Late November 2018 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hi ! This is the late November 2018 bopping fortnight’s favorites selection : I try to add regularly this section of bopping.org. Obscure artists and record labels, as better known ones, but the emphasis is done on lesser known tunes. They do represent anyhow my feeling for the Hillbilly Bop music between 1945 and 1965 (occasionnally I am sticking these time limits out).

First artist is DICK DYSON, whom I still doesn’t know anything about. I had posted a tune (« I Work In The Daytime, (She Works At Night) » in the early July 2018 faves’ selection, here is one more : « Warmed Over Coffee And Woke Up Kisses » is a fast song, a lot of steel and a very agile lead guitar. Vocal by Johnny Pearson. This was released in 1947 on Tri-State 103.

The November period is favourable to witches and haunted houses. JACK RIVERS on Coral 64072 cut in 1954 the classic half-sung tune of the genre with « Haunted House Boogie : piano, steel, and skeleton’s clinketings.

From Columbia, TN, came in 1960 the rousing « The Drifter », released on Maid 1000 by the Tennessee Drifters (with TOMMY MORELAND on vocal). Great trembling guitar over an high-pitched vocal. More of the same with « The Tennessee Blues » on the Columbus (located in…Columbia, TN, near Nashville) label # 1501. He released also the out-and-out rocker «  » in 1962 on Skoop 1054.

On the West coast, GENE O’QUIN delivers « I Specialize In Love » (Capitol 2578), cut in December 1954. A fast bopper, steel played by Speedy West and fiddle by Harold Hensley.

On the Houston based Shamrock label (no #) I am releasing RAY COATS (Collins and The Ranch Boys) for the fine « Texas Blues », from 1952 or 1953.

In West Monroe (La.)(near Shreveport) was cut the good « Just Me And The Jukebox » by the veteran BUZZ BUSBY on vocals and mandolin. A fast song, a banjo solo as expected on the small Jiffy label # 207.

Next artist was primarily a ballad singer. RUSTY McDONALD, a native of Lawton, Texas (1921-1979, aged only 57 years) worked with Bob Wills, the Callahan Brothers, Tex Ritter as guitarist or front singer. Here he appears on the 1951 released « Baby Sittin’ Boogie » (Intro 6035) : lazy vocal, shufflin’ and sympathetic rhythm. He scored big the same year with « Postage Due », a very styled uptempo tune.

The veteran TEX RITTER has an assured vocal and a dreamed backing behind him, that of Speedy West on steel, Merle Travis on guitar, Cliffie Stone on bass and Harold Hensley on fiddle for « Boogie Woogie Cowboy » (Capitol 928, from January 1950)

Sources : as usual, YouTube, Uncle Gil’s Rockin’ Archives, Internet.

Early March 2018 bopping fortnight’s favorites (1947-1952)

Hello folks. This blog was launched exactly 9 years ago. Already 438 articles later, and still alive and well ! Thanks for visiting. This is the early March 2018 fortnight’s favorites.

First an almost certainly late ’40s recording done in Nashville, « Hillbilly City, Nashville Tenn. » by ERNIE BENEDICT & his Range Riders (vocal: Roy West). It’s a fast moving tune – fiddle accompaniment and handclaps item. Full of energy. Issued even in Nederland on the Continental label # 8034!

Hillbill City, Nashville, Tenn.

downloadErnie Benedict "Hillbilly City, Nashville Tenn."

AL CLAUSER & The Oklahoma Outlaws for the next two tracks was not a newcomer. His career dates from the mid-30s. Here « Move it over Rover » (Dog House Blues) on the Bullet label # 720 from 1950 is an uptempo bopper. Half-spoken (vocal Norman Hart) upon a call-and-response format, indeed based on Hank Williams’ « Move it on over » (which was itself a revamp of an old traditional). The flipside « My sweet mama » is a medium shuffler with steel.


Move it Over Rover

 

 

 

 

Al Clauser & his Oklahoma Outlaws - "Move It Over Rover (Dog House Blues)"

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My sweet mamaAl Clauser &his Oklahoma Outlaws "My Sweet Mama"

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The remaining tracks of this fortnight are all by LLOYD WEAVER, another artist originally out of Texas (KTUL, Waco). His first record was “Virginia (of West Virginia)” on Blue Bonnet 110 from 1947: a very Western swing styled record. later on the Bullet stable, as « Cowboy Pal » Lloyd Weaver ( # 663). The recording was first issued on Dude 1600, in Dallas. « Kue-Tee-Kue » is an utempo in the Tex Williams style, on a banjo rhythm (solo) backed by a steel. The flipside « Too many tears » is a medium weeper, with an extrovert vocal – a trademark of Weaver – over a rinky-dink piano. Then on # 1607 a fine uptempo “Like the leaves (I fell for you)” backed with a romping, fast “My Honey Bee“. Note that both Dude and second Coral records were credited to ‘Loyd’ with just one ‘l’.

"Cowboy Pal" Lloyd Weaver "Too Many tears""Cowboy Pal" Lloyd Weaver "Kue-Te-Kue"Loyd Weaver "My Honey Bee"

Kue-te-kue

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Too many tears

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My honey bee

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Like the leaves (I fell for you)

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On Coral 64143 (issued November 1952) and two excellent boppers. Vocal is perfect hillbilly, and again that rinky-dink piano for « Steppin’ out and sneakin’ in ». Flipside is equally good, « One wheel draggin’ », a fast bopper – steel solo is inventive. This June 26th, 1952 recording session provided two more tracks:

Billboard November 15, 1952

Steppin’ out and sneakin’ in”Loyd Weaver, "Summer 1944"Loyd Weaver "Steppin' Out And Sneakin' In"

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Loyd Weaver "one Wheel Draggin'"One wheel draggin'”

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The second Coral offering (# 64155) has the fine bluesy medium « Woman trouble blues » with even some yodel à la Hank. Reverse side is « After my love has turned to hate », a good vocal medium fiddle led tune.

Woman trouble blues

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“After my love has turned to hate

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Loyd Weaver "Woman Trouble Blues"Loyd Weaver "After My Love Has Turned To Hate"
Sources : as usual 78rpm site ; YouTube for music, also Hillbilly Researcher archives for Coral sides ; « A shot in the dark » for Al Clauser details.

 

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Late July 2017 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello, people ! Let’s begin this new July 2017 fortnight’s favorites selection with EARL PETERSON (b. 1927, d. 1973), a well-known figure out of Michigan. Apart from an early issue on his own Nugget label in 1949, he cut two sessions for Columbia in 1955 ; one of the songs involved was « I ain’t gonna fall in love » (# 21467). Light vocal, bass guitar, piano, all these combine for a fine bopper written by Vernon Claud. Peterson’s story is to be found in this site, was published January 2016.

“I ain’t gonna fall in lovePeterson Earl "I ain't gonna fall in love"

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Next artist KENNY ROBERTS was an ubiquitous one : Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Pennsylvania, although he was born (1925- d. 2012) in Tennessee as George S. Kingsbury. His speciality was yodeling, and more than one of his songs showed this : « I was born to yodel », « She taught me to yodel » or « The Arizona yodeler ».

Hillbilly fever

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Roberts Kenny "Hillbilly fever"

The song I chose of him is the fine « Hillbilly fever », issued February 1950 on the Coral label (# 64032) : his puffed vocal comes to a good effect, and he yodels lovely, mentioning Hillbilly songs of the era. Main instruments are harmonica and fiddle.

Now two Rockabillies by DANIEL NIX on the Zion, IL N&R label (Starday custom) from 1959. « Compensation blues » (# 741) is a medium-paced opus ; strong vocal and guitar to the fore. The follow-up is « Unlucky man » (# 756), the fastest of both tracks.

Compensation bluesNix Daniel  "Compensation blues"Nix Daniel "Unlucky man"

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Unlucky man”

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On to Texas and Louisiana with RAY ROGERS, Western swing bandleader. His first selection comes from the 1950 Star Talent label (# 758B) : « Mississipi blues » is mid-paced and includes a muted trumpet and a fine steel. The second issue « How can you be so mean » is a fast bopper on the Delta label (# 2840) from an unknown year : chimes and trumpet are the main instruments.

Rogers Ray "Mississipi blues"Rogers Ray  "How can you be so mean"Mississipi blues

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How can you be so mean”

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Way up North in Indianapolis with BOB HILL & his Melody Boys on Nabor 105. « This old train (is leaving my blues behind )» is a fast Rockabilly from 1959, lot of echo and a prominent fiddle. The second issue, « Empty dreams and empty arms » (Nabor 114B) is a shuffler from 1961-62, which has a lot of nice steel, a loud bass and a prominent rhythm guitar. A good record for this era. The song was revamped by Eddie Hill, unknown label. (The muddy sound, I’m sorry, comes from an old Tom Sims cassette).

This old train”

downloadHill Bob  "This old train"Hill Bob  "Empty dreams and empty arms"
“Empty dreams and empty arms”

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Finally « Wild cherry » by LEROY WASHINGTON is a pure R&B rocker on the Excello label (# 2144) from 1958. Guitar Gable plays the lead guitar.“Wild cherry”

downoadWashington Leroy "Wild cherry"

Sources : UncleGil for Daniel Nix files ; YouTube for Kenny Roberts. Ole’ Tom Sims’ cassettes for Bob Hill.

The “Long Gone Daddy”, LOU GRAHAM (1951-1957)

 

Notes by Phillip J. Tricker to the Collectables CD 5335 « Long gone daddy »(1990)

The name LOU GRAHAM (rn Lewis Lyerly) is best known for his superb rocker ‘Wee Willie Brown » cut for Coral (# 61931) in late 1957, but Lou had been active in a recording studio as early as the beginning of 1951.

He was born on July 15th, 1929 in the tiny community of Woodleaf (pop. 300) in North Carolina. One of ten children, he soon showed an interest in music and after three years of wearing Navy Blue in the services he got into radio as a singer and DJ. He spent 18 months at WPWA in Chester , Pa. where he met Bill Haley and the Saddlemen : it’s quite probable that Haley helped Lou secure a contract with Gotham (hence, Gotham 416). The second batch of recordings are certainly backed by the Saddlemen. The labels of Gotham 433 were ordered on July 9th, 1952, and at this time Lou was working in TV at WDEL in Wilmington, Delaware and as a DJ with his « Roundup time » program at radio station WTNJ in Trenton, NJ. During the mid-to-late fifties he was busy on a schedule of appearances at nightclubs and hillbilly parks asnwell as TV and radio, and playing on the « Big Western Jamboree » in Camden, NJ.

Notes by Bill Millar & Rob Finnis for BF 15733 « That’ll flat git it » (Decca) (1994)

When LOU GRAHAM dipped into rock’n’roll with Willie Brown in November 1957, he was already 28 and a veteran of local radio in Chester, Pennsylvania whose most famous resident, Bill Haley, became his mentor. One of ten children Graham was born Lewis Lyerly in Woodleaf, North Carolina in 1929. After serving in the US Navy, he worked as a country vocalist and broadcaster joining WPW, Chester in 1950. It was there that he befriended with Bill Haley, then jobbing on the local bar-room circuit with the Saddlemen while holding down the post of announcer at the station.

Graham signed with Philadelphia’s Gotham label in 1951, and made his recording debut accompanied by members of Haley’s band with whom he occasionally appeared on stage. By the time of his second Gotham release, Graham had moved to WTNJ in Trenton, New Jersey leaving Haley to pursue the musical career which would soon make him an international star.

Who’s Lou Graham?

Slap that bass!

By 1956, Haley, flush with riches, had assumed the role of benefactor, granting recording favours to a number of acolytes in an ill-fated attempt to create a music publishing and recording empire. Graham was signed to Haley’s Clymax label and he cut « Wee Willie Brown » backed by the Comets. The master was assigned directly to Coral when Haley’s enterprizes ran into financial difficulties.


LOU GRAHAM, a track-by-track appreciation (notes by bopping.org editor)

« Two timin’ blues » is an uptempo shuffler. A bit of yodel vocal. A good steel. Backing by a fine piano (+ solo).      « Long gone daddy » is, of course, the Hank Williams’ song, and this is a good version. Morever I have the same comments than for « Two timin’ blues ». All in all, a successful 2-sider for a first recording (Gotham 416)

Two timin’ blues

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Long gone daddy

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Graham Lou  "Two timin' blues"Graham Lou  "Long gone daddy"

 

Now on to the 4-tracks second session. « I’m lonesome » has an inventive steel over an uptempo shuffle pace. The piano is well to the fore and Graham adopts a somewhat harsh vocal. « Please make up your fickle mind » is a nice shuffler too (Gotham 433, from 1953). « A sweet bunch of roses », as expected, is a sentimental, although agreeable song (Gotham 429). More of the same with the medium-paced « My heart tells me (I’m still in love with you) ».

I’m lonesome

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A Sweet bunch of roses

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Please make up your fickle mind

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My heart tells me

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Graham Lou "I'm Lonesome"

Graham Lou  "A sweet bunch of roses"Graham Lou  "Please make up your fickle mind"

 

 

 

 

 

Of course, the Coral sides Graham Lou  "My heart tells me"from 4 years later are a complete contrast with the Gotham sides. « Wee Willie Brown » (Coral 61931) is a solid rocker : Bill Haley’s saxman Rudy Pompilli blows his fuse, and Franny Beecher excells on lead guitar as on the Comets’ better days. « You were mean baby », although noted as recorded at the same session, is very different : big band type rocker, male chorus ; it reminds me of the Johnny Burnette Trio‘s « Shattered dreams » cut in NYC, already for Coral too.

Wee Willie Brown

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You were mean baby

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WEE WILLIE BROWN

(Al Rex – James Ferguson – Billy Williamson)

LOU GRAHAM (CORAL 9-61931, 1958)

Wee Willie Brown from my hometown

Got itchy feet, can’t settle down

New Cadillac, retailer’s pack

But that don’t bother him

He goes around, ’round, ’round

And all the girls all love him (they really love him)

Yes, the girls all love him (they really love him)

He ain’t no square, been everywhere

He goes around and around and around and around

Ain’t got a cent, can’t pay his rent

Landlord don’t know, which way he went

But when he’s gone, he’s really sent

No matter where he goes

He goes around, ’round, ’round

And all the girls all love him (they really love him)

Yes, the girls all love him (they really love him)

He ain’t no square, been everywhere

He goes around and around and around and around

Ain’t got a cent, can’t pay his rent

Landlord don’t know, which way he went

But when he’s gone, he’s really sent

No matter where he goes

He goes around, ’round, ’round

And all the girls all love him (they really love him)

Yes, the girls all love him (they really love him)

He ain’t no square, been everywhere

He goes around and around and around and around

(Lyrics taken from Black Cat Rockabilly Europe)

 

Graham Lou  "Wee Willlie Brown"Graham Lou  "You were mean baby"

Early October 2016 bopping (and rocking) fortnight’s favorites

smokey-rogers

Smokey Rogers

For a reason unknown, most of podcasts won’t open. Just click on the “Download” button to hear the music, when the player fails.

Onto the first Fortnight of this Autumn 2016. SMOKEY ROGERS (1917-1993) was a personality of the West coast and bandleader for s strong number of singers (Tex Wlliams, Ferlin Huskey) and releases (Capitol, Coral, Four Star, Starday and Shasta) from 1945 to 1965. On his (apparently) own label, Western Caravan, he even cut the first ever version of the classic « Gone » (# 901) in 1952. His label lasted with a handful of issues until 1955, among them I chose the great instrumental [not often in bopping] « John’s boogie » (Western Caravan 903). A real showcase for any musician involved (including ex-Hank Penny steel player virtuoso Joaquin Murphy), and every of them takes his solo or shines a way or the other. Splendid piano, horns, guitar, and of course steel, over an irresistible shuffle beat.

John’s boogie

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wc-903-smokey-rogers-johns-boogie

Another Smokey Rogers’ record has a young vocalist FERLIN HUSKY in April 1950 for « Lose your blues » on Coral 64063 (October 1950). It’s a nice shuffler with Huskey in good voice, and again Joaquin Murphy on steel.

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Ferlin Huskey, “Lose your blues

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bb-5-8-50-red-kirk

Billboard Aug. 5, 1950 – a proof of popularity of Red Kirk

Several months later (February 1951), RED KIRK, another singer himself modeled on Hank Williams, took at his turn «red-kirk-pic Lose your blues » for an acceptable version, quite impersonal but backed by the cream of Nashville (Zeke Turner, Louie Innis, Jerry Byrd, Tommy Jackson) , on Mercury 8257. Kirk had many other good songs, for example « Can’t understand a woman (who can’t understand her man »)(# 6288), « Knock out the lights and call the law » (# 6409), or later on Republic 7120 the double-sider « Red lipped girl/Davy Crockett blues » from 1956, , the good ballad “How still the night” on ABC-Paramount 9814, or his version of Loy Clingman‘s « It’s nothing to me » in 1957 on Ring 1503. I chose another Mercury disc, »Cold steel bues » (# 6309) from February 1951 and in the same ‘bluesy’ vein as « Lose your blues ».

Red Kirk, “Lose your blues

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Red Kirk, “Cold steel blues”

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mercury-6257-red-kirk-lose-your-blues11-50mercury-6309-red-kirk-cold-steel-blues

From Nashville, TN to Texas and Fort Worth for an Imperial session held in September 1954. FREDDY DAWSON (vocal) backed probably by himself on steel-guitar, Billy Chamber or Buddy Brady (fiddle), Jimmy Rollins (guitar), George McCoy (bass) and Phillip Sanchez (drums) cut 4 tracks, among them the above average « Dallas boogie » (# 8274)(nice fiddle and steel). 2 tracks do remain unissued, and « Why baby why » may not be the George Jones track, an original Jones song cut in August 1955.

“Dallas boogie”

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imperial-8274-freddy-dawson-dallas-boogie

bb-27-11-54-freddy-dawsonWe stand in Fort Worth, this time in 1957 with GENE RAY on the Cowtown label # 646 and « I lost my head », a good uptempo bopper. In November he was to cut for the same label the great Rockabilly cum Rocker « Rock and roll fever » on the EP-677, which contained also the good « Love proof ». Was he the same artist as on Playboy 300, who committed on wax « Playboy boogie » ? Nevertheless as front singer of the Dusty Miller’s band, he also had the great rocker « I’m going to Hollywood » in 1960. All these tunes are to be easily found on YouTube or various compilations.

cowtown-646-b-gene-ray-i-lost-my-head

“I lost my head”

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Now to the early ’60s in Orlando, Florida. WEBSTER DUNN, Jr. delivers a good country rocker on first side, « Black and dunmar-101-b-webster-dunn-jr-black-and-white-shoeswhite shoes » on the Dunmar (owned by DUNmar Peckam and MARy Yingst) label # 101. Echoed vocal, nice crisp guitar (+ a bridge), a welcome steel : a well-produced record. The second side has a sort of poppish vocal, although saved by the same guitar (ordinary solo) and steel : « Go go baby » is a typical Country uptempo ballad. (Record valued at $ 75-100).

Black and white shoes

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Go go baby

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Next artist seems to have possibly emananated from Dallas, Texas, as his label Amber, one out of three at the same time. It’s a 4* custom # 275 out in December 1957, and the artist is BOB GARMON, who delivers with « His Studio Combo », a neat and tight little band, one of the best Rockabillies ever, « I’m a-ready baby » (valued $ 500 to 1000). Great guitar solo, cool vocal on topical lyrics, the song has everything a Rockabilly devotee could dream of. The flipside, although bluesy, is equally good : a Rockabilly combo trying its hands at Blues for « Positively blues ». A very desirable record !amber-275-2-bob-garmon-positively-bluesamber-275-bob-garmon-im-a-ready-baby

I’m a-ready baby

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Positively blues

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Finally a R&B rocker by one of the greats, the albino « Blonde Bomber » (remember the Little Richard-esque « Strollie Bun » on Hull?), here under his other alias, LITTLE RED WALTER for « Aw shucks baby » on the N.Y. Le Sage (# 711) label. Walter is on guitar and harmonica (1960).lesage-711a-l-red-walter-aw-shucks-baby

little-red-walter

The Blonde Bomber, alias of Walter Rhodes, or Little Red Walter

Aw shucks baby”

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Enough for this time ! Sources are 45cat for label scans, or YouTube or Roots Vinyl Guide, even Rockin’ Country Style. 78Rpm-world (mainly Ronald – thanks to him). My own researches on the Net and my archives. Praguefrank’s Country discography (Smokey Rogers, Red Kirk discos). Michel Ruppli’s « Aladdin/Imperial labels » book. Values from : Barry K. John guide or Tom Lincoln/Dick Blackburn book.

Made on a ?