Late November 2014 fortnight’s favorites

This time, very various records. SLIM DOSSEY hailed from Kentucky, but settled in Kirkland, Washington, late ’40s, where he had his own TV show. He was at one time a member of Smokey Rogers Western Caravan. Here you will find his Tubb (Ernest?) penned “Don’t stand just there“. on the JR (Seattle) label. Romping music!
Slim DosseyDon’t just stand there“. [March 23, 2018. I add Dossey’s version of Hank Williams’ “Ramblin’ Man“, issued Jan. 1954 on Ace-Hi Hits 5011. Good version!]

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ace-hi dossey ramblin'

“Ramblin’ Man”

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JR dossey stand

From Ohio, and in 1965, RALPH BUSH and the Brushwackers. He had one 4-track session for C-Flat (distributed by RCA), and three tracks are offered there. All fine Hillbilly boppers. “I’ve got the bluest feeling” (8543), “Troubles” (8544) and “My eyes don’t cry” (8545).
c flat  bush roublesc flat  Bush feeling Ralph BushI’ve got the bluest feeling

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Ralph BushTroubles

download Ralph BushMy eyes don’t cry

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From Washington state does come FRANK OLE’SHAY (real name Oleachea). With his brother Ernie, they had 12 issues on Four Star Blue Mountain OP- customs. Here are his best sides,”Love , love, love me, honey do” and “My baby’s not here in town tonight” (# 293) from 1958. Fine hillbilly rockers.
bluemountain)  ole'shay love
Frank Ole’shayLove, love, love me, honey do

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Frank Ole’ShayMy baby’s not here in town tonight

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From Texas, COTTON THOMPSON (“Jelly roll blues“) on Houston’s Freedom 1010. Thompson also had the great “How long” on Gold Star.
Cotton ThompsonJelly roll blues

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Jim FullenI’ve gone crazy

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Finally JIM FULLEN on the Deluxe label # 2015 and “I’ve gone crazy” from 1954. Fullen later recorded as Jimmie John,”Rosie’s back again” on Dot.
 It is not at all sure he’s the same Jimmie John who had “Solid rock” in 1958 on the Newark, Ohio, ZZ label.deluxe  fullen  crazy

HAPPY FATS (Leroy LeBlanc) & his Rayne-Bo Ramblers: (1935-1952) and Oran “Doc” Guidry, Louisiana extraordinaires

It has proved difficult to find something on Happy Fats Leroy LeBlanc, although he has been a very popular figure in Louisiana during an half-century. Below is a biography published on the net by All Music (Jason Ankeny).happy fats pic Little did Gilbert and Carrie LeBlanc know, when their baby boy was born on January 30, 1915, that their cheerfully named child would become one of Louisiana’s most recognized Cajun musicians. The music of Happy Fats remains instrumental in both of the preservation and celebration of his native Cajun culture, despite the damage inflicted by a series of race-baiting protest records cut at the peak of the civil rights movement. Born Leroy LeBlanc in Rayne, Acadia Parish, LA, on January 30, 1915, Fats was a self-taught musician who began his professional career at 17 when he began playing accordion in Cajun hillbilly bands led by Amédé Breaux and Joe Falcon. In 1935, he formed his own group, the Rayne-Bo Ramblers, which starred the talents of Eric Arceneaux among others. And regularly headlined the local OST Club. Fats signed to RCA Victor in doc guidry & happy fats1936. In 1937, he played alongside Doc Guidry, and Uncle Ambrose Thibodeaux. Other associates were Luderin Darbonne, Pee Wee Broussard, Doc Guidry, “Papa Cairo” Lamperez, Rex Champagne, and Crawford J. Vincent. He was invited and spoke on many radio stations including: KANE, KEUN, KUOH, KROF, and others. In 1940 he scored his first significant hit, “La Veuve de la Coulee” which featured then-unknown fiddler Harry Choates. The Rayne-Bo Ramblers also served as a springboard for Cajun accordion legend Nathan Abshire in 1935 (“La valse de Riceville“). Other popular Fats recordings include the traditional “Allons dance Colinda,” “La Vieux de Accordion,” and “Mon Bon Vieux Mari.” Few of his efforts earned national attention, but within south Louisiana he was a superstar, and in the early ’50s even hosted a weekday morning radio show on Lafayette station KVOL. In 1966, however, Fats was the subject of national controversy when he signed to producer Jay D. Miller’s segregationist Reb Rebel label to record the underground smash “Dear Mr. President,” a spoken word condemnation of Lyndon Johnson’s civil rights policies that sold over 200,000 copies despite its appalling racism. “We didn’t have any problems with that, not at all,” Fats maintained in an interview. “There wasn’t anything violent about it — it was just a joke. I had a car of black people run me down on the highway one time coming in Lafayette, and they said, ‘Are you the fellow that made ” Dear Mr. President”?’ I said I was, and they said, ‘We’d like to buy some records.’ They bought about 15 records. There was a big van full of black people and they loved it . . . Either side at that time, they didn’t want integration very much. They wanted to go each their own way.” The commercial success of “Dear Mr. President” launched a series of similarly poisonous Fats efforts including “Birthday Thank You (Tommy from Viet Nam),” “A Victim of the Big Mess (Called the Great Society),” “The Story of the Po’ Folks and the New Dealers,” and “Vote Wallace » in ’72.” After a long battle with diabetes, Fats died on February 23, 1988.   (more…)

Cowboy Jack Derrick, “Truck Drivin’ Man” (Texas, also Louisiana, 1946-1957)

We don’t know anything about Jack Derrick’s early life. He seems to have emanated from Texas in 1921, and he began recording as early as 1946 in a sparse honky tonk (mainly guitars) instrumentation for King. This label did issue on both main serie as well as on Deluxe and Federal the result of 12 songs two sessions. Best tunes are one « Truck Drivin’ Man » , « Got Worried Blues In My Mind », “I Want A Woman (That Can Cook)”  or « Triflin’ Baby ». I don’t know if any tune did meet the success, although « Truck Drivin’ Man » remains as a minor classic : it even has been re-recorded in the early ’60s on a « trucker » LP (# 866 “Truck Drivers Songs”). Another curiosity is the line in the song: “

“When my truck drivin’ man comes into town

 

I’ll dress up in my silken gown”

So Derrick was ahead of his time with a gay trucker song.

 

jack derrick picture1

king derrick truckdeluxe derrick worriedking derrick triflin'Later on we find Derrick on a solitary Majestic issue of 1950-51. Why he appeared on this West coast label is unknown. « Can’t Find The Keyhole » is of course a drunken song.

Derrick also had issues on the Clifton and Eagle labels (untraced) during the early 50s. 

 

billboard king derrick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cowboy jack leaflet

majestic derrick cincinnatiBack in 1955, Cowboy Jack Derrick was working at KNUZ in Houston, Texas. He hosted a show called the “KNUZ Corral” each day from 11:00am to 1:25pm, Monday through Saturday.??On Saturday night, he would sing and do comedy as well as part of the KNUZ Saturday Night Jamboree. To finish off his weekends of personal appearances, he performed at the Magnolia Gardens on Sundays where they did outdoor shows.??In late 1954, Biff Collie and Jack wrote Martha Ferguson of Pickin’ and Singin’ News that they had a ‘homecoming’ type of show lined up for their Christmas Jamboree show over KNUZ. Texas Bill Strength and Arlie Duff were to make appearances.??In May of 1955, we note that Jack wrote a letter of encouragement to the new publication, Country & Western Jamboree to help disc jockeys like himself keep up on the news.??In the summer of 1955, Jack wrote one of those regional roundup columns and gave us some insight into the KNUZ Saturday Night Jamboree show. It was held at the City auditorium and broadcast every Saturday night from 8:00 pm to 11:00 pm. At that time, he told readers some of the members of their cast were Link Davis, Sonny Burns, Floyd Tillman, and, Burt and Charley. The show would also include guest appearances by other acts who were probably making appearances in the area and included such names as Red Foley, Tex Ritter, Eddie Dean, T. Texas Tyler, Tommy Collins and Jimmie Davis. He also told readers of another Jamboree show that he had learned about when he visited with the show’s organizer, Hank Jones over in Hammond, Louisiana. That show, The Southeastern Jamboree was held on Saturday nights at the Reimers Auditorium in Hammond.??

Finally he had two interesting boppers in 1955-57. One is on Starday (# 205) , « Waitin’ and Watchin’ », which is fine. Even better is the very first Longhorn issue « Black Mail », full of energy and happiness (# 501). After that Derrick disappears at least from the recording scene : only one more picture shows him in 1960 with Hal Harris.

 Cash Box, Nov. 5, 1955

Note. Drunken Hobo pointed out the two versions of “Truck Driving Man”, which had escaped me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

credits: Allan Turner for Federal and True-Tone (South Africa pressing) scans. Hillbilly Researcher for Majestic issue. “HillbillyBoogie1” (You tube) for the mid-50s bio details.Various sources (also own collection) for the rest. Comments welcome!

longhorn derrick mailstarday derrick waitin'

derrick car picturederrick magnolia picture

federal derrick memories

trutone derrick boy

 

 

 

 

 

beginning of May 2009 fortnight

First we have a boogie by Dick Lewis (Imperial, Los Angeles, 1947) “Beale Street Boogie” – Is this about Memphis’ most famous alley? Let’s stay in Memphis with Ernie Chaffin for a strong Country-rock on Sun records, “Laughin’ and Jokin'” (Pee Wee Maddux on steel). Then to Nashville with Dick Stratton, a 1951 romper, “Fat Gal Boogie”(Nashboro label). From Florida comes Joe Asher “Photograph Of You” (DeLuxe label) – I dig interplay between fiddle and steel. Then on to Texas, Jimmy Heap’s “That’s That” (Imperial, 1949) energic & never reissued! We come to an end with the York Brothers and their “Monday Morning Blues”; Hope you enjoy, and post your comments if any…