Early October 2021 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night

by Hardrock Gunter

The veteran HARDROCK GUNTER does provide us his « Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night » (Decca 46300) cut in 1950. A nice bopper, an happy song. Good guitar and vocal.

Next, JOHNNY RECTOR, singer fronting Blackie Crawford and the Western Cherokees, a Houston group, does « If They Ever Get Together » : a bopper – steel, piano and fiddle.

Dub Adams on stage (’40s)

The fine DUB ADAMS with an instrumental « Pocahutas Stomp » on the Dude label (Dude JB 1498) : steel, piano and drums. Western tinged.

From the South now, JOHNNY FOSTER does offer « Turn Me Loose » on Capa 233. A duet, jumping country song, shrill guitar and a good guitar solo.

DAVE BROCKMAN had a disk on Starday Custom, the great « Feel Sorry For Me ». Here he is on the Pea-nut label # 1001 with « My Angel’s Gone to Hell ». Surely a Southern label. He’s been on the Fayette label # 1002 too.

The King of Yodel American Singers, as they call him, KENNY ROBERTS in his finest hour (Coral 64032). Intro by harmonica, a nice bopper, fine lyrics. The song was issued too by Lonesome Willie Evans on London and Little Jimmy Dickens on Columbia.

1929-30 the Godfather of Country music JIMMIE RODGERS did two of his better-known tune, « Mean Mama Blues » (with brass acc.) and « Never No More Blues », (flipside to « Mule Skinner Blues »)both cut by Victor. Both of them were revived by AL RUNYON on the Kentucky label, respectively # 577 and 581. Slow songs, only acc. by guitar. Runyon closely copies here Rodgers.

LARRY GOOD on the Kansas City label R (« Our ») # 517 cut a good Rockabilly with « Pick Up Your Hammer » ; good guitar, the vocal is OK

Finally from Louisiana, the romping « Drunkard’s Two Step » by ROBERT BERTRAND. Steel and accordion backing. Fais DoDo # 1000 (a colloquial word for dance halls)

Sources : many ; YouTube for several(Johnny Foster, Dub Adams) ; the others from my own archives.

HAPPY FATS (Leroy LeBlanc) & his Rayne-Bo Ramblers: (1935-1952) and Oran “Doc” Guidry, Louisiana extraordinaires

It has proved difficult to find something on Happy Fats Leroy LeBlanc, although he has been a very popular figure in Louisiana during an half-century. Below is a biography published on the net by All Music (Jason Ankeny).happy fats pic Little did Gilbert and Carrie LeBlanc know, when their baby boy was born on January 30, 1915, that their cheerfully named child would become one of Louisiana’s most recognized Cajun musicians. The music of Happy Fats remains instrumental in both of the preservation and celebration of his native Cajun culture, despite the damage inflicted by a series of race-baiting protest records cut at the peak of the civil rights movement. Born Leroy LeBlanc in Rayne, Acadia Parish, LA, on January 30, 1915, Fats was a self-taught musician who began his professional career at 17 when he began playing accordion in Cajun hillbilly bands led by Amédé Breaux and Joe Falcon. In 1935, he formed his own group, the Rayne-Bo Ramblers, which starred the talents of Eric Arceneaux among others. And regularly headlined the local OST Club. Fats signed to RCA Victor in doc guidry & happy fats1936. In 1937, he played alongside Doc Guidry, and Uncle Ambrose Thibodeaux. Other associates were Luderin Darbonne, Pee Wee Broussard, Doc Guidry, “Papa Cairo” Lamperez, Rex Champagne, and Crawford J. Vincent. He was invited and spoke on many radio stations including: KANE, KEUN, KUOH, KROF, and others. In 1940 he scored his first significant hit, “La Veuve de la Coulee” which featured then-unknown fiddler Harry Choates. The Rayne-Bo Ramblers also served as a springboard for Cajun accordion legend Nathan Abshire in 1935 (“La valse de Riceville“). Other popular Fats recordings include the traditional “Allons dance Colinda,” “La Vieux de Accordion,” and “Mon Bon Vieux Mari.” Few of his efforts earned national attention, but within south Louisiana he was a superstar, and in the early ’50s even hosted a weekday morning radio show on Lafayette station KVOL. In 1966, however, Fats was the subject of national controversy when he signed to producer Jay D. Miller’s segregationist Reb Rebel label to record the underground smash “Dear Mr. President,” a spoken word condemnation of Lyndon Johnson’s civil rights policies that sold over 200,000 copies despite its appalling racism. “We didn’t have any problems with that, not at all,” Fats maintained in an interview. “There wasn’t anything violent about it — it was just a joke. I had a car of black people run me down on the highway one time coming in Lafayette, and they said, ‘Are you the fellow that made ” Dear Mr. President”?’ I said I was, and they said, ‘We’d like to buy some records.’ They bought about 15 records. There was a big van full of black people and they loved it . . . Either side at that time, they didn’t want integration very much. They wanted to go each their own way.” The commercial success of “Dear Mr. President” launched a series of similarly poisonous Fats efforts including “Birthday Thank You (Tommy from Viet Nam),” “A Victim of the Big Mess (Called the Great Society),” “The Story of the Po’ Folks and the New Dealers,” and “Vote Wallace » in ’72.” After a long battle with diabetes, Fats died on February 23, 1988.   (more…)