » (# 70826) (the original being cut late ’55 by Sonny Fisher – Starday 179) is the most well-known.

Talking off the wall

download
Double duty lovin‘”

download

ekko bond-talking

ekko bond doubleTwo issues on the Starday associated Dixie label from the late Fifties to the early Sixties. ELMER BRYANT on Dixie 906 from 1960 (value $ 75-100) delivers the cheerful bopper « Gertie’s carter broke », which has a Louisiana bouquet, with fine fiddle and steel. The medium-paced flipside « Will I be ashamed tomorrow », although very good and sincere, is more conventional country.

Gertie’s Carter broke

download
Will I be ashamed tomorrow

download

The other Dixie discussed is Dixie 1170 from 1961 by LITTLE CHUCK DANIELS : « I’ve got my brand on you » is a bit J. Cash-styled, an uptempo bass chords guitar opus with good effect on voice : honest Country rocker. I add by Daniels his issue on Dixie 1153, « Night shift », same style.

I’ve got my brand on you

download
Night shift

download

dixie bryant-gertiesdixie bryant ashameddixie daniel-branddixie daniels night

 

 

 

 

 

A plaintive Hillbilly now by BILL STUCKER vocal – Tune Twisters on the Indiana Ruby label (# 430) , « I go on pretending » from 1956 : a nice discreet guitar, some snare drums.

I go on pretending

download
ruby stucker-pretending

ROLLIE WEBBER from California was a part of the now well-known Bakersfield sound, and had issues on Pep and Virgelle among other labels. Here he offers « Painting the town » on the Tally label (#150), a fine bopper with prominent steel ( sounds like Ralph Mooney).

tally -webber-painting
Painting the town

download
Finally from Detroit on Fortune 187 from 1957 : BUSTER TUNER & his Pinnacle Mt. Boys for « That old heartbreak express ». It’s a bluegrass bopper, Turner is in fine voice, and mandolin to the fore.

That old heartbreak express

pinnacle-mountain-boys (buster turner)

Buster Turner on dobro

download
fortune -turner express
That’s it, folks !

Sources : YouTube (Dixie issues) ; my own researches ; RCS for Eddie Bond ; Malcolm Chapman’s blogsite (« Starday customs ») for Alton Guyon.