Wheeling, W. Va. hillbilly: the DUSTY OWENS story (1954-57)

Dusty Owens was born on September 2, 1930 in Fairdealing, Missouri as Robert James Kucharski. Shortly after his birth, his family moved to Flint, Michigan where he spent most of his childhood. When he was 6 years old, Robert took violin lessons in school but he later moved to accordion which seemed to be more to his liking. In 1947, while in High school, he joined a local western band called the O.K. Boys to play the accordion. Later that year Robert became their front man and changed the band’s name to Dusty Owens and his Rodeo Boys.

In 1947 Owens entered Flint Technical High School but he soon dropped out and moved to Saginaw, Michigan, to find a job as a professional musician. It was in St. Joseph, Missouri, while working for radio station KFEQ that he received his first official pay as a musician. When Glen Harris of Shenandoah, Iowa radio station KMA asked Dusty to come work for him, he moved to Iowa. At KMA he got acquainted with the famous Blackwood Brothers Quartet and with Ike Everly, the father of Everly Brothers Don and Phil. Ike was largely responsible for Dusty’s later career: he stimulated Dusty to concentrate on a singing rather than on playing the accordion and he helped him to get his own weekly 15-minute radio show at KMA. Ike treated Dusty as his pupil and took him to all kinds of events that might be helpful for Dusty’s singing career.

In 1949 Dusty Owens recorded several radio transcriptions for “Mother’s Best Flour” as well as for “Lassie Feeds” but when he got married later that year, he returned to Flint to work as an accordion teacher at a local school of music. In 1951, he and his former band the Rodeo Boys regrouped and briefly worked for radio station WHO, Des Moines. Apart from doing their regular weekday radio shows, the Rodeo Boys also were part of the “Iowa Barn Dance Frolic” that was broadcasted on Saturday nights.

In 1953, Dusty and his band joined the Wheeling Jamboree from Wheeling, West-Virginia, which was one of the most famous barn dances at the time. That same year Owens signed a songwriters contract with Acuff-Rose and on October 1, 1953 he signed a recording contract with Columbia Records. It was a standard contract for one year against a royalty rate of 2% of 90% and two one-year options.

On October 28, 1953 Dusty Owens did his first recording session for Columbia, with Hank Williams’ Drifting Cowboys and Chet Atkins providing the back-up. During the session at the Castle studio in Nashville’s Tulane hotel, he recorded four songs that were all self penned. Columbia released “Hello, Operator” and “The Life You Want To Live” (Columbia 21202) in January, 1954 and in May they released “Just Call On Me” and Somewhere She’s Waiting” (Columbia 21260).

The second recording session for Columbia was done on June 3, 1954, and again, Columbia released all four songs.

Don Law decided to exercise the first option in Owens’ contract and on June 21, 1955, he did his third recording session for the label. Only two songs of this session were eventually issued and Columbia didn’t exercise the second option.

In 1956 Owens recorded six songs for his own Admiral label, including his most famous song “Once More” that was later cut by many others including George Jones, Melba Montgomery, the Osborne Brothers, Roy Acuff and Dolly Parton. During the 1960’s he recorded for Wynwood, but the quality of those recordings was inferior to his previous output.

Dusty Owens, a music appreciation (by bopping’s editor)

The Columbia sides (1954-1955) are generally of high standard. Although Owens is more at ease with medium paced tear-jerkers, he offers also some very good fast boppers. Let’s investigate his records side by side.

« Hello, operator » (# 21202) is a fast uptempo with fine fiddle and bass. A steel solo and a brisk vocal. Its flipside «The life you want to live » is a sincere medium paced shuffler.

Billboard April 30, 1954


“Hello, operator”

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“The life you want to live”

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Billboard June 26, 1954

More of the previous one with the follow-up « Just call on me » # 21260) : a warm voice over a fine fiddle. Its flipside « Somewhere she’s waiting » is an uptempo which shines the steel of Don Helms in.

“Just call on me”

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Somewhere she’s waiting

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A good song is « They didn’t know the difference (but I did) » (# 21310), an uptempo with fast fiddle and bass. « A love that once was mine » is a weeper that can be remoted.

Billboard Oct. 23, 1954

They didn’t know the difference (but I did)

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The last 4 Columbia sides are all medium paced weepers, sometimes very sincere, but excitement is gone, and no song really comes to light.

The Admiral sides are in comparison far superior than the Columbias.

A very great early 1956 fast duet first « It’s goodbye and so long » (# 1000) with Donna Darlene (1938-2017), paired with the all-time hit « Once more » : an energetic blend of duet vocal, fiddle and steel.

It’s goodbye and so long

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Once more

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« Cure that shyness » (# 1002) has Don Owens solo and is a fast bopper. « A place for homeless hearts » is a medium paced tune with great ‘hillbilly’ voice. « Hey honey » ( 1004) is a good version of the Wiley Barkdull song (Hickory 1074) and dates from 1957. The flip « Our love affair » is a fast shuffler with strong bass.

Cure that shyness

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A place for homeless hearts

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Wiley Barkdull, “Hey honey”

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Dusty Owens, “Hey honey”

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I am putting aside Dusty Owens last sides (Admiral 1008) once his label was relocated in Florida : both songs are really poppish and outside the scope of this blog.

I added the very fine Rockabilly/bopper « You’re not doin’ me right » (Admiral 1003) by Donna Darlene, certainly backed by Dusty Owens’ Rodeos.

You’re not doin’ me right

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And mention must be made of the Abbie Neal Rockabilly platters on the label: “Newton’s law” (# 1001), “If again” (# 1006) and “Hillbilly beat” (# 15000). They may come in later fortnight’s favorites.

Biography and Columbia songs taken from W. Agenant « Columbia 20000 serie » blog ; Admiral songs from various sources, mainly YouTube. Labels from 45-cat or 78rpm-world. Dusty Owens pictures from Hillbilly-Music site.

Late November bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! Another selection concentrating between 1954 and 1957, but with the early odd side from…1929 and the latest from 1964.

Here we go with SKEETER BONN (born 1923 Junior Lewis Bougham) he had a long serie of sides cut early to mid-’50s for RCA. skeeter-bonn-picI’ve chosen the two-sider #(21-6352 from 1955) « There’s no use now », a good medium paced opus with a Bonn in fine extrovert and exuberant voice over a classic backing of discreet steel and bass. The flipside « Rock-a-bye baby » is faster, fine guitar, for this eternal kiddie (?) theme.

There’s no use nowrca-6352-skeetr-bonn-theres-no-use-now

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Rock-a-bye baby

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His next came in 1957, « Chained » has a harsh vocal and a lot of echo for a real fast song. I don’t know where it was first issued, on Admiral 1007 out of Wheeling, W.Va. or on Town and Country 129, a Polan Springs, Mo. label.

tc-1295-skeeter-bonn-chainedadmiral-1007-skeeter-bonn-chained

Chained

download GAYLON WAYNE (Wayne Williams) next, was born in 1935 in Kentucky, and is best known for the furious « Red hot wayne-williamsmama » on the Tenn. Sure label – a bit outside the scope of this blog. I retained a side he cut on Delta # 1044, the fine Hank Williams styled « I ain’t gonna sing the blues », full of energy (drums), over a romping piano and a fiddle always present. Year unknown, maybe 1957-58. On the NL Redita 117 label which was combining every good tracks he recorded, « Steel guitar work » once attributed to him, is omitted : it was in fact done by a group Kiliman HawaIans.

I ain’t gonna sing the blues

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delta-1044-gaylon-wayne-i-aint-gonna-sing-the-blues
Now a wildie from..1929 (Sept. 29) by WILL EZELL (1892-1963) (piano/vocal) : « Pitchin’ boogie » was recorded for Paramount (# 1285) in Richmond, IN. with Baby James on cornet, a bass player and a tambourine. The boogie woogie craze was on its way ! His style remembers one of Jimmy Blythe, boogie and ragtime artist.

Pitchin’ boogieparamount-1285-will-ezell-pitchin-boogie

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During the late 40s a basically Bluegrass group, that of the McCORMICK BROTHERS, originally from Westmoreland, TN. had their show on WHIN in Gallatin and WKYS on the Hayloft Jamboree. They (Harold, rhythm guitar – Haskell, banjo – Kelly, mandolin – and Lloyd, guitar – backed by Benny Clark on fiddle and Hayden Clark on bass) enjoyed so much success that in 1954 they entered Hickory studio on Franklin Avenue in Nashville to cut their first sides : « Red hen boogie » (# 1013), and later « The Billy Goat boogie » (# 1024) are fine duelling banjo and fiddle tunes, largely inspired by the vocal harmonies of the Delmores. These quaint although swinging performances led straight to Rock’n’roll.

hickory-1013-mccormick-red-hen-boogiehickory-1021-mccormick-the-billy-goat-boogie

Red hen boogie

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The Billy Goat boogie

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Another personality well-known during the ’80s in Europe was GLEN GLENN (rn Glen Trout). He had a few records in dore-8717-glenn-trout-i-didnt-have-the-sense-to-go1957-58 on Era in California, but managed to publish (in Sweden) earlier sides more in the Hillbilly vein. From 1957 came « I saw my castles fall today » recorded at Cal’s Corral from KCOP, Modesto, Ca.: a fine ballad full of emotion, with the guitar playing of Gary Lambert. Now to a demo from September 1956, « It rains, rains », a superb shuffler. Ralph Mooney is on steel. Finally on Doré (# 717), « I didn’t have the sense to go «  is more of a Country-rocker from 1964.

I saw my castles fall today

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It rains, rains

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“I didn’t have the sense to go

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Sources : my own collection ; as usual, YouTube ; Hillbilly-music.com ; 78rpm world.

Bill S. out of south Texas. Thanks for your kind words and visits. I’m glad to please you with my selections. Your comments are fully appreciated !

late February 2013 fortnight favourites: the ADMIRAL label (Wheeling, W. Va)

Hello again ! This time I will concentrate on a Wheeling, W. Va label by the mid-50s : ADMIRAL, and two artists from its roster, ABBIE NEAL and DUSTY OWENS. Actually the Admiral label had a short life and a very few artists, among them RAY ANDERSON (remember « Stalin Kicked The Bucket » on Kentucky, and « Sputnicks And Mutnicks » on Starday?)

DUSTY OWENS was the most well-known of both, originally from Detroit, MI. By the time he had relocated in W. Va. And had had a long stint with Columbia Records. He opens the serie (# 1000), duetting with a certain Donna Darlene and backed by the Rodeo Boys. « Once More » is a fine hillbilly shuffler, later revived by the Osborne Brothers on M-G-M, and in the ’90s by Chris Hillman and his Desert Rose Band. The flispide « It’s Goodbye And So Long » is a fast fiddle led hillbilly. On # 1004 Owens revives in 1957 the Wiley Barkdull « Hey, Honey », originally issued on Hickory 1074. A good version, with a lot of slap-bass on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABBIE NEAL is a Rockabilly chick, backed by her Ranch Girls. « Hillbilly Beat » (# 15000, unusual in the sequence) however has nothing to do with hillbilly music : it’s a fast Rock’n’Roll opus led by a hot saxophone ; some might call it « jump ». Flipside « I’ll Take Back That Heartache » is an urgent vocal rockabilly, excellent backing. « If Again » on # 1006 has Neal duetting on a fast, jumping hillbilly – strong guitar, fiddle all along.

 

 

I know nothing more than that I wrote, except Dusty Owens, whose long career is well documented. He even had a CD a few years ago on the German Bronco Buster label gathering some of his Columbia sides. Abbie Neal has a serie of very nice video clips on YouTube.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s now hear the podcasts. Enjoy and comment !

Labels from Youtube or popsike. Admiral 15000 was supplied (sound and label) by Tony Biggs. Thanks!

Ray Anderson, “Stalin Kicked The Bucket” (1953), coldwar hillbilly bop

Stalin Kicked The Bucket: Ray Anderson [1953]

If Joseph Stalin inspired some harsh songs during his lifetime, his death ignited even more vitriol. Anderson’s unforgiving lyrics (“He died with a hemorrhage in the brain, they have a new fireman on the devil’s train“) are set against such a cheerful country melody that someone unfamiliar with the English language might mistake the tune for a square dance record. (more…)