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Hobart, OK : the HU-SE-CO label (1956-1958)
jan 29th, 2014 by xavier

Hu-se-co was founded by Odell Johnson in Hobart, Oklahoma. The label apparently lasted from late 1956 to early 1958, and the main issues were issued in 1957. No label listing does exist, so I don’t know if my presentation is complete, as Hu-se-co was a pretty small label for the time being.hobart

First record was cut in Autumn 1956 by DERAL CLOUR and Charley Drake and coupled the very fine primitive Hillbilly bopper/Rockabilly « Sundown (boogie) » with the ballad « Winter (in my heart) ». Clour has said in an interview published by the RockaBilly HOF that the record was cut at Gene Sullivan’s studio on Capitol Hill in Hobart. Deral Clour was to appear at Ernest Tubb’s in Nashville in 1959.

huseco 1056A deral clour sundown (boogie)

DeralandCharleyBW

Deral Clour & Charley Drake

huseco A1056B deral clour winter

Deral Clour and Charley Drake « Sundown (boogie) » download

Deral Clour and Charley Drake, « Winter (in my heart) » download

Then in 1957, three singles of equal musical value. Most important is the rollicking/jumping//western sides by DOYLE MADDEN, backed by Merl Lindsay‘s Oklahoma Nightriders, « Gonna learn to rock » and « Tonights the night for love » (1-757), both written by Lindsay and one Vonnie Mack. The latter (rn Yvonne deVaney) was at one time Yvonne O’Day on Capitol, then in 1956 Vonnie Mack in 1956 on Columbia, where she turned more or less pop. Later she fronted vocally Merl Lindsay’s band.
Doyle Madden « Gonna learn to rock » download
Doyle Madden, « Tonights the night for love »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/hu-se-co-757A-Doyle-Madden-Tonights-The-Night-For-Love.mp3download

Second record backed by Merl Lindsay’s Oklahoma Night Riders is by JIM RAY: average ’50s country/honky tonk, main instruments being fiddles and steel. « A little too late » and « My heart belong to you » are on (# A-557).
Jim Ray, « My heart belongs to you » download
Jim Ray, « A little too late »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/hu-se-co-557-Jim-Ray-A-Little-Too-Late.mp3download

The third 1957 issue (if the « 57 » sequence has some sense) is a very nice country rocker by FLOYD ANDREWS, « Buy myself a rubber doll » (3-757), with strong guitar and steel to the fore. Floyd Andrews, « Buy myself a rubber doll » download

One issue by COWBOY (Charlie) HUFF escaped to my antennas, « Swingin’ alone tonite/Tulsa town waltz » (757). It’s the same man who had records in the Starday custom serie (»No two timin’ me »).

45-616-a (huff) cowboy huff No two timin' me
Cowboy Huff « No two timing’ me » download
And we nearly reached to the end of label with the 1958 issue by BILL & BINK ( with drummer Dwight), whose two-sided « Bed bug boogie/Do and don’t blues » (1358) could be described as primitive bluesy hillbilly/rockabilly.

Bill & Bink, « Bed bug boogie » download « Do and don’t blues » http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Bill-Bink-Do-And-Dont-Blues-Rockabilly-45.mp3download

hu-se-co 1-757A doyle madden (lindsay) gonna learn to rockhu-se-co 1-757B doyle madden (lindsay) tonights the night for love

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

huseco 557A Jim ray My heart belongs to youhuseco 557B jim Ray A little too late

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

huseco 757A Floyd Andrews Buy myself a rubber dollhuseco 1358A bill & bink bed bug boogiehuseco 1358B bill & bink do & don't blues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The indefatigable and faithful DRUNKENHOBO has found three more HU-SE-CO records! Thanks Dean.

A Bluegrass rockabilly flavored « If you’re after my heart » by the group RAMBLIN RASCALS on Hu-se-co. Flipside unheard « We both love the same girl ».
Ramblin Rascals « If you’re after my heart » download
Then WESLEY (Sleepy) MOORE and « Old mother Nature » (Hu-se-co 1257)(flip side « If you’d say you care ».
Wesley Moore « Old mother Nature »
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/HU-SE-CO-1057-Wesley-Sleepy-Moore-Old-Mother-Nature-...-56-Hillbilly-Bop.mp3download
Dean finally mentions a third disc by HURSHUL CLOTHIER, which proves untraceable. Clothier was an Oklahoma ace fiddler, backed by the Oklhahoma Travelers (founded 1953), who had « Will you please » on Hu-se-co 2-757.


hu-se-co 1057-A ramblin rascals if you're after my heart hu-se-co 1257-A wesley (sleepy) moore old mother nature

Richmond, KY. Burdette Land, owner of a microscopic label, Burdette Land, 1960.
nov 27th, 2013 by xavier

The Burdette Land label out of Richmond, KY, must have been one of the scarcest to the day: it  issued only two discs in 1960, although one was even reviewed (Pratt Bros.) in the August 29th, 1960 C&W edition of Billboard. So the promotion has surely have been correctly made, since NYC critics did get the record.

First issue was by HUBERT BARNARD (# 3000-1/2-A/B) and coupled one country side, « The man of the road » (partly written by Burdette Land), an unheard tune, and a more interesting side, « Boy She has gone« , rockabilly/rocker, which even found its way on a European compilation (« Hillbilly jukebox »).

burdette 3000-2-A Hubert barnard the man of the road
Hubert Barnard, « Boy she has gone » download burdette 3000-2-B hubert barnard boy she has gone

 

 

Second and last issue for the label was by the PRATT BROS. apparently Eugene (writer of both sides) and vocalist Vernis, backed for the rockabilly side by « The Rocking 5″. I  didn’t hear « Go find your love« , apparently a rocker, thus « The wind told me so » was average rural rockabilly. Hear them. And that was it. A really short affair in time.

Pratt Bros. & the Rocking 5, « The wind told me so » download

Burdette 30001-A Pratt Bros. Go find your loveburdette 300002 pratt bros. the wind told me so
Source: 45rpm.com, the Dan DeClark site for Ohio Valley records. Also RCS.

ALLSTAR Records, Houston Country – the first issues (1956-1960) of the main Dan Mechura’s (aka Daniel James) label
sept 27th, 2013 by xavier

Warning: I am experimenting html language, so to set the audio podcasts up beside their texts. This language isn’t that easy. Sorry for inconveniences!

james_daniel

Dan Mechura

Allstar Record Co.
1953: 3116 Garrow St., Houston TX
1958-1959: 2106 Orean Street, Houston 17, Texas
1960: Allstar Music Enterprises, 8029 Gulf Freeway, Houston 17, Texas
1961-1966: 1110 Washington, South Houston, Texas
also: Allstar Distributors
Allstar Records, a quasi-song-poem label with a slightly more plausible claim to legitimacy than most its song-sharking peers, was the brainchild of Houston country musician/ »singer » Daniel James Mechura. The ambitious Mechura started out as the frontman of a local outfit, the Sun Valley Playboys, enjoying one release on the Starday label (which they paid for themselves) in 1955. By that time, Dan had discovered the seedy underworld of songwriter’s clubs and, sensing an opportunity ripe for exploitation, soon began doing business as president of « The Folk Writers Co-Operative Association, » generously offering « every songwriter the help which is necessary to succeed in this competitive field, » as stated in one sales pitch. A record label of their own was the logical outgrowth of this « co-op. »

Read the rest of this entry »

DIXIE JAMBOREE: a small Nashville hillbilly label (1950-51)
juin 21st, 2013 by xavier

The Jamboree label

Bill Beasley had set up Tennessee records on a professionnal footing : it would be a union label, filing session details with the AFM for approval and paying union scales to the musicians Harold Bradley would bring in. Within a few months, Beasley realized that he could cut expenses for country and blues sessions by hiring non-union musicians, and in May 1950, the partners (Alan Bubis) founded another label that would focus on local country music talent. Another motive for the new subsidiary, Jamboree – although some labels (511 onwards) said « Dixie Jamboree » – was to test the waters in the « racking » market, selling cover versions of best-selling songs through grocery stores and other non-standard outlets that would accommodate a rack of records. A third factor is studio time, as Castle studio was not always available, so Bubis and Beasley recorded also in Bowling Green, Kentucky, at a radio station (engineered by Jim McKinney).

The first Jamboree artist, the prolific Dick Stratton, produced a classic product firmly in line with the Beasley/Bubis philosophy, the jukebox disc « Slippin’ around with Jole Blon », which referenced a number of popular records by stringing their titles together. A vocalist, bass-fiddle player and acoustic guitarist, Stratton led the house band on the live Hayloft Jamboree ((a minor-league radio barn dance, broadcast over WKDA Saturday afternoons from Nashville’s War Memorial auditorium), and soon led the studio band (« The Nite Owls ») on Tennessee/Jamboree’s country records. Stratton’s band was tight, swinging and accomplished with an ensemble sound, especially in the guitar parts (Harold Forrester or Boudleaux Bryant on fiddle, Alan Flatt or Bob Williams on guitar, Billy Byrd on steel or electric guitar and Roy Hall or Del Wood on piano). Beasley remembered that the two unsung stars of the band were the Neely Brothers, Mitch on fiddle and Paul on guitar.

Dick Stratton had also « Fat gal boogie » (# 501), the song’s subject matter may be insensitive by today’s standards, but let’s not forget that Merle Travis scored a hit in 1947 with « Fat gal ». Before he moved to the main Tennessee label at the end of 1951, Stratton recorded a mix of original novelty tunes (« Music City, U.S.A. ») and covers, notably « Poison love », previously a hit by Johnny & Jack. Stratton was an engagingly rough-hew, if limited, vocalist, and the backings were generic honky-tonk, driven by the tic-toc rhythm of the electric guitar’s deadened bass strings – the sort of fare that would have gone down well in the joints around Nashville. Another interesting novelty is « Music City, U.S.A. » (# 510), the first song in which Nashville was touted as such, although until then the city had a view of itself as the Athens of the South. It was written by Beasley, Ray Anderson and Stratton. Once again, the band excels.

 

 

 

Beasley signed another of the Nite Owls, Allen Flatt from Atlanta, for his startingly realistic impersonation of Ernest Tubb. By 1950, when Flatt first recorded for Jamboree (# 511), Tubb had established his base in Nashville, and was being imitated even more than ever. The twist this time comes from the fact that Tubb recorded « Steppin’ Out » after Flatt, making it a rare example of the prophet following the disciple. Flatt proves his mastery of Tubb’s commanding simplicity and lazy charm. The band had also mastered the trademark Texas Troubadour style. Allen Flatt occasionally played warm-up on Tubb’s local shows and possibly Ernest heard him sing this song about his unfaithful honky tonkin’ lady for years. The final Allen Flatt, « A broken heart and a glass of beer » (Jamboree 515) proves that he could even write Tubb-like songs. After leaving Jamboree/Tennessee/Republic, he went to Mercury, without hits. He died in 1988.

 

 

 

But Jamboree’s biggest hit came from another Hayloft Jamboree artist, John Talley. Born in 1924, he made his debut (# 509) with « Hillbilly sweetheart » and went on to make the first released version of Lefty Frizzell‘s signature tune « If you’ve got the money I’ve got the time », Jamboree Records’ biggest seller (# 514).

That Talley’s record was issued in August 1950, a month before Lefty’s own, was the happy result of the friendship Beasley and Bubis had cultivated with a D.J. In Chattanooga, who got prerelease records from the major labels. Although the Jamboree release caused Lefty bitter disappointment, Columbia used its clout to push his original to the top spot. Talley then went playing bass for Bill Monroe. In 1955, he had in his Minnesota band a young Dave Dudley on guitar before turning rockabilly on Mercury in 1956 ( « Wild mind »).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If Allen Fatt was a dimestore Ernest Tubb, then Ray Anderson was the dimestore Hank Williams at this stage in his career. He had first « You’re the two-timing kind » (# 504) : this was a pretty much undiluted Hank from the flashes of falsetto at the end of a line to the walking 2/4 bass and the tic-toc rhythm on the electric guitar. On the second, « I’m lonely because » (# 513), the steel hadn’t quite the bite or incisiveness of Don Helms, but it wasn’t unlike Hank to invoke divine retribution on a woman who’s done wrong. The flip side was a Korean War era novelty (« Draft board blues ») that was shaped after some of Hank’s blues.

After that, Anderson recorded for Cozy, Kentucky (« Stalin kicked the bucket »), Mountaineer in 1955, then Admiral in 1957 for a couple of rockabilly tunes. Finally Starday in 1958, before playing bass for the Osborne Brothers, and turning to religion in 1962.

Jamboree 516 had Shorty Ashburn, « You’re under arrest », co-written by Autry Inman. Indeed it would be a prophetic song for Inman, who foud himself under arrest in 1972 for bootlegging records. Ashburn had previously recorded for Bullet (« Triflin’ Woman »), and that’s all is known about him.

Hugh Cherry’s main claim, beside being a country D.J., is to have recorded the second worst record of these years in Nashville (he couldn’t sing), the first being Audrey Williams’, Hank’s wife.

Roy Justice (# 502) is unheard and went unnoticed.

Jamboree ceased activities circa mid-1951, when McKinney and Bubis/Beasley went separate ways, and that Bubis had some troubles with nonunion sessions and the AFM. He then founded Tennessee (see elsewhere in this site).

 

                                                         Article based on Martin Hawkins’ « A shot in the dark » book, as well as « Tennessee Jive » booklet. 

 

501 Dick Stratton Slippin’ around with Jole Blond Fat gal boogie
502 Roy Justice Bonaparte’s retreat Like sand through my fingers
503 Dick Stratton Rainbow Whistlin’ Rufus
504 Ray Anderson You’re the two timin’ kind You’d better hold your tongue
505-507 unknown
508 Alan Flatt It’s all over now Watching my past go by
509 John Talley Hillbilly swetheart Tears falling from your eyes
510 Dick Stratton Music City, U.S.A. It’ll be a cold day in July
511 Alan Flatt I’m movin’ on Steppin’ out
512 Hugh Cherry Rocking horse Walk, chicken, walk
513 Ray Anderson Draft board blues I’m lonely because
514 John Talley If you’ve got the money I’ve got the time The price of a broken heart
515 Alan Flatt Scrapbook of dreams A broken heart and a glass of beer
516 Shorty Ashburn You’re under arrest My last farewell
517 Dick Stratton I wouldn’t have you on a Christmas tree Poison love

 

 

A small Kentucky label: DIXIANA (1953)
juin 19th, 2013 by xavier

The Kentucky based DIXIANA label was a short lived concern, maybe operating from Bowling Green (Warren County). Launched in 1953, the label appears to have only lasted 6 months or so. However, during that relatively short time, the owners released some first rate Hillbilly, some of which can be found on various White Label « Boppin’ Hillbilly » albums.

Kentucky and Warren Cty

 

 

 

 

 

100.

 

101.

 

 

102. Southern Harmony Boys – Hattie Mae Fleming (piano)

That great mansion DA 12

The Lord and I DA 13

103. The Renfro Brothers and the Valley Sta. Playboys

Ever ready (BH 2821) no mtx

Just over a girl (BH 2821) no mtx

Both tracks are superior hillbilly boppers. Very fast tracks, over assured vocals. Backing is superb : sawing fiddle, steel, piano, even an accordion solo. The « Girl » side reminds me of the Carlisles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

104. Odis Blanton and his Blue Star Rangers

Steppin’ High Wide and Handsome (BH 2807) no mtx

Don’t move the moon no mtx

Both sides are superior Hillbilly boppers too. Over a fast fiddle routine, an assured vocal is backed by accordion, steel and piano. The « Moon » side is an excellent medium rock-a-ballad, with the piano well to the fore.

Back in early 1953, WLBJ out of Bowling Green, Kentucky was featuring the Blue Star Rangers. Their leader Odis Blanton was a D.J. at this station, airing daily.

Odis and Hugh would handle the vocal turns as solos. When they did their trio numbers, it usually included John, Gene and Odis.

The Blue Star Rangers had a 45-minute show that aired every day except Sunday over WLBJ called « The Farm And Home Hour ». They also did the usual personal appearances throughout the area of western Kentucky and northern Tennessee, including stage shows and square dance engagements.

Group Members included:

Odis Blanton, leader and manager, rhythm guitar

John Blanton, steel guitar

Gene Kitchens, violin

Hugh Poteet, bass

« Pappy » Jones, saxophone

Gwen Dalton, piano (she had several records on her own on Republic)

105. Cliff Gross and his Texas Cowboys

Hog pen hop (BH 2822) no mtx

Smokin’ and jokin’ (and pokin’ along) no mtx

I only heard « Hop » side : a fine hillbilly boogie, sort of talking blues, with the band singing the refrain in unison. Western swing overtones. The side had surely been recorded in Dallas (Jim Beck’s studio), even « Beck » co-written. Gross was a mountain style fiddler, who had played as early as 1929 with the Hi-Flyers, then in 1932 with the Light Crust Doughboys.

 

106. Jack Bybee and the Rhythm Wranglers

Drifting down the stream    no mtx  

?

(N.B. This label shot was unearthed by Drunken Hobo. Thanks to him)

 

107. Jimmy Smith

Does he love you no mtx

It ain’t no fun to say I told you so no mtx

Nothing is known about this fine singer. I only heard « Does he love you », which is a fine heavy rockaballad, again over accordion, fiddle and piano accompaniment. Smith (according it’s the same person) has an excellent « First choice » – very fine guitar picking – on Cactus « Rockin’ Hillbilly » vol. 1 (included here).

One then can wonder if the backing members are not the same at least for the known sides.

 

based on Hillbilly Researcher # 13 issue (mid-1990s). Additional research and comprehensive musical appreciation by Bopping editor.

The Sun-Ray label: Kentucky ’60s Country-rock (1967-69)
déc 3rd, 2012 by xavier

A man by the name of James T. Price was responsible for creating the Sun-Ray record company ; in fact, the vast majority of the songs put out on the label was published through Jimmy Price Music Pub. In 1961, Price issued a modern Hawaiian steel guitar course with tablatures: he had at least one release on the label. Bud Chowning, who would later record for Sun-Ray, says that Price had converted his garage into a recording studio and printing space with printing equipment : ‘He had a piano in there and a lot of mikes. The recording room was sound proof’. Read the rest of this entry »

Starday custom 651-675 (July-October 1957): 7th part
oct 12th, 2012 by xavier

Since Malcolm Chapman did suspend some time in 2011 his study on Starday custom in his excellent blogsite, all we have is a short survey of records I did hear.

COWTOWN RECORDS 651   HARRY PEPPEL and the Shenandoah Valley Rangers  Vocals by Alice Brammer

 

         

Po Box 1694, Fort Worth, TX                            Jul 57  (Billboard Review on 15th August 1957)

 

45-651-A – No Baby No

(M.L. Miller / J.W. Stephenson)   (***)

45-651-B – Take A Letter, Mr. Moon

(M.L. Miller / J.W. Stephenson)   (***)

 

STARDAY RECORDS 652    LITTLE JODY RAINWATER and the Jamboree Gang


 

45-652-A – I Broke My Heart Waltzing           

(C Johnson / V Graves)   (Starrite BMI)

45-652-B – The Man That Wrote Home Sweet Home 

                                (Never Was A Married Man)

(None listed)   (Starrite BMI)

A lively fast hillbilly bopper, nice guitar. Short steel solo.

BMI Clearance on 27th September 1957.

PEACH RECORDS 653             RAMBLIN’ RED BAILEY

PO Box 111, Jefferson, GA.

Aug 57


45-653-A – The Hardest Fall

(Kenneth Bailey)   (Starrite BMI)

45-653-B – You’ve Always Got A Frown

(Kenneth Bailey)   (Starrite BMI)

BMI Clearance on 11th October 1957.

 

BLUE RIDGE RECORDS 654

Aug 57

BLUE RIDGE QUARTET

House Of God

(No info)   (No info)

Footprint Of Jesus

(No info)   (No info)

Tenderly He Watches Over Me

(No info)   (No info)

Where Shall I Be On That Judgement Day

(No info)   (No info)

 

STARDUST RECORDS 655

1206 West Joseph St, Perryville, MO.

Aug 57

CHANDOS McRILL and the Perryville Melody Boys

45-655-A – Money Lovin’ Woman

( C McRill / E LaHomme)   (Starrite BMI)

45-655-B – Little Bit Too Bashful

(C McRill / E LaHomme)   (Starrite BMI)

BMI Clearance on 11th October 1957.

Fantastic hick vocal double-sider. Side A is focused on guitar sounding like a steel; B side has

sewing fiddle all along, even a nice solo. A must!

 

PEACH RECORDS 656

606 Pierre Ave, Shreveport, LA

Aug 57

PETE AND PEACHES HARDIN

45-656-A – Ho’Bo’s Heaven

(Hardin)   (Starrite BMI)

45-656-B – I’ve Wasted My Love On You

(Hardin)   (Starrite BMI)

BMI Clearance on 11th October 1957.

 

STARDAY RECORDS 657

Aug 57

LOU WALKER

45-657-A – Rock and Roll (Tennessee Style) :Falls into the white rock category, with a nice saxophone (solo) and a wild guitar.

(Walker)   (Starrite BMI)

45-657-B – I’ll Always Be In Love With You

(Walker)  (Starrite BMI)

BMI Clearance on 11th October 1957.

 

STARDAY RECORDS 658

Aug 57

ROCKING MARTIN

45-658-A – All Because Of You: Lively side, is Martin really Red Smith? I also hears he was Bob Newman.

(Red Smith)   (Starrite BMI)

45-658-B – Do You Still Love Me

(Red Smith)   (Starrite BMI)

BMI Clearance on 11th October 1957.

 

 

STARDAY RECORDS 659

Aug 57

HOYT SCOGGINS – Curley Bingham and Band

45-659-A – Waiting For An Answer

(James Backley)   (Starrite BMI)

45-659-B – One Heart, One Love

(H Scoggins / O. Milsap)   (Starrite BMI)

BMI Clearance on 25th October 1957.

A-side: a lively banjo led bluegrass number. Two nice fiddle solos.

 

STARDAY RECORDS 660

Aug 57

LEON HOLMES

45-660-A Half A Chance : a lively side. Strong guitar.

(Leon Holmes)   (Starrite BMI)

45-660-B Lost Love

(Leon Holmes)   (Starrite BMI)

BMI Clearance on 25th October 1957.

 

STARDAY RECORDS 661

Sept 57

HARRY HOLUNGOR

661-A – Baby

(No info)   (No info)

661-B – Tell Me

(No info)   (No info)

 

DIXIE RECORDS 662

WBVI, Barberville, KY

Sept 57

DAVID LUNDY / ORANGIE RAY HUBBARD

45-662-A – If I Had A Nickel For Every Time You’re Untrue

(David Lundy)   (Starrite BMI)

45-662-B – Sweet Love: a fabulous version of the Jimmy & Johnny/Johnny Burnette’s « Sweet love On My Mind ». Strong vocal, wild guitar. A must. Hubbard was also on Lee (Cincinnati)

(Ray Hubbard)   (Starrite BMI)

BMI Clearance on 15th November 1957.

 

STARDAY RECORDS 663

Sept 57

BILL FLOYD – music by the Swingsters

663-A – Hey Boy: a very fine shuffling hillbilly bop: fiddle and guiar (solo) over a relaxed vocal

(No info)   (No info)

663-B – Heartbreak

(No info)   (No info)

Billboard review on 14th October 1957.

 

 

STARFIRE 664 BILLY MATCH and the Starfires

Orlando, FL September 1957

I Want My Baby: fine white rock with chorus (doo wop influenced). Remember Jerry Arnold’s « Race For Time ». Very solid.

Girl Of Mine

This artist was actually Billy J. Killen

 

SHOTT 665 HERBIE SHOTT

Van Wert, OH September 1957

You’ll Cry Tomorrow / A Tip From A Fool

 

DIAMOND 666 GENE HARPER and his Saddle Pals

MO.

Thank The Lord For The Rain / Jesus Is A Friend To Me

 

VENUS 667 LUKE McDANIEL

Pritchard, AL. September 1957

You’re Still On My Mind (McDaniel): an average slow ballad by the « Whoa Boy » man.

Homeward Mule (McDaniel): fast folkish number

STARDAY 668 LARRY NOLEN and the Bandits

Blue River

King Of The Ducktail Cats: topical lyrics. Great guitar. A must!

also on Sarg (see elsewhere in this site)

 

STARDAY 669 DANNY BROCKMAN and his Twilight Ramblers

Foolish Pride (Bailey-Kaiser)

Feel Sorry For Me (Jimmy Logsdon) : urgent vocal over a very good backing (guitar, steel). Uptempo. A great track

 

STARDAY 670 JOYCE LOVE with Curley Sanders and his Santones

Why Did You Leave Me (Sanders-Shirley-Sprowls)

Peace Of Mind (Love): a fabulous bluesy ballad. Welcome female strong voice. A nice guitar.

STARDUST 671 LEE VOORHIES and his Ozark Country Boys

Kansas City, MO. October 1957

Load Up My Blues (Voorhies): uptempo song. Fantastic hick vocal, nice guitar. A must! Similar to Westport sides (see elsewhere in this site the Westport label story)

Hand In Hand (Voorhies)

This artist also recorded as Lee Finn on Westport Records.

 

CORVETTE 672 JOHNNY SKILES with the Harmony Ranch Hands

Portland, OR.

The Twinkle In Your Eyes (Johnny Skiles): avery fine uptempo rockaballad, atmospheric – lot of steel. Skiles had other fine records on Rural Rhythm, Romac.

Ghost Of My Lonely Past (Johnny Skiles): « ghost » song – steel for good effect.

 

STARDAY 673 BILLIE & GORDON HAMRICK with Red Farrell

Cruel Jealous Heart (Nell Palmer)

Gypsy Waltz (Nell Palmer)

 

STARDAY 674 FRANK EVANS and his Top Notchers

I Got A Patent (On My Kind Of Love)(Jimmy Dunkin)

Lonesome Love (Bonnie Burke)

 

STARDAY 675 : no details

Excel & Rodeo: « The friendly record ». Hillbilly bop and Rockabilly in Los Angeles (1954-1960)
oct 11th, 2012 by xavier

 

Founded at 1354, Wright Street, LA, California, in 1954. It is believed by Hillbilly Researcher Al Turner that the label was possibly owned by George Wilson, who wrote or co-wrote most of the material used by both Excel and Rodeo. He would have made a small fortune in royalties from writing « Hot Rod Race » for Arkie Shibley in 1951 (see elsewhere in the site for his story), certainly enough to put into a small record company. Read the rest of this entry »

A Starday subsidiary label in Music City: the NASHVILLE label (1960-1965) – many Starday custom artists! modern Hillbilly bop
sept 5th, 2012 by xavier

After Lonnie Irving‘s 1960 success with « Pinball Machine » (Starday 486) – staying on the charts for four months, reaching Billboard’s # 13 spot -, Don Pierce realized that a lot of the custom material sent in to Starday had strong commercial potential, so he decided to set up a label that would serve as a cross between the Starday custom serie (which lasted until # 1186) and the main series. Shortly after the success of the success of « Pinball Machine » in the summer of 1961, Pierce founded a subsidiary label, Nashville Records. Just as they had a custom service, artists would generally pay for their own studio sessions. But as was the norm for the his Starday productions, Pierce would usually pay for the pressing, shipping, and promotion. The goal was to establish another successful line of singles that, similar to the rock’n'roll label Dixie, could be shopped around on a local level. Read the rest of this entry »

Central City, KY: the SUMMIT label (+ Royce) – 1958-1960
août 2nd, 2012 by xavier

Since 1955, Central City’s WMTA radio showcased every Saturday night a live show named « The Saturday Jamboree« . Among the performers Royce Morgan can be found ; also Eddie Gaines from White Plains, Billy Harlan (the « I wanna bop » cat) on double-bass – in the late 50′s he also worked as disc-jockey on WMTA and WNES. Also Tag and Effie Willoughby, and Jimmy Piper. Read the rest of this entry »

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