Late February 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks, this is the fourth portion of Country boogie or rockers for this 2020 year, and will contain no less than ten songs. I hope you will find something of interest here.

Lawson Rudd

A famous blogger and writer, Some Local Loser, posted in YouTube both sides of Starday 711. Originally released April 1958, this was the record debut for LAWON RUDD (born Salyersville, Ky in 1929 – deceased December 2011) backed by the Tippecanoe Valley Boys for two great sides. A-side was named « Country Town Girl », a superior uptempo mid-paced, great hillbilly vocal and rhythm guitar, fine steel all through the song (a short solo). B-side, « Blues On The Run » has a rhumba-beat (maraccas) and reminds one of Louisiana Lannis in « Much To Much » issued the year before (Starday 268){see Louisiana Lannis’ story elsewhere in this blog}.

But LAWSON RUDD’s best known side is to be found two years later (1960) on Kingsford Heights, Indiana based Harvest label (# 709) : « Shake This Town » has a lazy vocal, unobstrusive chorus and good backing for a late period Rockabilly : fine guitar and a trembling steel solo. The guitar player sounds as in Bill Bowen’s « Don’t Shoot Me Baby » (Meteor 5033) cut in April 1956, four years before ! Incidentally the flipside « No One Will Ever Know » couldn’t be traced, a pity..This disc is valued $ 100 to 150.

Paul Howard & Arkansas Cotton Pickers

The veteran PAUL HOWARD and his Arkansas Cotton Pickers do come next with « Texas Boogie » released in April 1949 on the King label 779. Actually a showcase, instrumental for the most part (steel, fiddle, guitar and of course a great piano) only adorrned by the vocal of RED PERKINS {see elsewhere in this blog his story}.

Red Perkins

Carolina Cotton

Then CAROLINA COTTON for a lazy vocal tune from May 1950 on M-G-M 10798B, « Lovin’ Ducky Daddy » has a ‘sugar’ voice, even some yodel and a good piano, but sparse backing (bass and drums).

Clay Allen & His Cimarron Playboys

More in 1950, on another major label (Decca 46324) the recording debut of CLAY ALLEN and his Cimarron Boys with « Evalina ». A good, although forgettable, uptempo ballad, the steel and the piano getting the better part behind the vocal.

The Country Dudes

Billboard, Sept. 28, 1959

Chuck Harding & His Colorado Cowhands

CHUCK HARDING was born in 1914 (Marion Cty, Ky.), the son of a minister who taught him the fiddle. With his Colorado Cowhands he released in March 1948 a fabulous « Talking The Blues » : really great bass, awesome vocal, mandolin, steel solo, great fiddle too. It was first released on Texas Blue Bonnet 135A, before being switched to a greater exposure on California’s Modern 581 in May of the same year. Personnel is wholly given on the back of Boppin’ Hillbilly # 19, issued a mere twenty years ago.

Harding was to have in March 1954 on the Des Moines, Ill. (a Northern suburb to Chicago) Replica label # 101 the fine double-sided « Stop Crying On My Shoulder » and « I’m Living In A Lonely World » : accordion well present to the fore (it has its solo), sparse backing and no fiddle but steel solo.

As a matter of comparison I add the original version of « Talking The Blues » (written by Harding and Pyle) by PETE PYLE on Bullet 602 released June 1946. Good guitar, fiddle solo, and a trembling steel over an extrovert vocal – a good disc, but not to the standard of Chuck Harding’s version.

Billboard May 27, 1954

And that’s it for this fortnight ! Pheewww, as usual, a lot of work (research and making-up) and a lot of fun too (listening to dozens songs before choosing the selection I prefer).

Sources: YouTube (Some Local Loser); 45cat and 78rpm worlds; Ohio River; HBR serie; my own archives

Danny Dedmon & his Rhythm Ramblers (1947-1953)

It has proven near impossible to find any biographical data about DANNY DEDMON. He may have been born in Louisiana, since his career was often confined to this state. His professional career begun in 1946, so he must have been in his twenties then, and already an accomplished guitar player being recruited by a ‘star’, Bill Nettles, for the latter’s Dallas recording session.

The Monroe Morning Star (March 23, 1947) showed the only certain known picture of Danny Dedmon (far left).

Bill Nettles & the Dixie Blue Boys

He was associated to KSAM in Huntsville, Tx. when Bill Nettles took him to KMLB in Monroe, La. and made him join as lead guitarist his Dixie Blue Boys. He then cut his first records under the leadership of Nettles in Dallas, Tx. for Bullet, a Nashville label, on July 7th 1946. Jim Bulleit was present at the session, as he was seeking for new talents for his label.

Bullet 637 (Too Many Blues/High Falutin’ Mama) and 638 (Hungry/You’re Breaking My Broken Heart Again) were good sellers for Bill Nettles, and not long after, he was approached by Lew Chudd’s scouts and subsequently signed a contract with Imperial Records, the then rising label in Country music with its 8000 serie launched during Summer 1947.

Danny Dedmon & the Rhythm Ramblers

Dedmon went solo with a contract on his own, and had 7 singles released under his name between Summer 1947 and October 1949, backed by his Rhythm Ramblers, who actually were Nettles’ Dixie Blue Boys in disguise.

« Hula Hula Woogie » (Imperial # 8019) is a call-and-response ditty ; a fine uptempo bopper (a sort of fast bluesy tune) with a fiddle all along the song (Robert Shivers), a mandolin (Nettles), guitar, and steel (« Cowboy » Thomas) solos, all propelled by the bass of own Nettles’ daughter Loyce, while Dedmon had an assured voice, that of a man accustomed to sing.

Billboard, Jan. 23, 1948

Reverse side « Too Many Blue Eyes » is slower, although equally good.

This first Danny Dedmon recording session may well have been cut at KOGT station in Orange, Texas, whom he was associated then with, or in Beaumont, Texas, where many early Imperial sides were recorded. Anyway Billboard noticed him in its early 1948 edition.

Autumn 1947 saw Danny Dedmon back in Beaumont studio for a long 8-tracks recording session. 4 tracks do remain unissued, but it’s obvious Imperial executives had faith in him cutting an entire session. Imperial 8023 (Why Should I Want You Now/It’s Time To Say Goodbye) escaped to my researching antennas, so cannot comment ; two other tracks out of this session however were finally released surprisingly during the second half of 1950. Why Imperial issued them so late is anybody’s guess. « I Don’t Want You Anymore » (Imperial 8099) is a fine, bouncing bopper. Every instrument involved has its solo (although except the string bass). The reverse side, « Lane Budded With Roses », a mid-paced weeeper, is forgettable. This # 8099 was credited to Danny Dedman : a typing error from the labels’ printer ?

In October 1947 Imperial files reveal one more unissued session (3 tunes), and one must wait December 1947 for a 4-track session more. Two tunes went also unissued : « That Chick Was Just My Size » sounds a promising track, talking of a bopper, while Imperial 8045 has two excellent numbers, namely a bluesy, mid-tempo shuffler, call-and-response format with « Hoochie Coochie Woogie » (Pee Wee Calhoun, a newcomer in the Dedmon team, is called before his piano solo) while « Drinkin’ Beer All Night » is a fast item.

Billboard, Jan. 29 1949

Ca. late 1947 and late 1948 Dedmon went to work with Jelly Jolly in clubs and touring, but made no records with him. February 1949 found him again in the Beaumont studio, for 4 more tracks, all released. Imperial 8058 bears two fine sides, and one can detect a Hank Williams influence from then on « You Can’t Hen Peck Me », an uptempo bopper ; « The Blues Keep On Hangin’ On » is a particularly effective fast bluesy tune with its two steel solos (by « Cowboy » Thomas) and the good fiddle of Robert Shivers. The piano takes a solo too, and was played either by Pee Wee Calhoun, either by the newcomer in the Dixie Blue Boys Pal Thibodeaux [see his study elsewhere in this site]. The remaining unheard sides included « That Lonesome Old Moon » and « That Blond Headed Gal Of Mine » and were released as Imperial 8061.

Billboard, Jan. 23, 1948

Is this really Danny Dedmon? (unknown origin)

The remaining tracks, and nearly the last Dedmon ever recorded, were cut in October 1949 with the same line-up of Bill Nettles’ Dixie Blue Boys. All these are rousing tunes. « Gin Drinkin’ Mama » (# 8065) is definitely one of his best songs : shouting vocal (although the voice is barely recongnizable), fast rhythm, as the reverse « Gonna Trade My Red Head For Blonde » (a mid-tempo). The long steel solo and the shiny fiddle playing make this a typical pure Honky tonk shuffler.
« Mama-In-Law Troubles » (# 8068) keeps along the same pattern as « Gin Drinkin’ Mama », when « Sweet Little Sweetie Pie » is also a romper : it’s another fabulous shuffler typical of the era.

How versatile he was is shown by 2 snippets taken in early 1949 from the Billboard. In January he had joined once more Bill Nettles at the time of the first Mercury session which gave in April “Hadacol Boogie” (but he was not present on the session); then in March 1949, he joined Cal Maddox (guitarist of the Maddox Brothers) on KTRM out of Modesto, California. Finally March 1951 found him back in the band of Jolly Jelly.

We find Danny Dedmon (this time backed by the Cain River Boys) once more on the L.A. Flair label (# 1005) released 1953. Things are very different from the previous Louisiana discs. The backing is a limited one : exit the fiddle. Accent is put on the omnipresent steel-guitar (NOT « Cowboy » Thomas, with aural evidence) and a tendency toward pop, particularly in « Sally Anne » ; « Maybe Things Will Work Out Right » has a pizzicato played lead guitar, and no rhythm at all. Both sides are written “Pee Wee (Calhoun?)-Dedmon”. Does it suggest that his band had followed him in California, or the Flair issue was simply recorded in Louisiana before its release on a near-major label (Flair had been launched in 1953 by Modern for issuing Southern artists)? This record is a question in itself.

Cash Box June 2, 1953

At this point, Danny Dedmon disappears from the music scene, except one big mention. He’s credited in October 1956 as co-writer of the Rockabilly classic « Hot Dog » by Corky Jones (actually Buck Owens) on Pep 107. Had he put his hand on this gone unnoticed little gem that he should have tickled all the record collectors since then.

Sources : my own archives ; HBR for Imperial label scans.Ronald Keppner for some music; 78worlds for some label scans; Billboard archives.