Early December 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks ! This is the latest batch of bopping goodies – and the penultimate 2019 selection. You will have to be comprehensive with label scans, that don’t match the usual bopping.org criteria : as a matter of fact I am experiencing the latest Photoshop version and not completely familiar with it. Anyway the music is still intact and ready for listening/downloading. So let’s go.

Ted Daffan’s Texans

TED DAFFAN (1912-1996) was a bandleader and prolific songwriter (and steel guitar player) since the mid-30s. Backed by his Texans, he wrote many hits and classics: just one among others, the abundantly revised later « Born To Lose » from 1941. Here he is with « Car Hop Blues », orginally published on Okeh 6452, then reissued in June 1947 on Columbia 37438 then 20165 : a fine shuffler, indeed adorned by Daffan’s steel, plus accordion and a bluesy guiar. The vocal is done by the disillusioned Chuck Keeshan. A short note : Daffan had his own label in ’55-’58, which released fine records by Jerry Irby « Clickety Clack »), Jerry Jericho (« These Hands »), Fidlo (« Triflin’ Heart ») or William Penix « Dig That Crazy Driver » .

Jimmie Ballard

As vocalist for Buffalo Johnson & His Herd on Kentucky 520 (1950, Cincinnati), JIMMIE BALLARD cut the two risqué « Tappin’ Boogie » and « T’ain’t Big Enough ». Great boppers, the fastest being the A-side – great walking bass for a combination of guitar and steel over a non-sense vocal. The B-side is slowier, although equally good.

Billboard Sept. 27th, 1952

Billboard, Dec. 20th, 1952

This time two years later on King, as JIMMY BALLARD, he once more had very fine records. The double-sided « I Want A Bow-Legged Woman » and « Shes Got Something » are both superior boppers, drums present – actually pre-rockabilly tunes. Nice steel and vocally fluent.(King 1118). His later amusing « The Creek’s Gone Muddy (And The Fish Won’t Bite ») (# 1143) is done in a similar style. The agile guitar player in these sides could be the great Al Myers, who adorned several days before a Bob Newman session (« Phht ! You Were Gone »).

Adam Colwell, Tex White & the Country Cousins

Less and less known are both next artists. ADAM COLWELL is delivering in 1962 (Cincinnati) the fast « Open the Door » (some chorus, but great steel) on Ark 219, while TEX WHITE — is doing a medium nice uptempo on Nayco 2526 (location and date unknown – do you have any clue, Drunken Hobo?) with « You’re Wasting Your Tears ».

“Little Willie” Littlefield

Finally we got fabulous piano walking basses and tremendous high-pitched notes by LITTLE WILLIE LITTLEFIELD : his first record from 1948 on Houston’s Eddie’s 1202, « Little Willie’s Boogie » is very reminiscent of Amos Milburn great Aladdin wildies like « My Baby’s boogeing » or « Amo’s Boogie » ; Littlefield’s « Jim Wilson Boogie » on Federal 12221 is done in the same style.

Sources : HBR « Kentucky label » ; Will Agenant « Columbia 20000 serie » for Ted Daffan ; King Hillbilly Project (Jimmy Ballard) ; Gripsweat (Tex White, Adam Colwell) ; my own archives.

early October 2014 fortnight favorites: a short survey of King records

 

King Records was a very important label run by Syd Nathan in Cincinnati, Oh. It had a C&W serie (500-1500), a Federal serie (10000) and a Deluxe serie (2000 or 5000).

 

First artist is Cowboy Jack Derrick, whose story is on the site. « Truck drivin’ man » is a very early trucker gay song.(King 633)

king  derrik truck
Cowboy Jack Derrick, “Truck drivin’ man

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Paul Howard from Arkansas (1908-1994) was leading his Cotton Pickers on a long string of releases on Columbia and King. He was a resident at WSM in Nashville. « The boogie’s fine tonight » and « Texas boogie » are two of his best sides.

king  Howard texas

king  howard tonight

Paul HowardTexas boogie

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Paul HowardThe boogie’s fine tonight

Clyde Moody is also well represented with a personal entry in bopping.org. Here is presented one of his best platters, « The blues came pouring down », with very strong rhythm guitar. (# 943)

 

Clyde MoodyThe blues came pouring down

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king moody Blues

 

Ocie Stockard is the most Western swing styled artist of the selection. The instrumental »Cow town boogie » evokes Texas and Oklahoma (King 634)
Ocie StockardCow town boogie

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king  stokard cow
Jimmie Thomason was a West coast D.J. and had a string of releases on King of the same high standard. « I’ll drown in my tears » is a true Country blues, that is not often heard.(King 1132)
king thomason drown
Jimmy ThomasonI’ll down in my tears

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Ramblin’ Tommy Scott had a career covering from the 40s until the 90s. He is presented here on Federal 10026 with « Uncle Sammy », usual style.

federal  Scott Sammy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tommy ScottUncle Sammy

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Finally a R&B Rocker by Big John Greer on the « regular » serie : « Come back uncle John », apparently based on « Long tall Sally » from early 1956.
king greer  John

Big John GreerCome back uncle John

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Cowboy Jack Derrick, “Truck Drivin’ Man” (Texas, also Louisiana, 1946-1957)

We don’t know anything about Jack Derrick’s early life. He seems to have emanated from Texas in 1921, and he began recording as early as 1946 in a sparse honky tonk (mainly guitars) instrumentation for King. This label did issue on both main serie as well as on Deluxe and Federal the result of 12 songs two sessions. Best tunes are one « Truck Drivin’ Man » , « Got Worried Blues In My Mind », “I Want A Woman (That Can Cook)”  or « Triflin’ Baby ». I don’t know if any tune did meet the success, although « Truck Drivin’ Man » remains as a minor classic : it even has been re-recorded in the early ’60s on a « trucker » LP (# 866 “Truck Drivers Songs”). Another curiosity is the line in the song: “

“When my truck drivin’ man comes into town

 

I’ll dress up in my silken gown”

So Derrick was ahead of his time with a gay trucker song.

 

jack derrick picture1

king derrick truckdeluxe derrick worriedking derrick triflin'Later on we find Derrick on a solitary Majestic issue of 1950-51. Why he appeared on this West coast label is unknown. « Can’t Find The Keyhole » is of course a drunken song.

Derrick also had issues on the Clifton and Eagle labels (untraced) during the early 50s. 

 

billboard king derrick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cowboy jack leaflet

majestic derrick cincinnatiBack in 1955, Cowboy Jack Derrick was working at KNUZ in Houston, Texas. He hosted a show called the “KNUZ Corral” each day from 11:00am to 1:25pm, Monday through Saturday.??On Saturday night, he would sing and do comedy as well as part of the KNUZ Saturday Night Jamboree. To finish off his weekends of personal appearances, he performed at the Magnolia Gardens on Sundays where they did outdoor shows.??In late 1954, Biff Collie and Jack wrote Martha Ferguson of Pickin’ and Singin’ News that they had a ‘homecoming’ type of show lined up for their Christmas Jamboree show over KNUZ. Texas Bill Strength and Arlie Duff were to make appearances.??In May of 1955, we note that Jack wrote a letter of encouragement to the new publication, Country & Western Jamboree to help disc jockeys like himself keep up on the news.??In the summer of 1955, Jack wrote one of those regional roundup columns and gave us some insight into the KNUZ Saturday Night Jamboree show. It was held at the City auditorium and broadcast every Saturday night from 8:00 pm to 11:00 pm. At that time, he told readers some of the members of their cast were Link Davis, Sonny Burns, Floyd Tillman, and, Burt and Charley. The show would also include guest appearances by other acts who were probably making appearances in the area and included such names as Red Foley, Tex Ritter, Eddie Dean, T. Texas Tyler, Tommy Collins and Jimmie Davis. He also told readers of another Jamboree show that he had learned about when he visited with the show’s organizer, Hank Jones over in Hammond, Louisiana. That show, The Southeastern Jamboree was held on Saturday nights at the Reimers Auditorium in Hammond.??

Finally he had two interesting boppers in 1955-57. One is on Starday (# 205) , « Waitin’ and Watchin’ », which is fine. Even better is the very first Longhorn issue « Black Mail », full of energy and happiness (# 501). After that Derrick disappears at least from the recording scene : only one more picture shows him in 1960 with Hal Harris.

 

Note. Drunken Hobo pointed out the two versions of “Truck Driving Man”, which had escaped me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

credits: Allan Turner for Federal and True-Tone (South Africa pressing) scans. Hillbilly Researcher for Majestic issue. “HillbillyBoogie1” (You tube) for the mid-50s bio details.Various sources (also own collection) for the rest. Comments welcome!

longhorn derrick mailstarday derrick waitin'

derrick car picturederrick magnolia picture

federal derrick memories

trutone derrick boy