Late December 2018 bopping fortnight’s favorites (1947 to 1966)

Howdy folks ! This is the last selection for the last December 2018 fortnight of bopping favorites. There is no actual link between the tracks, maybe a tenuous (banjo present) between two songs. Rest is otherwise very varied, from 1947 to 1966.

First artist is a duet of two siblings: the WOODWARD BROTHERS, from the Boston, MA area. They cut in 1954 the uptempo Hillbilly « Cuttin’ Paper Heart » on Sheraton 1001.

Their leader was Mick Woodward, whose « Hot Rod Race Navy Style » is very good styled Hot Rod song.

They were part of the W.C.O.P. Hayloft Jamboree, which also starred Jack Clement, future Sun’s A&R man and artist in his own right.

From Cincinnati, OH, a female Rockabilly, LAUNA GUNTER with Queen City Ramblers: they do « He’s My Man » (Excellent 807, from 1958) : a sugary voice over a solid backing (guitar and romping/hopping piano).

LYNN CRAYMER & Blue Sky Ramblers, from Florida, do come next with a dramatic, atmosheric Rockabilly, »Wild She Devil » : fiddle to the fore, Blue Sky 109, located in St.Clair, Florida.

« Banjo Boogie » (Modern 534) was an unusual instrumental tune in the repertoire of the LONE STAR PLAYBOYS, cut in 1947 by this legendary combo.

Based in Waco, Texas, Lone Star Playboys were a popular country touring band in Central Texas from 1937 to the 1950s. Members of the group included vocalist Hamlet Booker and his brother Morris Booker on mandolin,

Vince Incardona on banjo, fiddler Cotton Collins, bassist Pee Wee Truehitt. They were long associated to Bob Wills.

From Louisiana, young DOUG STANFORD released, after his famous two-sider « Sadie/Won’t you tell me » on D (1957, issued in Fortnight August 2016, or February 2014), a very nice another double-sider on Carma Records (# 514) « Can You Explain/The Way You Used To Be » :

jumping Country-rocker and a Rockaballad issued circa 1960. Two pleasant songs. Another 45 by Stanford has until now escaped my researches : on the Bofuz 1108 label, «Same Old Crazy Me ».

Second artist to border Bluegrass is the veteran banjo player BILL CLIFTON, backed by his Mountain Boys, for « Lonely Heart Blues » (Mercury 71200, September 1957).

WHITEY KNIGHT (1920-1977), already posted in a past Fortnight’s favorites (November 2017). Here he claims to the fine, heartbroken song

« Another Brew, Bartender » released on Sage & Sand 205 in California. Good fiddle.

Here is JIM BOYD & His Men Of The West, for a romping « Boogie Woogie Square Dance ».( RCA 20-4263, released September 1951). Boyd had previously cut the very first version of « Dear John ». See the story behind this song in the article devoted to Aubrey Gass. Note this « Boogie Woogie » was penned by the prolific Billy Hughes, an artist in his own right.

On the Evana label (# 0001) in 1966 one can finally hear WAYNE SATKAMP & the Five Aces and the minimalist backing (fiddle to the fore) «Barber Hair Blues». A good bopper for this era.

Sources : more than one YouTube posts ; 45-world for Jim Boyd and Lone Star Playboys label scans; Gripsweat for Doug Stanford on Carma, among others ; Rocky-52 for the Lone Star Playboys info ; Aradillo Killer for Bill Clifton music and label scan ; 45 Ohio River for Launa Gunter; thanks Dean C. Morris for two corrections.

late June 2013 fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks! Let’s begin in Ohio with a native (Portsmouth, 1919), HOWARD PERKINS, early in 1960 on the Shawnee label (# 102) for the fine fast, energetic “It’s A Cryin’ Shame” – nice rhythm, welcome short guitar & steel solos. Shawnee 101 was Lucky Boggs‘ “Drillin’ Rig Boogie“. Later in 1964, “It’s A Cryin’ Shame” reappeared (re-recorded with a lovely fiddle well to the fore – long guitar solo) on Bob Mooney’s Rem (# 346) Lexington, Ky. label. Finally PERKINS had another goodie with “Under control” on the Indianapolis Juke label (# 2012, 1969).

howard perkins

shawnee perkins cryin'

juke perkins control

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rem perkins cryin'

Now a real stomper perfectly sung and played: that’s how a real honky tonk should sound in 1956. WYNN STEWART, fronting the Skeets McDonald Orchestra with the solid “Slowly But Surely” (Capitol 3515).

capitol stewart slowly

Very near to Rock’n’Roll, the Rockabilly tinged “I won’t be able to make it” by GLENN CANYON on the Cincinnati Adco label (# 781) from 1965. Stinging guitar, haunting riff.

Back to early ’50s with JACKIE DOLL and the topical “When They Drop The Atomic Bomb“. A fast classic honky tonk: piano, guirar, steel, even a landolin solo. It’s on the Mercury label # 6322 (1952)

Now an excellent fast atmospheric Hillbilly Rockaballad “Courtin’ Under The Moon” by RONDELL BARKER (Excellent 804). Great steel & guitar.

Finally on Philly’s Arcade 163, “It’s Nobody’s Fault But Your Own” by REX ZARIO. A medium steady rhythm over a firm baritone vocal. Zario deserves to be researched.

adco canyon ablemercury doll bomb

excellent barker courtin'arcade zario faultP.S. Thanks Drunken Hobo for sending me the second version (Rem) of Howard Perkins’ “It’s A Cryin’ Shame”.

early March 2013 fortnight’s favourites

Hello folks ! Hi to returners, welcome to newcomers…

This is my bi-monthly choice of stomping, shuffling hillbilly boppers, sometimes rockers, and by surprise, R&B rockers.

Let’s begin on the West Coast, but I am not sure, as the Sage label used to sweep products largely from other areas along: the gentle rocker « Seven Come Eleven » by Al Muniz (# 262). It seem date from 1958. A prominent piano, a bit jazzy guitar solo. All this transpires laziness !

sage muniz seven

excellent whittaker tappin'

 

 

 

Then in Ohio, (Cincinnati) by Miss Joy Whittaker. She seems to have been a good seller, as she has records as soon as 1955 on M and J, and Esta in 1957. Excellent 215 is a label owned by Mrs. Estel Scarborough as the others. Dating this record « Toe Tappin Rhythm » has proven difficult : the only other I know is # 279 (Logan Valley Boys) from May 1957. So I’d assume this one as being from late ’55/early ’56. As from the bass beginning instro, we have a a mix of hillbilly bop (fiddle has its solo) and a rock-a-billy guitar. Exciting firm voice and many breaks. Could please to Rockabilly fans.

 

 

 

Down to Texas with the Corpus Christi DJ Kenny Everett, who does a fine country-rocker (1958) on All Star 7173 with « What Is It ». Accompaniment is a typical Houston one : fiddle (solo), steel (2 solos), piano (solo) and drums.

Marshall Lail then from Atlanta, Georgia for two tracks. On Sunrise first (# 001) for the energic late ’50s complaint « I need You So » (More Than You Know), before a more melodic and sentimental «Countless Hours Of Heartaches », podcasted by a certain « Mr. Honky Tonk » on his channel. No indication of the label. Finally way up North, in Hammond, Indiana, for the great bluegrassstune on the Mar-Vel 355 label by the Thomas Brothers, Melvin and Elvin, “Way  High , Way Low“. Great interplay between the three voices (falsetto and barytone). A classic !

Billboard 17 Nov. 58

all-star everett what

sunrise lail need

mar-vel' thomas bros. Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

billboard 5-8-56 thomas

Billboard 8 Aug. 56

 

March 28th, 2013. Dan Nail wrote the following line: “Marshall Lail was my Father. He recorded “I Need You So” and “Countless Hours of Heartache” in 1960 at NRCO Studios in Avondale, Georgia. He printed up 500 copies on his own label called Sunrise Records.”