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late May 2014 fortnight favorites
mai 15th, 2014 by xavier

This time we focus on 3 artists only. First DARNELL MILLER, who has enjoyed a comfortable Country music career for 5 decades in W. Va (a long-time affiliate to the famous WVA Jamboree), is present here with three of his early records. On the Dale label (a Starday custom) # 630 from Bluefield, W.Va, in May 1957, he released a very honest medium-paced hillbilly (fiddle present) with « Gettin’ out of the woods« . Two years later, he was to have two nice Country-rockers on the main Starday serie (in the meantime, he had been presented to Don Pierce, boss of the label, in Nashville). He delivers the energetic « Royal flush » (Starday 422) as well, several months later, the equally nice (where he seems to double his voice over) « Back to you » (Starday 459). Later on, he cut many, many records until his retirement early in the 2000s.

DarnellMillerPicture1

Darnell Miller, ’90s

630-B (dale) darnellmiller gettin' out of the woods

starday 422 darnell miller royal flush

starday 452 darnell miller back to you

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Darnell Miller « Gettin’ out of the woods » download

Darnell Miller « Royal flush » download

Darnell Miller « Back to you » download

 

The second artist presented here has no biographical data. BILL DUDLEY had cut in Nashville a good amount of records from 1953 to 1972 (in Canada) then disappeared from Dick Grant’s antennas. I’ve chosen the nice hillbilly released in November 1953 by Capitol (# 2662) « If I cry« . All in all, he recorded between 1953 and 1954 thirteen tracks for this label, which issued 4 singles. The next track by him is the fine Country-rocker « Oh please Mr. Conductor » on the Todd label (# 1046) from 1959. This tiny label issued several good disks during this period by Lee Bonds, Jimmie Fletcher or Jericho Jones, to name the most well-known in the Hillbilly bop/Country-rock field.capitol 2662 bill dudley - If I cry
Bill Dudley « If I cry » download

todd 1046 bill dudley oh please mr. conductor

Bill Dudley « Oh please Mr. Conductor » download
Down in Louisiana, I will dwell on JOEY GILLS upon. A protégé of Jay D. Miller, and né Joseph Guillot, he hailed from Thibodeaux vicinity, La. where he was born on a farm in 1929 (died 2013).A relative to Cajun superstar Johnnie Allan, during the early ’50s, he often gigged with Rusty & Doug, and he sounded so much as Hank Williams that J. D. Miller often used him to test new songs. Here it is his first record from 1953-54 « Hey Meon » (Feature 2002), cut in Crowley, La (J. D. Miller studio): Gills is backed by Lonnie Jones (later known as « Lazy Lester« ) on washboard, Johnny on steel (Miller can’t remember his full name) and Wiley Barkdull on piano for a very good waltz-paced ditty, partly sung in French. In February or March 1956, he cut 4 tracks for Mercury, either in Crowley, or in Nashville, which included the great medium boppers « (I am) Like a dog without a bone », « My name is Joe » and « Consolation prize« . From then on, Gills had his own radio show in Thibodeaux on KTIB, but recorded only this song (found on Youtube).
Joey Gills: « Hey Meon »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/feature-2002-Joey-Gills-Hey-Meon.mp3download
Joey Gills « Like a dog without a bone »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Joey-Gills-Im-Like-A-Dog-Without-A-Bone-1956.mp3download
Joey Gills « My name is Joe »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/06-My-Name-Is-Joe-Joey-Gills.mp3ref= »http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/06-My-Name-Is-Joe-Joey-Gills.mp3″ target= »_blank »>download
Joey Gills « Consolation prize » download
Joey Gills « Baby, leave your troubles at home »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Baby-Leave-Your-Troubles-At-Home-Joey-Gills.mp3downloadmercury 70867 gills a dogmercury 70832 Gills Joe recadrée

feature 2002 joey gills hey meon

Early May 2014 fortnight’s favorites
mai 1st, 2014 by xavier

Howdy folks, the first serie of the two selections for May.

The exuberant « It always happens to me » by RUFUS SHOFFNER & JOYCE SONGER (wife of Earl) cut in Detroit in 1962 seems stylistically go back to the mid to late ’50s. It’s a great fast bopper (piano, guitar and an energetic rhythm, and an exulting duet vocal), which  was issued on Fortune’s label subsidiary Hi-Q 14, and can still be found on various recent compilations, as in Boppin’ Hillbilly vol. 5. Shoffner made several fine sides on Hi-Q or Fortune, or earlier on Kentucky’s Countryside label. More on him later in this site.       »It always happens to me » download

rufus shoffner

Rufus Shoffner

More famous from the West coast is TENNESSEE ERNIE FORD (1919-1991),who cut a fine string of Hillbilly boogies from the end of the ’40s (« Milk ‘em in the morning blues« ) to the mid-50s, when he crossed the marked with the top-seller « Sixteen tons » (written by Merle Travis). Here he delivers from July 1950 on Capitol 1295 the much acclaimed « The shot gun boogie » (which had many, many versions later by others, even during the R&R era, f.e. Jesse Lee Turner), backed by the Cliffie Stone crew, among them the excellent Speedy West (steel), Billy Liebert (piano) and Jimmy Bryant (ld guitar).

220px-Tennessee_Ernie_Ford_1957

T. Ernie in 1957

T. Ernie Ford « The shot gun boogie » download

 

hiQ 17 rufuscapitol  1295 shotgun boogie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the rest  of the selections, we’re turning to obscure artists. From Pennsylvania in 1958 on the Skyline label (not to be confused with the Indianapolis label: the Blankenship Brothers) # 106 comes BOB ENGLAR and  » Always dreaming« , a very nice bopper (guitar/steel/fiddle solos). FRANK DARRIS had in 1963 the same energy as Englar for an honest Rockabilly, his personal version of Marty Robbins’ « Ruby Ann » on the Roy label. The wizardry is the same two-sided disc came on two other labels, Thunder and Advance. Another Rockabilly we find from Alabama, early ’60s, « Baby I don’t care » (not the Elvis’ song) by DAVID GREGG on the McDowell label.

Bob Englar « Always dreaming » download

Frank Darris « Ruby Ann » download

skyline 106B

 

 

roy 1030mc dowell

 

 

David Gregg, »Baby I don’t care » download
Dempsey Sims, « Blue eyed baby » (Sam version)
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Dempsey-Sims-Blue-Eyed-Baby-Country-Bop-45-Sam-Version.mp3download

Dempsey Sims, « Blue-eyed baby » (Huber version)download

Finally the same song, « Blue eyed baby » is a yodeling bopper first issued in 1956 on Esta 284 (untraced)and  later recorded twice by DEMPSEY SIMS in 1957 on Huber (time 2’39″) and Sam (time 2’07″). The Sam version seems more polished. Dempsey later had « Blues tomorrow » in 1967 on the Nashville label.

I feel sorry for the light defaults of the scans: my sight is failing (too much reading microscopic master numbers on records!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sam 122huber 1003

 

 

 

 

Carl Smith and the Tunesmiths: « Go boy go » – rockin’ Nashville hillbilly (1953-55)
avr 19th, 2014 by xavier

He was an enormously successful and popular country music star, a man who recorded over 90 chart hits with a unique style that wasn’t exactly rockabilly, but certainly influenced the shape it hillbilly rockers to come. He was related to hillbilly royalty through his marriage to June Carter, not to mention that his daughter became a country music hit maker in her own right. You know who I’m talking about of course – the one and only Carl Smith. (He also wore black on occasion, but to the point…)
maynardvilleBorn in 1927, and hailing from Roy Acuff’s hometown of Maynardville, Tennessee, Carl Smith grew up like many Southern boys of the depression, idolizing singing cowboys in the movies and hillbilly musicians on the radio. Acquiring his first guitar at the age of ten, Smith took advantage of any opportunity to play music at local dances, socials and school programs. He found work as a professional musician while he was still in high school in various bands centered around Knoxville and Cas Walker’s radio show on station WROL. But his pursuit of a fulltime music career was temporarily interrupted by his stint in the U.S. Navy in 1945-46.carl smith pic
After returning from the service, Smith found fulltime work as a musician in the Knoxville area where WROL was becoming a triple-A farm team of sorts for the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville and a prime location for record companies to discover up-and-comers in the hillbilly scene. In 1950, with Hank Williams selling records hand over fist for MGM, every major label was looking for stars that could deliver the new, post-war, hard-edged honky tonk style. For Columbia Records, the then 23 year-old Carl Smith was just what they were looking for. Smith found himself in the fast lane to hillbilly stardom, signed to both the Grand Ole Opry and Columbia Records in less than a month. While he might not have been the tortured hillbilly poet that Hank was, Smith had many other assets including a strong, clear voice, his country boy good looks, a head full of wavy hair, and perhaps best of all, he lacked the self-destructive tendencies that were constantly derailing Williams’ career.Smith quickly proved himself a master of just about any form of hillbilly music he set his sights on — from Eddy Arnold-style crooners to Hank Williams-style honky-tonk heartbreakers, to heartfelt gospel that any mother would approve of. But the style that Smith really made his own came from Saturday nights, not Sunday mornings. It was “honky-tonk stomp.” Up-tempo slices of hillbilly bravado and swagger like “(When You Feel Like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There,” “Trademark,”  “Hey Joe!” , « Dog-gone It, Baby, I’m In Love » and “Back Up Buddy” where Smith really made his mark on the evolving palette of hillbilly music.

col 21129 hey joe!

col 21197 dog-gone it baby

col 4-21226 back up buddy

 

 

 

 

It was a style that Hank Williams had pioneered with songs like “Honky Tonkin’” and “Mind Your Own Business” and that he referred to as “sock rhythm.”  But ole Hank’s “sock” was just the 2-4 backbeat that had marked the dividing line between white and black popular music for so long, and that more and more hillbilly musicians were picking up on in the late forties. Smith was a natural for this younger, hipper and hotter form of hillbilly music, but he never came across as the threatening rebel. “The Country Gentleman,” as he became known, could deliver a heartbreaking ballad that brought tears to the eyes of the bluest blue-nose and then toss off a stomper that thrilled the budding teeny-bopper crowd with his down home machismo.

« hey Joe! » download
« Dog-gone it baby, I’m in love »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Carl-Smith-Dog-Gone-It-Baby-Im-In-Love-1954.mp3download
« Back up buddy »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/columbia-21266-carl-smith-BACK-UP-BUDDY.mp3download

While seldom acknowledged as such, Carl Smith, along with other honky-tonk stompers like Webb Pierce, Faron Young and Hawkshaw Hawkins were adding the final ingredients to the musical gumbo that would spit out rockabilly in just a few years. The young, hot shot attitude, combined with a driving beat and the good looks of many of these honky tonkers provided true swoon appeal to a generation of corn-fed gals, whose younger sisters would be screaming for the “Memphis Flash” and his fellow rockabilly cats in just a few short years. But of course you gotta have a hot band to play hot music, and that’s exactly what Smith assembled with his road band, The Tunesmiths. Featuring top session men like Junior Husky (on bass) and Buddy Harman, but most especially the master steel guitarist, Johnny Silbert (then 17 years old), the Tunesmiths developed a hot style that drew from both Western Swing and the nascent rock’n’roll beat. Other Tunesmiths’ members included drummer Farris Coursey, ex-Hank Williams’ Drifting Cowboys Sammy Pruett on lead guitar or future Jordanaires’ Gordon Stoker on piano. There’s never been any fiddle in Smith’s hillbilly boppers, another sign of him being ahead of his time.

juniorhuskey03

johnny-silbert

han-sp

Sammy Pruett left to Hank

sammy pruett

Sammy Pruett

gordon stoker

Gordon Stoker

A perfect example of the musical style that Carl Smith and the Tunesmiths developed is their 1955 recording of “Baby I’m Ready.”  It’s a song that both swings and rocks as Smith declares his readiness to show his lady a hot time on the town. And all with a charm that probably left the young lady’s mother and father smiling and waving from the front porch as that “good boy” took their daughter out for a night of hillbilly whoopee.

col 21411 baby, I'm ready

 

 

 

 

« Baby, I’m Ready » download

Ricky Van Shelton « Baby I’m ready » (1987)download

Also take a listen to the proto-rockabilly (by rhythm and lyrics) « Go Boy Go » or « No, I don’t believe I will »

col 21226 go, boy go

« Go, boy go » download
« No, I don’t believe I will »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/13-Carl-Smith-No-I-Dont-Believe-I-Will.mp3download>download
In June of 1952, Smith married June Carter, daughter of musical matriarch Maybelle Carter. The couple settled just north of Nashville in the suburb of Madison. Smith cut several gospel recordings with the Carter Sisters, and in 1954 the couple cut a pair of novelty songs with June playing comedic foil to the more straight-laced Smith in sort of gender-switched hillbilly version of the shtick that Louis Prima and Keely Smith were conquering Vegas with. The couple’s next collaboration, their daughter, and future country star Carlene Carter arrived in 1955.
But even among hillbilly royalty, matrimony is not without its challenges. The couple split in 1956 with Smith marrying fellow Grand Ole Opry star, and hillbilly music’s first “glamour queen” Goldie Hill the following year. Smith left the Opry near the end of 1956 in a swirl of behind-the-scene politics to take top billing on the Phillip Morris Country Music Show, a free traveling revue sponsored by the cigarette company that ran through 1957 and ’58, often playing the same cities and dates as the Opry-sponsored road show. Smith then made the leap to TV stardom as the co-host of Five Star Jubilee and later the Canadian-produced Carl Smith’s Country Music Hall.
The Tunesmiths: « Oh! stop »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/columbia-21386-The-Tunesmiths-Oh-Stop.mp3download
The Tunesmiths: « Doorstep to Heaven »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/columbia-21522-CARL-SMITH-WITH-THE-TUNESMITHS-doorstep-to-heaven.mp3download

Although his hottest period was in the pre-Elvis era, Smith continued to produce solid country hits through the sixties and early seventies. He even managed to hold the strings and vocal chorus of the then popular “Nashville Sound” at bay on his recordings, staying true to a more traditional honky tonk sound. He left Columbia Records in 1973 and after a short stint on Hickory Records made the rare move of voluntarily retiring from the music business in 1978.carl smith
He spent his later years enjoying the fruits of a country boy’s dream, on his 500 acre horse and cattle ranch in Williamson County, Tennessee. He was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2003. His wife Goldie, passed away in 2005 with Smith following her in January of 2010 at the age of 82.
Reflecting on his decision to retire from the music business Smith told Tim Ghianni in a 2003 interview for the Tennessean, “I just wanted to play cowboy. My philosophy is doing what I want to do.”  A darn good philosophy for a country boy, but of course we can all be grateful that for a time, bringing a hot beat, a snarl and a swagger to country music was just what Carl Smith wanted to do and what he was best at.

 

Biography and pictures taken from the net. Scans and music mostly from private collections.

Bill Carter, « By the sweat of my brow », California hillbilly bop/rockabilly
avr 15th, 2014 by xavier

Nothing to do with Jimmy Carter’s supposed brother ! That Bill Carter was a member of the Big Jim DeNoone’s Rhythm Busters.Bill Carter autographe

His story begins on December 12, 1929, when he was born in Eagleton, Arkansas, one of ten siblings, the son of an itinerant share cropper. By the time he was nine years old, he was singing on KGHI out of Little Rock, Arkansas. In 1937 , the family moved to Broken Bow, Oklahoma. Bill’s father got a job with the Southern Pacific Railroad in Indio, California, in 1943, and the family headed west. Bill’s interest in music was encouraged, and he took voice lessons during his teens, as well as performing on radio stations KRBO (Indio) and KROX (Modesto), modelling himself on Eddy Arnold. After graduating from Coachella Valley High school, Bill gained employment with the Johnson lumber Company in Grass Valley, and confined his performings to weekends.

In 1949 he joined USAF, and whilst stationed at Lackland and subsequently Parks AFB in Calfornia, Bill formed several bands, playing with the likes of Shorty Lavender (lead guitar and fiddle), Slim Roberts (fiddle), and Bob Cooper (drums). His music was firmly strenched in C&W and performing at NCO clubs kept his hand in. Whilst still in the Air Force, he got to perform with Cal Smith’s band in San Leandro, as well as playing dates in the San Francisco area, and venturing as far afield as San Antonio, Texas radio stations to perform. Read the rest of this entry »

late April 2014 fortnight favorites
avr 15th, 2014 by xavier

For this early Spring favorites selection, I’ve chosen mostly – that is unusual – major labels recordings!

The first three on King probably all cut in Cincinnati between 1949 and 1950. The earliest track is by RED PERKINS (born in 1890), who had begun his career before WWII and was later the featured vocalist of PAUL HOWARD  Arkansas Cotton  Pickers (see below). Here it is his « Hoe-Down Boogie » (King 792), a fine call-and-response fast bopper. He also had « Crocodile tears » the next year. His first issue on King (# 773) was « Texas Boogie« , and the personnel was then Jabbo Arrington [gt], Billy Bowman [steel], Bob Moore [bass], Roddy Bristol [fiddle], Fiddlin’ Red Herron [fiddle], Joe Rea [drums], poss. Harold Horner [piano]. The backing is probably similar.

king 792-AA red perkins hoe-down boogie

king 871-AA DJ paul howard the boogies fine tonight

Second selection is of course by PAUL HOWARD: « The boogie’s fine tonight« . Fine piano bopper (# 871), and the next is by the famous REDD STEWART, featured vocalist of Pee Wee King‘s Golden West Cowboys. Actually, except accordion (inaudible) the GWC are the backing band of Stewart for this great « Brother drop dead » (# 843). Fine piano, aggressive steel punctuating the beat.

 

paul howard

Paul Howard

Red Perkins, « Hoe-down boogie » download

Paul Howard « The boogie’s fine tonight » download

 

 

king 843AA Redd stewart brother drop dead boogiecapitol 2715 gene o'quin I specialize in love

One step away to West coast on the Capitol label for GENE O’QUIN and « I specialize in love » (# 2715). Fast bopper from 1954.
Gene O’Quin « I specialize in love » download

Back to early days. Dallas, Texas, Jim Beck’s studio, April 1951. The MERCER  Brothers (Wallace and Charlie), an old-time male duet do a very energetic « Wish bone » on Columbia 20978. They sound like the Delmore Brothers, and even have WAYNE RANEY on harmonica for a great solo! Thanks to Jack Dumery to have led me to them (and for the CD!)

redd stewart

Redd Stewart

Mercer Brothers « Wish bone » download

Eddie Crosby « Blues stay away from me » download

Danny Dedmon « Hula hula woogie » download

 

 

 

 

The link with the former is the Delmore and a version of their all-time great « Blues stay away from me« , a cityfied rendition (Cincinnat, August 1949) by EDDIE CROSBY. Nice guitar (could be Zeke Turner).

Finally back in Dallas with DANNY DEDMON, former vocalist of Bill Nettles. Actually his Rhythm Ramblers are Nettles’ Dixie Blues boys. Here he does in 1947 the amusing « Hula hula boogie » on Imperial 8019.

columbia 20927 mercer bros. wish bonedecca 46180 eddie crosby blues stay away from meimperial 8019 danny dedmon hula hula woogie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources: my own collection and the net for artists pictures.

early April 2014 fortnight’s favorites: the IMPERIAL label, 8200 serie (1953/54)
avr 1st, 2014 by xavier

For this new serie I have chosen to focus on 7 releases on the Imperial label. Indeed they all will be from the famous 8000 serie, and more precisely (with one exception) in the 8200.

Imperial 8000 had begun in 1947 with releases from Danny Dedmon or Link Davis, and the serie had pursued throughout the late 40s and early 50s with varying success. Sides appeared by Jimmy Heap, Tommy Duncan or more obscure artists as Ed Camp or Harry Rodcay. All had a label adorned by 5 stars, and were issued in red (78 rpm) or blue (45 rpm). Majority of sides were cut in Dallas (Jim Beck’s studio).

In 1953, Imperial had a huge success with the first white cover of Big Mama Thornton’s « Hound Dog » by BILLY STARR (# 8186). It’s a very nice version: belting vocal, haunting guitar, nice piano and accentuated drums. Actually it’s almost a rocker. Recorded in March 1953, it had contenders by Eddie Hazlewood, Betsy Gay and Tommy Duncan, all on Intro. Herald in NY had Cleve Jackson’s version (actually Jackson Toombs — full story elsewhere in the site).

imperial 8186 billy starr

imperial 8226 curley sanders too much lovin'

imperial 8204 gene hensleeThen comes up CURLEY SANDERS, who cut « Too much loving’ » in April 53. A good, fast hillbilly, in average (steel,piano, fiddle, guitar and bass) format.(# 8226). GENE HENSLEE next (# 8204) in June 53 had « I’m like a kid a-waitin’ », similar to his other releases, « Dig’n'datin’ » or « Rockin’ baby ». July 1953 saw cut the nice, very effective (bass) medium paced « Talking to the man in the moon » by BILLY Mc GHEE (# 8214).

Billy Starr « Hound dog » download
Curley Sanders « Too much lovin’ » download

Gene Henslee « I’m like a kid a-waitin’ » download

 

imperial8214 billy mcghee

Billy McGhee « Talking to the man in the moon » download

Earl Songer « Whoopie baby » download

Van Howard « I’m not a kid anymore » download

imperial 8259 earlsonger

Then comes in 1954 next artist, VAN HOWARD and the minor classic « I’m not a kid anymore » (# 8234). Real name Howard Vanderverdner. This track was covered recently (mid 90s) by the Starlighters.

# 8259 is the number to the great « Whoopie baby » by EARL SONGER. Seemingly this was cut in Detroit.

Finally another song lent from a smaller label: « Dunce cap » by JIMMY KELLY, this time from Louisiana’s Jiffy label. Great steel.(# 8275)imperial 8275 jimmy kelly ret
Jimmy Kelly « Dunce cap » download
Thanks to Ronald Keppner for the loan of rare 78rpm.

Earl Songer

late March 2014 fortnight’s favorites
mar 15th, 2014 by xavier

Let’s begin this new favorites selection with the first (?) record by an artist who would have much, much later fame as Boxcar Willie. Here he’s named MARTY MARTIN on the Honeycomb label and he sings a good « Mobile, Alabama blues ».

honey comb 102 marty martin Mobile, Alabama blues

poor boy 105 les & hlen tussey they went around

MGM 4070 arthur smith guitar and piano boogie

Marty Martin « Mobile, Alabama blues » download

Les & Helen Tussey « They went around » download

From Indiana in 1960 we find on the Wayne Raney‘s label Poor Boy LES & HELEN TUSSEY doing the nice rockabilly « They went around« .

Next is a famous ARTHUR SMITH on a rare French MGM Issue for the instrumental « Guitar and piano boogie ». Title says it all.

 

Arthur Smith « Guitar and piano boogie » download

 

 

Finally, thanks to a Mr. Noel T, I put my hands on two rare JESS WILLARD disks. First the completely unknown G&G 107 double-sider « I’m branding my darling with my heart » (earlier cut by Jack Guthrie) and « Hillbilly heaven » (this is apparently not Eddie Dean’s song). Both sides are gentle hillbilly boppers from 1957. G&G was a parent label to Ka-Hi which Willard had « I’m telling you » on. Second is the Sundown 126 « Cops and robbers/Night time is cry time » from 1959, posthumously issued. Alas, both sides are completely pop.

Jess Willard « I’m branding my darling with my heart » download

g&g107A Jess Willard hillbilly heaven
Jess Willard « Hillbilly heaven » download
g&g107b jess willard I'm branding my darling with my heart

 

 

 

 

Jess Willard « Night time is cry time » download

Jess Willard « Cops and robbers » download

 

sundown 126A Jess willard night time is cry time

sundown 126B Jess willard cops and robbers

« I’m a truck driving man » – the ART GIBSON story (1912-1971)
mar 11th, 2014 by xavier

Despite recording fairly prolifically (36 sides cut for Mercury between 1946 and 1949) in the years immediately following World War II, Art Gibson is not widely remembered these days among the fans of vintage country music. Among hard-core collectors of the music of the 1940s-50s, however, he is highly revered, his recordings ardently collected , and celebrated as one of the most individual and infectious honky-tonk performers of the era. He’s cut mostly for Mercury (1946-49), and two single sessions later, one for the small Replica label in 1954, the other for Sunny during the 60s.art gibson 2

The high quality of his output aside, it isn’t surprising that Gibson is not better remembered these days for he kept a surprisingly low profile for most of his career. Other than a mid-40s photograph in the music mag The Mountain Broadcast and Prairie recorder, and a handful of very brief mentions in other music press of the era, he seems to have mostly operated under the radar, not courting much publicity, playing clubs and letting his music speak for itself. This low-key approach accounts, at least in part, for the fact that he didn’t become a bigger star, as it has proved a frustrating roadblock for any researcher hoping to build a fuller picture of his activities in his recording heyday and beyond. Much about Art Gibson’s career remains a mystery, and internet is mute about him. What is certain, however, is that he was a fine honky-tonk singer and songwriter, and that he left a compelling recorded legacy that deserves to be more widely heard. Read the rest of this entry »

early March 2014 fortnight’s favorites
mar 4th, 2014 by xavier

Howdy y’all, folks. A little bit late, back from holidays. Here is my new choice of favorites. As usual, a selection of tunes of the great era.
HARRY HANSON on the Louisiana Empire label (# 795, a Starday custom) with « Just remember » from 1959. Fine primitive hillbilly bop which could well have been cut 3 or 4 years earlier.
empire 795B Harry hanson just remember

fortune 185 cal davis partnership love affair rec

Harry Hanson, « Just remember » download

Cal Davis, « Partnership love affair » download

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Detroit on Fortune 185, CAL DAVIS and rockabilly « Partnership love affair« , complete with steel and guitar.
Two sides by the very good EUEL HALL from Texas, on the Towne House label (# 11). Lazy vocal, assuring guitar for « Blue feeling » and « Stand in line« . Cross between hillbilly bop and rockabilly.

towne house 11 euell hall blue feeling

tex 105B billy barnett tired of your honky tonk love rec

towne house 11 euel hall stand in line

Euel Hall « Stand in line » download
Euel Hall, « Blue feeling »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/towne-house-11-Euel-Hall-Blue-Feeling.mp3download

BILLY BARNETT now and the minor classic « Tired of your honky tonk love » on the Phoenix Tex label (# 105). Fine guitar.
And finally, a fast bluegrass bopper by KEN CLARK, « Big man » on Starday 495 from 1960. Great banjo and mandolin backing. Ken Clark was also on the Nashville label (see elsewhere in the site).
Billy Barnett « Tired of your honky tonk love »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Tex-105B-Billy-Barnett-Tired-Of-Your-Honky-Tonk-Love-www.keepvid.com_.mp3download

starday 495 ken clark big man
Ken Clark, « Big man » download

early February 2014 fortnight’s favorites
fév 3rd, 2014 by xavier

Howdy folks. Excuse me, a little bit late…

First on the D label (#1034), the very Hollyish « Sady » by DOUG STANFORD. Very nice Rockabilly guitar and vocal hiccups. A medium bluesy « Separate ration blues » by BILL FREEMAN (later on All-star)(vocal « Buddy » Young): good piano, sax and fiddle.

d 1034A doug stanford sady

tex-talentwinkler 88Hillbilly boogie with AL WINKLER for « Show boat boogie » on the Winkler label # 45-88 . Boogie guitar, mandolin, and call-and-response format.

Doug Stanford, « Sady »download

 Bill Freeman (Bddy Young) « Separate ration blues » download

 Al Winkler, « Show boat boogie » download

 

 

 

 

 

From Indiana, a fast blegrass, « A use to be » by BRYANT WILSON on Adair 620. A nice atmospheric (steel led) « Stoney mountain » by BOBBY BROWN on Backwater 945.

And finally CHUCK GODDARD on the famous Georgia Trepur label (# 1005) with the piano-led « The moon won’t tell« .

adair 620 bryant wilson A use to be Rblackwater 945 bobby brown Stoney-mountaintrepur 1005 Bryant Wilson « A use to be » download
Bobby Brown « Stoney mountain » download
Chuck Goddard « The moon won’t tell » download
There will be next fortnight in early March only.

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