Late September 2013 fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks! Well it’s been quite some time since I last posted. Lot of work this Summer, down in Marseille (south of France) where I’d set my younger daughter as student in her flat up. Last post (today): an important article on the JACOBY Brothers (TNT and Columbia recordings). Nearly all their output is posted in a new presentation. I hope it will please you. Let me know. By now, for this fortnight, we begin with the guitar player of the Miller Brothers, EDDIE MILLER. He lets his bass player Jim McGraw take the lead on this April 1956 4 Star 1693 issue, “Patty cake man“, a typical 4 Star pano led honky tonker.

4 star 1693-45 eddie miller patty cake man

Another important artist on the West coast was ROCKY BILL FORD, mostly known for his 1951 “Beer drinking blues”, easily found on many compilations. Lesser known is his “Willie Dum Dee” on Gilt-Edge 9 from 1951: typical baritone voice for this fine shuffler.

Rocky Bill Ford: Willie Dum Dee
gilt-edge T-9 willie dum dee

From Joliet, Illinois, 1957, comes JIMMIE LAUDERDALE for a joyful, hopping “Right away, quick! quick!” country-rocker on the Jopz label. Nice guitar.   Right away, quick quick Download jopz jimmie lauderdale   Now BEN BAKER for two tracks on the Cool label from Harrison, NJ. Atmospheric hillbilly bop (one waltz tempo). Lots of echo on the steel and fiddle. Nice tunes: “Tomorrow your leaving“(sic) and “Too late now“. strong>Tommow you_re leaving/span> Download

Too late now
cool 129A ben baker tomorrow your leavingcool 129B too late now

Finally a R&B romper with CECIL GANT and “Nashville jumps“, one of the early sides on Bullet out of Nashville. Enjoy the selections! Bye. Nashville jumps  

bullet 250A nashville jumps

Jimmie Heap & The Melody Masters: Texas honky-tonk (1948-1955)

 

James Arthur “Jimmie Heap” (later Jimmy) was born March 3rd, 1922 in Taylor, Tx. He died at only 55 on December 3rd, 1977, on account of a boat accident in Lake Buchanan. His corpse was rescued only one day after.   heap pic

Jimmie’s career did begin shortly after discharge from U.S.A.F. during WWII,  more exactly said in 1947. Arlie Carter (piano), Horace Barnett (rhythm guitar), “Big” Bill Glendenings (bass) and Louis Renson (or Rencon) (fiddle), all belonged to the Melody Masters right from the start. Later they were joined by Cecil R. “Butterball” Harris (steel-guitar). Indeed  Jimmie Heap was on vocal and lead guitar.

With appearances on radio KTAE (from 1948 to 1956) and in clubs, they were always fully booked up. A Barnett composition about a club they were frequently playing at, “Dessau Hall Waltz” soon found the interest of Lasso Records, who cut the band during the Spring of 1948. Their first singles appeared therefore on this tiny label. They even had leased masters on 4 Star, wrongly credited to “Dolores & Blue Bonnet Boys”.   (more…)

early April 2010 fortnite

Howdy folks! Here we go for another fortnight’s batch of favorites. 1947, Capitol studios, Hollywood, California, the MILO TWINS and the classic duet “Truck Driver’s Boogie” (78rpm). Later on  I will give you everything I know of the Milo Twins, who disappeared shortly afterwards. Then on 4 Star: AL VAUGHN and his great midtempo “She’s An Oakie”, from 1950-51. From Texas, 1952, we can listen to another classic (originally Harry Choates’ on Gold Star), “Cattin’ Around”, Western swing style, by CHARLIE ADAMS (Columbia). His story is also can be traced on this blogsite. Texas too, and a phenomenon: BILL MACK, D.J. in Beaumont, had many sides on Starday. I’ve chosen “Play My Boogie” (fabulous piano) from 1953. Cisco, Texas, on the Rose label, from 1955; a transition between Hillbilly Bop and Rockabilly, “Have You Heard The Gossip” by CHARLIE BROWN. Finally, a much later disc on the Solar label (could be as well from 1959 to 1962!), nice Country-rock by LEE EDMOND, “When I’m Alone”. Anyone has got details? Enjoy the music, comments welcome!

milo+sootsal vaughnrose 102

SLIM WILLET, “Don’t Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes”, Texas, 1952

SLIM WILLET (notes to Collector CD 2857)slim willet tête

Slim Willet will forever be remembered as the composer of « Don’t Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes ». The song was a monster hit in 1952, initially for Slim Willet himself, then for the likes of Skeets McDonald, Ray Price and Red Foley. The song also made inroads into the pop field, with successful covers by a slew of pop singers, including a N° 1 hit for Perry Como in 1953.

Ironically « Don’t let the Stars Get In Your Eyes » was the B side of Willet’s second release on his own 4 STAR Custom pressed SLIM WILLET label. Slim gleefully recalled in a 1950’s article in COWBOY SONGS that 4 STAR had written to him upon receipt of his masters advising him that « Don’t Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes » was – quote – « Off beat, off meter, off everything and would not sell ». Needless to say when the record started to attract considerable attention, 4 STAR speedily reconsidered their position, brushed aside any doubs they may have harboured about the song, and signed Slim Willet to a recording deal.

Before taking a closer look at what led on from the success of « Don’t let The Stars Get In Your Eyes », it would be better to first take a glance at Willet’s formative years in order to put events into perspective. (more…)