Late August 2016 bopping and rocking fortnight’s favorites

Late August 2016 bopping and rocking fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! Hi ! To returning visitors. This a particularly important fortnight feature, because it includes no less than 11 selections !

We begin with an already reviewed artist (December 2010) in the article devoted to the K.C. label Westport. Here is the milt dickey picimportant and prolific MILT DICKEY. Born 1920, he was D.J. on KCMO during the early ’50s and cut nice boppers for first K.C. located Sho-Me label (# 528), like « Neon love ». The record must have been a regional success, as it was reissued exactly as same on Coral 64146 in 1953. I include the B-side of his Westport 129 disc (« Television love »), the fine weeper « Bleeding heart » with piano and fiddle backing and a good steel as expected. Dickey also released « Checkbook baby » on Coral 64169.

Neon love

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sho-me 528A milt dickey - neon lovewestport 129 milt dickey - bleeding heart

 

Bleeding heart

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I’ll walk a mile

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Still in Kansas, but 1963 for the next artist. BOB MARRIOTT & the Continentals is an hybrid of Country-rock, Soul and Rock’n’roll with jayco 702 bob marriott - I'll walk a mile«  I’ll walk a mile » (Jayco 702). I know such an item may come upon Bopping’s visitors’ ears, but I like the drive of the tune, the harsh voice of the singer Chuck Vallent and a good guitar. You can of course disagree and leave a negative comment !

From Nashville in a more settled Country mould here’s PAUL DAVIS. During the ’50s he had two mgm 12357 paul davis - big money(56)releases on M-G-M, the very fine « I don’t want a backseat driver » (# 12472, to be found on the Cactus « M-G-M Hillbilly, vol. 2 » compilation) and now « Big money » (# 12357, recorded June 18, 1956). « Big money » but a « single man »…Good shuffler according to Nashville standards : steel guitar throughout and good guitar over a relax vocal.

Big money

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Five years later Davis would record the prototype of any truck repertoire with the original of « Six days on the road » released on the small Bulletin label # 1001 (reviewed June 18 1961, well nearly two years before the Dave Dudley hit). Fabulous wailing steel guitar, a lot of echo both on vocal and backing. By far according to my tastes the best version !

Six days on the road

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bulletin 1001 paul davis - six days (18-6-61)

Dave DudleySix days on the road

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golden wing 3020 dave dudley - six days on the road

 

 

 

« Carroll county blues » was recorded on March 11 1929 by NARMOUR & SMITH, a duet emanating from Mississipi. The lead figure is taken on fiddle by Will Narmour, who befriended bluesman Mississipi John Hurt, and sustained by Shell (Sheriff) Smith on guitar. The tune has something of hypnotic, and was said to have come from the whistling of some black farmer. It’s been the duet’s greatest hit, and was revived on the Clarion reissue as Jones & Billings. Pretty old and crude Hillbilly !

narmour & smith

Carroll county blues

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clarion 5129jones & billings - carroll cty blues(11-3-29)

Out of Trumansburg, N.Y. Seemingly in ’57 comes a pretty tame version of the Drifters’ « Money honey » by JANECE MORGAN with the Melody Men on the Marlee (# 101) label. An agreeable guitar and a too discrete steel over the singer, a poor man’s (woman’s!) Wanda Jackson. She had also a « First from» on Marlee 103, described as « teen rockabilly » on a ebay sale.

Money honey

downloadmarlee 57-101B janece morgan - money honey(NY)

 

The name DEE STONE can be a bit familiar to Bluegrass afficionados, as he had at last 3 issues in 1952-53 on the Blue Ridge (from Virginia) and Mutual (from Illinois) labels, all backed by His Virginia Mountain Boys or his Melody Hill-billys. This time we find him on Blue Ridge 304 for « Countin’ the days », a very good Bluegrass uptempo tune (banjo and fiddle) over a duet vocal. In fact, this could as well be described, minus the banjo, as Hillbilly. Later on (in 1956, according to RCA « G » prefix), the man appears on Eastern (location unknown) for two great boppers, steel to the fore, and a piano : « Sun of love » and « Drifting down this lonely road ». An artist who we wish to hear more from. Final disc in 1960: « Ocean of dreams/After the dance » also on Eastern 12460.

blue ridge 304 dee stone - countin' the daysCountin’ the days

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Sun of love

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Drifting down this lonely road

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eastern G-725 dee stone - sun of loveeastern G-726 dee stone - drifting down this lonely road

Finally, a R&B rocker, cut in 1954 at a Clarksdale, MS radio station. Ike Turner was present at the session but didn’t play on this harsh-voiced « I’m tired of beggin’ », inspired by Junior Parker‘s « Feelin’ good » 1953 hit [Sun 187] by Eugene « THE SLY FOX ». Here he is pictured 20 years later, as Clarksdale high school principal. Of course the Spark label (# 108) was run by Leiber & Stoller out of Los Angeles, and had in its stall the Robins, Big Boy Groves and Ray Agee. Fox would cut « My four women/Alley music »(# 112) just at the time Atlantic bought this important small label late 1955.

I’m tired of beggin‘”

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spark 108 78 sly fox

Sources: Tony Russell book (“C&W 1921-1945”); YouTube; 45rpm-cat and 78rpm-world; my own archives; Les Fancourt “Blues records, 1943-1970”, Michel Ruppli’s “MGM label, vol. 1”

eugene fox

Early July 2015 fortnight’s favorites

Arlen Vaden was D.J. at WCKY out of Cincinati, OH, when he launched in 1958 his own Vaden label. The first issue (# 100) of the new label was by BOBBY BROWN & The Curios, who consisted of Brown (vocal, rhythm guitar), Shorty Stewart (lead guitar), Tommy Jones (bass) and Johnny Welker (drums). This record was cut at WCKY, and later on reissued on Vaden 107. « I Get The Blues “ is of course bluesy with a fine lead guitar (long solo).

I Get The Blues

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Bobby’s Blues

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vaden EP 107 bobby brown - I get the blues

vaden 109 bobbybrown - bobby's blues

 

 

Early 1959 saw Bobby Brown back for another issue on Vaden 109, this time cut at KLCN radio in Blytheville, Arkansas. Twin-lead guitars (J.C. Caughron & Tommy Holder), Larry Donn (bass), Johnny Welker (drums), but the most important and pulsating instrument is Teddy Redell‘s piano, who adds a brillant and pulsating flavor to « Bobby’s blues ». Thanks to Alexander Petrauskas who provided me with all the information. Do visit his great blogsite « Arkansas 45rpm records » or “Mellow’s Log Cabin“!

 

 

We go further East in North Wilkesboro, in N. Carolina, circa 1952-53, for a fine double-sider first on the Blue Ridge label (# 306) by LARRY RICHARDSON [banjo] & Happy Smith & the Blue Ridge Boys. Two songs are in discussion : « I’m Lonesome » and « Just Let Me Fall », both superior Bluegrass tunes, billed « Hillbilly » on the labels ! Thanks « 53jaybop » to have posted them two songs on Youtube. Later on, Richardson had on the MKB label, out of Virginia (no #) what it seems to be a rocking effort, »I’m Lonesome/I’ll Fall In Love With You » (alas untraced). We finally find him back on Blue Ridge 516 in 1960/62 for « The Nahville Jail », again a fast and fine Bluegrass number or « Wild Over Me » (great fast mandolin by Clinton Bullins?) on MKB 130 from 1968.

I’m Lonesome

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Just Let Me Fall

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larry richardson

Larry Richardson

blue ridge 306 larry richardson - I'm lonesome
blue ridge 306 just let me fall

larry richardson2

Larry Richardson on banjo

Nashville Jail

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Wild Over Me

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Way up North now for the Omaha, Nebraska Applause label : the TERRIFIC TABORS (with their leader Paul Tabor ? He at last holds the credit) offer a pretty weird mix of Bluegrass (unisson chorus) and garage rocker on « Rockin’ The Boat » from 1961. There’s even what sounds a steel behind the backing of guitars. The flip side, which sounds an instrumental (« Tabor Tromp ») remains untraced.

applause 1251 terrific tabord - rockin' the boat

Rockin’ The Boat

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charlie bowman

Charlie Bowman

 

Real old Hillbilly now by CHARLIE BOWMAN & His Hill Billies on the Brunswick label. Bowman was a fiddler and a banjo player on several sides cut in New York with the Hopkins Brothers between October 1926 and May 1927 : « East Tennessee Blues » and « Riding That Mule ».

East Tennessee Blues

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Riding That Mule

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Finally a SHORTY LONG, who has apparently nothing to do with the S. Long I discussed thoroughly earlier in this site, does a romping R&B rocker (saxes), although the voice sounds white, with « Redstone John » on the K-Son label (# 7283). Location unknown.
k-son 7283 shorty long - redstone john

Redstone John

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Sources : YouTube, www.Arkansas45rpm-records,Tony Russell’s Country Music Records 1921-1942. Any correction or addition welcome !

 

Early November 2014 fortnight favorites: a bunch of Bluegrass 78rpm!

Howdy folks ! With just an exception, only 78rpm this time.

Let’s begin with the legendary JIM EANES in one of his earliest efforts on the Blue Ridge (#301) label. It’s happy hillbilly bordering to bluegrass (sometimes difficult to distinguish, but who cares?) : « A sweeter love than yours I’ll never know ». Fine solos : banjo, mandolin over chorus vocals.

blue ridge 301 a sweeter love
Smilin’ Jim Eanes “A sweeter love than yours I’ll never know

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Lucky Leroy “Now get join’

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Lucky Leroy “All tied up”

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go-lish 100A

Thanks to Hillbilly Researcher and Allan Turner, LUCKY LEROY and two sides on the Illinois Go-lish label « Now get goin’ » and « All tied up ». Solid hillbilly from 1955.

On the Mutual label (uncertain origin, probably Chicago, or generally Illinois), CLAUDE YATES & Bowes Brothers for « Stop knocking at my door » (#214) : as label implies, « hot banjo picking ».

Same label, FRED MURPHY for the very inspired « I want to be ready » (#210).

Bowes Brothers “Stop knocking at my door”

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Fred Murphy “I want to be ready

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mutual 214B bowes brothers - stop knocking at my doormutual 210-B fred murphy I want to be ready
 

A return to Blue Ridge with LARRY RICHARDSON (& Happy Smith) (#306) and « I’m lonesome ». High-pitched vocal, again that mix of hillbilly and bluegrass music.

Finally for the season, HAPPY WILSON on M-G-M 10877 « The haunted house boogie ».
Larry Richardson “I’m lonesome

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Happy Wilson “The haunted house boogie”

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blue ridge 306 I'm lonesome
mgm 10877 happy wilson

KED KILLEN & Western All Stars: Virginia/Kentucky late ’60s Hillbilly Bop

KED KILLEN was born on May 10, 1911 in Jenkins, Kentucky and raised there. From the time he was a teenager until 25 years of age, Killen sang and played the guitar only locally with other musicians at neighborhood meet-togethers and in Virginia.

He had compiled a group of musicians which he named Western All Stars. Early ‘50s he had a record on the Johnson City, TN, Rich-R’-Tone label. In 1957 he cut a disc for the microscopic Grundy, Va., Kyva label, a Starday custom. It was a gospel influenced very fine Hillbilly bop.

“Crying blues “(Rich-R’-Tone, 1954)

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kyva 707 ked killen


No more opportunity came Ked’s way to record until he had seen an ad and write-up on Western Ranch Music record label run by Norm Kelly, out of Thornton, Ca. It was in early 1966 when he contacted the company with an audition tape. The company liked his down-to-earth country sounds and signed him to a recording contract on August 1, 1966. Until retiring in late 1969 playing only for family and friends Killen cut 20 sides for the aforementioned label. They have been recently reissued by Western Ranch.

wrm 119A killen hey

wrm 119B killen lonesome

Ked’s records had some very good ratings in various areas. Not too much has been known about his personal life, except he was married and had two children. Through the studio where he recorded in Virginia, Binge records (who re-released all his Western Ranch Music output) found out that he was working on another tape when illness and death struck his wife June, leaving him very distraught and depressed, until he became quite ill himself and passed away in 1986.

His music on Western Ranch (1966-69) could well have been cut 15 years earlier. His voice would have been suitable for the early ‘50s country sounds. His backing usually consists of Killen himself on vocal and rhythm guitar, steel and/or fiddle, st-b, sometimes an electric lead-guitar:  very sparse accompaniment which fits well his sincere vocal.

The poor picture of Killen is all what’s left from the Western Ranch Music vaults.

killen LP3

(reprinted from (D) Binge LP 1010 “Ked Killen and his Western All Stars – Country Music is here to stay”, 1989)

discography is to be found here: Ked Killen (Praguesfrank)


Addition (September 10th, 2012). A recent acquisition in an auction, another Ked Killen 45 on KyVa 101 (Kentucky-Virginia), “Lonesome Blues“/”Let Another Love Move In“. Similar style as Western Ranch music, although it’s very hard to determine if these KyVa sides were contemporary or earlier to Western Ranch Considering the earlier Kyva issue discussed was from early 1958, this should also fit in the same period. Anyway still good Hillbilly bop music! Also first mention of a backing group.

wrm 106-A EP Ked killen WRM 119-B Ked killen Lonesome blues

wrm 106-A EP Ked killen

Joe Franklin & the Mimosa Boys: N.C. Hillbilly and Bluegrass gospel (also Rock’n’Roll…)

Joe Franklin and his Mimosa Boys        Joe Franklin pic

Very few information available on this North Carolina artist. He’d begin in Bluegrass style on Blue Ridge with « There’ll Be No Wedding Bells For Me », the flipside being Honky tonk: « Half Hearted Love » on Blue Ridge 401. Here he delivers a fast number with gospel overtones. His superb voice is well suited to this kind of number and aided by his Mimosa Quartet on backup harmony and a romping piano player.

blueB love

label courtesy John Burton


Then his second disc, « If I Could Just Make It In », a real stomper of a number on Blue Ridge 202, a label based in North Wilkesboro, N.C.. With a driving beat and some superb guitar and piano behind Joe’s vocal. Joe was a DJ at WMNC, Morganton, some thirty odd miles at the time. He was later to secure a contract with MGM.

north-carolina-county-map

North Wilkesboro in far North West of the state

In my opinion (Phillip J. Tricker), one of the great unknowns of Hillbilly music. A piano is always very prominent on his recordings and I wonder if indeed it is Joe who pounds the ivories. The Mimosa Boys are a very tightly knit outfit that sounds like they are been together for a long time. Excellent steel and fiddle (Jim Buchanan ?) provide solid foils to some amazing piano work which is much more powerful than the usual ‘rinky dink’ style usually associated to Hillbilly recordings from this period, 1953. « Hitch-Hikin’ Blues » slows the pace a little but is in own right a very classy Honky tonkin’ side with some lovely work from the fiddle player while the steel player underpins everything well. THE side is « Hillbilly Boy », fast and furious, fantastic piano, short steel & fiddle solo. Both on MGM 11612.

MGM 11612 refaitemgm 11612 franklin hitch

Joe has two unissued sides from this July 1953 session.

He then disappeared completely, which is a real shame!

Flash! I came today (July 21, 2011) on 3 more discs by Joe Franklin. Via the “Starday-Dixie Rockabilly vol 2” on  (UK) Ace, I found he was vocally fronting the Hi-Liters in 1958 for a (probably) Don Pierce production on Mercury.  Both  sides (“Dance Me To Death” and the unissued-at-the-time “Big Bad Wolf“) are to be found on Mercury  71342 from 1958.  mercury 71342 hi-liters dance me


 

Strangely Michel Ruppli’s book “The Mercury label” gives the recording location as Universal studio in Chicago. Great rockers, a voice similar to the MGM artist of 5 years before, with again that rollicking piano (some could say a la Little Richard) in the background. The original flipside of “Dance Me To Death” is sung by a Daryl Petty (“Cha Cha Rock“). “Too Late For Tears” (Daryl Petty, vocal) remains unissued.

Then billed as “Joe Franklin and the Hi-Liters“, he had two more discs between 1959-60 on the Durham, North Carolina Renown label. They are of far lesser interest. The Renown 113 “Who Put The Pep In The Punch/True Blue” (latter song written by Darryl Petty) is billed as “white vocal group” by 45rpmrecord.com blogsite. Franklin returns to his bluegrass roots with “The Belle Of Tennessee” (Renown 114), although more pop/folk than real Bluegrass. “Swanee River Rock“, the final side, is a sax led instrumental, with again fine piano in the background.

renonwn 113 franklin who put

Sources: Boppin’ Hillbilly serie (3 volumes), Youtube, 45rpmrecords.com.

Final note: Mr. David Hill wrote me this message on Feb. 20th, 2012: “I was saddened to hear that Joe Franklin had passed, but I appreciate the info from your site. I have a newspaper article around 1958, Bristol, VA concerning Darrell Petty, who was Joe Franklin’s piano player and his association with Joe, and the sale of Petty’s song A MILLION MILES FROM NOWHERE. I would like to share all my info with those interested. I would like to know what happened to Darrell Petty.  Sincerely, David Hill”. So now we know who was the piano player on these discs! In a second message, Mr. Hill sent me scanned the article from “Bristol Herald Courier”, which gave more details on Darrell Petty. He had only 9 fingers, having been injured at 10 in a saw mill. The drummer was Mel Taylor, who later went with the Ventures, and another Franklin’s musician was Joe Buchanan (unknown instrument). It seems that anybody lost their trail after 1959-60. Here it is the first ever picture of Darrell Petty, tanks to Mr. Hill.

darrell petty

Flash (Friday, May 25, 2012), the excellent and undefatigable Mr. David Hill sent me a message as follow: “Here are some more photos and info I obtained from Burke County Public Library in Morganton, NC. This was Joe’s hometown. Daryl Petty passed away in the 70’s with cancer. I have been in touch with Joe’s sister. There is a display in the Burke County Museum on Joe and The Hi-Liters. I plan to visit there one day soon. Still bopping, David Hill”. Below are the press snippets of the Morganton, N.C. News Herald he sent me, from the beginning of 1958, also the Joe Franklin obit from 2001. Thanks, Mr. Hill!

Morganton N.C. News Herald, Jan. 21, 1958

Morganton, N.C. News Herald, Jan. 1, 1958

Morganton News Herald, Feb. 27, 1958

Latest news (Jan. 9th, 2013) : message from Jim Buchanan, fiddler/drummer for Joe Franklin (1951-1959)

I was the eleven year old Fiddler/Drummer with Joe Franklin beginning in 1951. I performed on the Ed Sullivan TV Show with Joe and daily live TV Shows at WCYB Channel 5 in Bristol Va.during the early Fifties. If you want to know anything about Darryl Petty, Ray Austin, James Duckworth, Charlie Connley or any other Mimosa Boys/Hi Litersn, ask the only living Member of the Band. I was there a part of it from the beginning. I have Audio recordings of the Mimosa Quartet recorded at WTOE Spruce Pine NC while Joe was a DJ there. I also have all the major news paper articles published during the time that I was with Joe Franklin. The Burke County Museum has the Suit that I wore on the Ed Sullivan Show as well as other articles such as pictures of me while with Mel Tillis performing at President Ronald Reagans inaugural ball in 1980. I left Joe Franklin in 1959 to work with Arthur Smith in Charlotte NC at WBTV. Later into Bluegrass Music with Jim and Jesse and the Virgina Boys WSM in Nashville. Mel Tillis during the 70s and part of the 80s.

David Grisman in San Francisco. George Jones in the 90s till 2008. Now teaching from Home in Franklin TN. Also a recording studio and producing and publishing. Church Band each

Sunday and simi retired from touring with groups. I can now do it my way….. after 60 yrs.

 

Yours truly, Jim Buchanan –  jim buchanan@live.com. Thanks, Mr. Buchanan! Now we know the name of Joe Franklin’s musicians.