early June 2013 fortnight favorites

Howdy folks! Ready for a new musical trip? This time, very various things. First, the famous SHAGMAR BULLNASTY in 1963 on the Trash label doing “Tapping That Thing“. It’s a risqué lyrics song they say, I don’t know why. The same song with a slightly different tempo came out as BOLIVER SHAGNASTY on Quartercash (Tennessee label). It is rumoured that these names disguise rockabilly Mack Banks, and that the original version came from J. C. Cale (Youtube carries the story to the tune). Anyhow I offer the original version cut during the 40s by YANK RACHELL on the Bluebird label.

trash shagnasrty tapping

yank rachell

 

bluebird rachell tapping

Tapping That Thing

Shagmar Bullnasty

 

Well listen little kids I’m going to sing a little song

It goes like this and it won’t take long

 

I’m tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

I’m tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Well Ma and Pa was laying in the bed

Ma turned to Pa and then she said

 

Start tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

It’s a little old thing all covered with fuzz

The best damn pussy there ever was

 

Start tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Lets tap!

(solo)

 

Well I touched her up high and I touched here down low

I touched her in the middle and she didn’t let go.

 

Say tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Well I got it in the kitchen and I got it in the hall

I got it on my finger and I swing it on the wall

 

Say tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Well I took here in and I laid here on the floor

The wind from her ass blew the cat out the door

 

Said tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Let’s tap a little now

(another solo)

 

Mama’s in the kitchen and Papa’s in the jail

Sister’s on the corner hollerin’ pussy for sale

 

Sayin’ tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Well I cut it once and I cut it twice

The last time I cut it cut it deep and nice.

 

Sayin’ tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Now six times six makes thirty six

I’m only going to hit it about six more licks

 

Yeah tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

tapping that thing (tapping that thing)

Everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

 

Yeah everybody’s doing it everybody’s tapping that thing

(thanks to Mark Freese, who transcribed the lyrics)

 

 

From Alabama too came OTHELL SULLIVAN. He cut hillbilly on the Southern label in 1952, then in 1960 this fine uptempo “There’s Sure To Be Goodbyes” on the Reed label.

Another Hillbilly turning up to Rockabilly: BILL BLEVINS. During February 1953, he cut at the Holford Studio in Houston a session for Trumpet’s owner, Lilian McMurray. She issued “A Day Late And A Dollar Short”, typical Hillbilly bop of Mississipi, backed by Jimmy Swan’s band. This is the forerunner to Billy Barton’s song. Blevins resurfaced in 1957 on the very small National label for two rockabillies “Crazy Blues” and “Baby I Won’t Keep Waitin‘”, both threatening medium tempos.

Finally NORMAN SULLIVAN. He’s best known for a 1960 version of “Folsom Prison Blues” on the Roto label. Here is the flip side “She Called Me Baby”.

 

roto sullivan called

national blevins crazy

trumpet blevins late

reed sullivan goodbyes

early August 2012 fortnight’s favourites

Howdy folks. If you are there, you’re in for a musical journey in Hillblly bop music. Here we go for more obscure or lesser known names, who one cannot know anything about, except what it’s in the grooves, or what I gathered – and most of the time the harvest is a meager one. Talking about harvests, let’s not forget the “contact me” section: here are for sale excellent CDs or vinyl records (very nice condition) for sale from my collection. Don’t overpass this occasion!

Chuck Bowers did hail from Arkansas, where he was born in 1921. He was a regular of the St. Louis, MO. Ozark Jubilee and had a spot on KWTO. His acclaimed shuffler “Pig Pen Boogie” on the Kansas City Choice label (# 845) is one of the serie he did for radio or TV appearances. Actually you can find 3 songs by him that contain “boogie” in the title on Youtube! Later Bowers was on Decca for two Nashville produced pop rockers, the better being “Blabber Mouth Sidewalk Stroll” (# 30578) from 1957. I don’t know anything on Bowers afterwards.

chuck bowers

choice bowers pig

bart martin tears

billy martinWay up North and Michigan, on the Bart label. One Billy Martin has the really fine Hillbilly bop ballad “Tears I Couldn’t Hide” on the Bart label (# 7G28). Prominent steel over a very sincere vocal. The same Billy Martin had also « Angel »/ « If It’s Lovin’ That You Want » (Lucky 0009, 1960) and « I’m Home Again » (Fortune 198). . There were also issues on Happy Hearts, D, Cannon and Misty in the 70’s.

The very small – Kentucky based, as said in an old Hillbilly Reserarcher issue  – Dixiana label was launched in 1953, and do seem to have only lasted six months or so. From his 7 issues I chose The Renfro Brothers‘ “Just Over A Girl“, a fast romper led by a boogie pianist and showcased by an accordion (# 103). On the same label was issued Odis Blanton & his Blue Star Rangers, who I will post later the great “Steppin’ High Wide And Handsome“. On Dixiana 105, there is still a Cliff Gross to be found yet (both titles sound interesting).

dixiana renfro bros girl

baron angel walking

 

a&a angel walking

Walter Scott‘s great “I’m Walking Out” (see Ruby # 240, elsewhere in this site) was cut in 1968 by a L. C. Angel with Coye Farmer on the microscopic Baron label (no # number) out of Trenton, OH. The record gives full personal (steel-guitar-bass); so which instrument was played by Farmer or Angel? Incidentally the very same record was reissued twelve years later on the A & A label (still no #) out of Hamilton, OH. A fine version nevertheless, but the artist is completely out of sight!

Ben Hall has the fine “Moo Mama” Rockabilly on the Cord label (# 101). Very rare one; even rarer is the unissued at the time “Be Bop Ball“, saved from oblivion by the Dutchman!

Finally from a February 1932 session do come the very sexual “Red Nightgown Blues“, cut by Jimmie Davis for RCA-Victor (with sublime slide guitar by Oscar Woods) and issued in the Bluebird serie (# 5699). A tune that suits exactly to Jerry Lee Lewis‘ way of life, and one may wonder how he has not recorded this song (remember “Long Legged Woman” cut for Sun?)

cord hall moo

bluebird davis nightgownFlash (January 23rd, 2012). I received a mail from JIMMY RENFRO. His Dad Jim had not heard their songs within a very long time, so he was stunned and happy. His uncle Raymond did the same. Thanks Jimmy! I include in the posts the flipside of their Dixiana 103, “Ever Ready“. Alas, I don’t know any other record by them.
dixiana renfro-brothers ready

early July 2010 fortnight

Hello folks, here I am again, back in wonderful Vallée du Rhône (where I lived for more than 40 years): Roman monuments, wines, goat cheeses, near Lyon, the second city of France (rivalling Marseille). Here in Vienne we have one of the foremost Jazz Festivals all around Europe (1rst fortnight of July), held in a marvelous Roman theater (fantastic acoustic!). Among all artists will be this year Joe Cocker – he’s not a Hillbilly yet, you know, but one of the truly Soulful artists ever. The show is booked…

All my records are still in boxes, and the library has yet to be set up, later this Summer. So this early July fortnite will be made up of tunes stored on my Macintosch for accidental use like this one. No label pictures, no spare time left to research in my files, only the music. After all, it’s only music we all love that got importance, isn’t?

Here we go.First from Indiana (Ruby label) comes WALTER SCOTT and the fine Hillbilly bop “I’m Walkin’ Out” (1956) complete with swirling fiddles and steel-guitar. Then to Texas, I think (I may be wrong!), with the great HYLO BROWN, whose career was firmly dept in Bluegrass but flirted with Hillbilly at times. I’ve chosen his 1951 rendition of “Lonesome Road Blues” (Four Star). Down in Louisiana, here comes the Pope of Cajun accordion, NATHAN ABSHIRE and one of his first records (although he had already recorded in 1939) under his name, the fine instrumental “Lu Lu Boogie” (Khoury’s label, 1947). On to Nashville, and JIMMY MARTIN, one of the founding members of the Bluegrass style (he’s been once guitar player for Bill Monroe). The song herein is Bluegrass, indeed, but Jimmy has hiccups in his voice…that predate (in my mind anyway) Rockabilly! “Hop, Skip and Wobble” (Decca) Complete with fiddle, banjo, string-bass. Back to the real roots of Hillbilly of the Thirties: (Tom) DARBY & (Jimmy) TARLTON – the haunting “Sweet Sarah Blues” (may be from 1928? 1931? I cannot verify at the moment). Great, strange vocal, and wild dobro.

We finished with two very different tunes, separated by at least 50 years. BIG MACEO (Merryweather) was a fine piano player and intimate vocalist of Chicago in the early 40s. Hear his “I Got The Blues” (backed by Tampa Red on the fluid electric guitar). Then MAURA O’CONNELL (late 1990’s) and the beautiful (both melody and lyrics) “It’s A Beautiful Day”. Enjoy, folks!