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Roy King, yodeler in Detroit and Chicago (1949-51)
juil 28th, 2014 by xavier

photoRoy King is a completely unknown artist from the very early ’50s, who acted in Illinois (Peoria, WWXL), and whom about anything is unknown today about. London16031 roy king freight train blues 

London 16031B roy king everybody knewLondon 16049B roy king new tennessee babyLondon16049 roy king mule skinner blues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

« Yodelin’ way up there » download

 

« Rambling » download

He had a string of releases, probably cut in Detroit, MI, or Chicago, on the London and Mercury labels between 1949 and 1951, and disappeared after this year. He was billed as a yodeler, and eventually yodeled a lot throughout his records, « Yodelin’ way up there » or « Yodelin’ polka ». He was backed by a regional outfit, Hal Fuller’s Tennessee Ho-Downers, usual guitar, bass, fiddle, and steel. Billboard cited him as a promising artist between April and October 1951, although there were no hits. He used to sing old favorites, as Jimmie Rodgers ’s « Mule skinner blues », Roy Acuff’s « Freight train blues », a fine hillbilly shuffler, « Rambling » or old-timey songs like « St. James infirmary ». His voice is always smooth, a lead guitar is well to the fore, but the whole thing is certainly not hillbilly boogie, although nice yodeling songs. Indeed his style is similar to that of Kenny Roberts.

mercury 6338B yodelin'Mercury6401 roy king st. james infirmary

Any help to document this artist would be welcome!

As usual, Ronald Keppner’s help was indispensable. Thanks Ronald. Also Peter Mohr of Switzerland for the disco and support.
« Freight train blues« download

« Mule skinner blues« download

 

 

 

 

 

Roy King-Billboard-Aug-51

Earl Aycock, ex- »George & Earl » (1956-1958)
jan 28th, 2014 by xavier

aycock_earlEarl Aycock was born in 1930 in Meridian, the hometown of the « Father of Country Music  » Jimmie Rodgers . He started his career as a disc jockey, before that he joined the U.S. Air Force in 1951 and he played in Bill Nettles’ band as bassist. With Nettles he made also his first recordings , when he was cast on the famous « Hadacol Boogie » .

After Aycock was released from the Air Force, he returned to Meridian. In 1954, he played with Martha Carson in Birmingham, Alabama. Shortly after been received quickly found in Nashville, Tennessee, back where he accompanied Carson at sessions for Capitol Records and RCA Victor,he appeared with her at the Grand Ole Opry and toured with Bill Carlisle, Hank Snow and Elvis Presley and took over the function of emcee . Aycock was the first musician in the Opry in 1955 with an electrically amplified bass.

In Martha Carson’s band , another young musician played named George McCormick . Soon Aycock became friends with McCormick and the two formed the duo George and Earl . By 1956, both musicians took on for three Mercury Records singles but none of them were hits , despite promising sales figures. After the release of their last record in April 1956 Aycock left Nashville and moved his work to Houston, Texas, where he was drawn in 1955 with his wife.

In Houston, he had received a lucrative offer and was active as the frontman of his own band as well as a disc jockey. In 1957, he also worked for Starday Records’ Hillbilly Hit Parade for a number of uncredited sides. In the spring of 1958 he appeared at Allstar Records with his first solo single « The Love That Thrills / Magic Words » . By the end of the 1950s he brought Bill Will Bourne to D Records and also wrote for Claude Gray « Letter Overdue » . 1958 Aycock moved back to Meridian , worked until 1959 and still when KRCT in Baytown , Texas.

In Meridian Aycock worked in the 1960s, continued in radio and television before he left the music scene and went into the insurance business.

From Wikipedia with some corrections and additions. Thanks to Tony Biggs.

 

dixie 508A earl aycock I want you I need you I love youSans titre-1

« I want you, I need you, I love you » (Dixie 508), uncredited) download

dixie 516B earl aycock turn her downdixie 519-B earl aycock The same two lips

« Turn her down » (Dixie 516, uncredited) download

« The same two lips » (Dixie 519, uncredited) download

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dixie 520a earl aycock I_m coming homeallstar 7164-b earl aycock the love that thrills detearl aycock2

« Im coming home » (Dixie 520, uncredited) download
« The love that thrills » (Allstar)
http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/allstar-7164-aycock_earl_thelovethatthrills1.mp3download

« (Help me lose the) Boogie Woogie blues »: the short recording story of BOBBY SOOTS (1950-51)
nov 26th, 2013 by xavier

BB 28:1:51 Mercury 6326

Billboard April 28, 1951

bobby soots? (gene krupa)

 

 

 

 

 

Very little is known about Bobby Soots, except what is contained in a Tampa newspaper snippet dated Nov. 2, 1950. He was born in Alabama during the ’20s, took up the guitar when he was twelve and had his first band, the Red Wagon Boys, entertaining a local radio show in 1938. He then moved to Chicago to sing Hillbilly in the clubs, when the famous jazz drummer and bandleader Gene Krupa noticed and hired him as featured vocalist. Soots had a strong baritone voice, and Krupa used him on New York sessions for C&W tunes like Pee Wee King‘s « Bonaparte’s retreat » (June 1950), « Panhandle rag », « At the jazz band ball » or « Walking with the blues », to name just a few classic Krupa jazz sides.

 

A year later, free from his contract with Gene Krupa, Bobby Soots went solo for two sessions for Mercury records, apparently cut in Chicago. Eight tracks were recorded circa February/March 1951, whose only four were released, leaving unissued a promising « Fiddle boogie ». Among the issued tunes were Amos Milburn’s « Bad, bad whiskey » (Mercury 6326), and most of all, the immortal « (Help me lose the) Boogie woogie blues » (great steel solo!), often reissued (Mercury 6331). B-sides are less interesting, « I’m crying » and «Have you forgotten my name ». Soots did not write his own material. After these two issues, one loses his trail, and he seems to have disappeared afterwards.

BB 2 nov 50 bobby soots-krupa ret

rca 20-3766-A gene krupa bonaparte's retreat Gene Krupa (Bobby Soots, vocalist) « At the jazz band ball » download RCA 20-3816-A gene krupa at the jazz and hall ret

Gene Krupa (Bobby Soots, vocalist) « Walking with the blues » <a href= »http://www.bopping.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Vicor-Bobby-Soots-Walking-with-the-blues.mp3″ target= »_blank »>download
rca 3965 gene krupa walking with the blues

Gene Krupa (Bobby Soots, vocalist), « Panhandle rag » download

mercury 6326 bobby soots whiskey ret
Bobby Soots, « Bad, bad whiskey » (Mercury 6326) download

Bobby Soots, « (Help me lose the) Boogie woogie blues » (Mercury 6331) download
mercury 6331 bobby soots boogie woogie blues

Bobby Soots, « I’m crying » download

Bobby Soots, « Have you forgotten my name » download

 

 

 

 

Bobby Soots solo discography:

(vo) with instrumental accompaniment: g, rh. g, p, steel, str.b.. Poss. Chicago, circa Feb. 1951

7208      Bad, bad whiskey                                      Mercury 6326

7209      Fiddle boogie                                              unissued

7210      I’m cryin’                                                     Mercury 6326

7211       A thousand times too many                   unissued

 

(vo) with fiddle, piano, rh. gtr, g, steel, str.b.  circa September/october 1951

7232     Help me lose the boogie boogie blues  Mercuy 6331

7233    Goin’, goin’, gone                                       unissued

7234   Lots of nothin’                                                  -

7235   Have you forgotten my name                   Mercury 6331

 

Source: Internet for the Gene Krupa records, Bobby Soots photograph and Billboard snippets. Thanks to Ronald Keppner for scan/mp3 of Mercury 6326. Discographical details from Michel Ruppli’s « Mercury label » vol. 1.

Bobby Grove, Ohio hillbilly (1954-1957): Kentucky, Audio Lab, King, Lucky labels.
août 11th, 2013 by xavier

Born Bobby Musgrove in 1932. No biographical data have been gathered except those skin-deep, D.J.s only biographical facts on the « not for sale » King issues.

His career began under his real name on the Kentucky label with with « Dollar sign heart » (#584) in 1954, when he returned from U.S. Army. It’s a very nice hillbilly bopper, pushed by a fine guitar. A very rare issue on the Audio Lab label, seemingly a part of the Carl Burkhardt’s empire of Kentucky/Gateway/4 Big hits cheap labels: Grove had an EP (thanks to Allan Turner to have unearthed and shared this scarce issue) of 4 tracks, one being penned by Walter Scott of « I’m walking out » (Ruby 100) fame. In 1956, he dropped his name to « Grove » on the King label, where he cut 4 records, all of whom are good hillbillies, the best are « No parking here » (# 4946), and the echoey (fast, almost rockabilly) « Whistle of the gravy train » (# 5007). Also worth of hearing: « I saw here first » (# 5027). He’d redone his Kentucky tune as « Dollar sign« . During the latter part of 1957 he had his last single on the Cincinnati new label Lucky, # 003 « Jealous dreams/Be still, my heart« . Again two fine bopping sides.

Bobby Grove reappeared later in 1962 as minister and cut many religious albums with much success (several shots on YouTube). That’s all I know about him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1963 issue of a 1956 track

 

 

With thanks to Allan Turner and John Burton for the loan of rare label scans and mp3, the others taken from the web.

 

Bashful Vic Thomas: « Rock and roll tonight »- hillbilly-rock 1952-1961
juil 15th, 2013 by xavier

Very little is known about this Texas artist, except the information on labels and two comments after his solitary 1952-53 issue as published by Andrew Brown’s « wired-for-sound.blogspot » site.

« Ramblin’ Fool » is a Gold Star pressing, dating from around 1952-53. Glen Barber, whose band provides the music here, was probably still a student at Pasadena High School when he cut this. The steel guitarist is « Dusty » Carroll, and the fiddler is Charlie Frost. Musically, this is far from great, but hey, it’s a group of teen-agers. Cut them some slack. Flipside « Let me show us how » is an uptempo weeper. Young Glen Barber is invited to do his (very tame) solo.

 

 

In 1956 for a label of the same name (Premium 344), Bashful Vic Thomas (note his entire name) had « Rock and roll tonight« , a prime example of a country band thinking that they could jump on the rock and roll bandwagon by simply writing a song that had the words « rock and roll » in the lyrics — leaving the steel and fiddle intact. I suspect that teenagers at the time weren’t impressed, but the honky-tonkers probably thought they were being « hip » by dancing to it. Flipside is Hank Williams‘ « You’re gonna change (or I’m gonna leave », well done and very fast in the Thomas manner – copyrights go to Thomas. Actually « You’re gonna change » sound like an entirely new song and I wonder if Thomas only got the tune’s title from Hank.

 

Bashful Vic lived up to his name — I’ve never heard anyone on the Houston ’50s scene mention him at all. After re-cutting « Ramblin’ Fool » for Applause, an Omaha, Nebraska label in 1960, he disappears from the vinyl map completely except for the Memory 45. Flipside of the Applause 45 was a modern and energetic (for the times being) revamp of his 1956 « You’re gonna change« .

 

 

The Memory 45 is from 1961, and originate from Chula Vista, California, a fact which indicate Vic Thomas was a well traveled artist. It’s a Starday custom double sider of lovely but forgettable country ballads, « A fool in love » and « I wonder« . Thanks to Allan Turner to have provided the label scans as well as sound files. Vic Thomas later in his life moved to Florida and eventually was committed to an asylum for his depression. Originally from New York City, Vic was attracted to the sweet sounds of West Texas troubadors and aspired to be one himself.

It is almost certain that the Vic Thomas of « Marianne » fame, a white doo-wop song from 1963-64 on Philips, is a completely different artist.

Notes and sources: Boppin’ hillbilly Vol. 2002 and 2022 for short snippets on Vic Thomas. Comments on Premium 101 « Ramblin’ fool » on Andrew Brown’s « Wired-for-sound » bloodspot. Thanks to Allan Turner for providing rare scans and sound files. Music and scans of Applause from somelocalloser bloodspot (2013).

Black Jack Wayne, Bay Area Country-rock (1957-1960)
mai 10th, 2013 by xavier

Black Jack Wayne

Born: February 8, 1923

Died: June 30, 1999

California Hayride

KEEN San Jose, CA

KVSM San Mateo, CA

Along the way, we’ll find artists who cause some discussion back and forth or even some debate. No, not about their music, but about the details of their career. We’ve already seen some discussion on this fellow in an exchange of emails. But, somehow we stumbled across an issue of Cowboy Songs from December 1957 that had a column written by Imogene Ellwanger who provides some tidbits. And a few other mentions elsewhere, too.

It has proven difficult to find something other than this short biography taken from hillbilly-music.com site. Black Jack Wayne (real last name  : Shults) was a native of Oklahoma who moved to the San Francisco Bay Area when he was 14. He started guitar playing as a hobby but later on down the road, it became part of his career. He had an injury of some type and came back to the Bay Area and decided to join his brother’s band, the « Rattlesnake Ramblers ».

In 1950 he and his younger brother Chuck «  Charles  » bought the «  Garden of Allah  » nightclub, located in Niles, north of Hayward-Oakland Highway. They hired country artist Ed Cima to transform the Garden by painting cartoon cowboys and western scenes in a whimsical mural over the walls. He also hand painted the ceiling to look like the Taj Mahal. They tried to change the name but people wouldn’t accept it, so it remained the Garden of Allah.?In its heyday, the Garden catered to rock and roll fans on Friday nights, country western lovers on Saturdays and square dancers on Sundays. In mid-1956, he had three daily shows over the all-western radio station KVSM out of San Mateo, California. And a one hour show over television station KOVR with the « Bar 10 Ranch Boys ».

Black Jack and the Bar-10 Ranch Boys had several recordings in 1954 on the Cavalier label. Back then their latest release was « A Dream Just Won’t Do » along with « Nip or Two » (# 839) or Jack’s brother Chuck Wayne‘s «  Mean Mean Mean  » (# 836). The latter seems to be the Bud Hobbs song.

Later on in her column, Ms. Ellwanger mentions that KOVR, Channel 13 in Stockton, had two Western music shows on the air. One show had Glenn Stepp and his band. The other had Black Jack Wayne and his « Bar 11 Ranch Boys ». Black Jack had also started a live radio show from the Garden of Allah nightclub he owned that was broadcast over KEEN every Saturday night. She also wrote that there was a possibility that the « California Hayride » might start a show originating from the Garden of Allah every Friday night over Channel 13 in Stockton.

In 1955 on the Spur label we found Charles (Chuck) Wayne for two solid Hardrock Gunter type hillbilly rockers (hillbilly bop with a dose of western swing), «  Rockin’ Rollin’ Rhythm  » and « Rodeo Time Is Here  » # 1245), and maybe more with «  The Golden Key  » (# 1248).

In 1957, per a column in Cowboy Songs by Imogene Chapman, we find that Black Jack had his own record label – Black Jack. And around that time, had put out his first recording, « Time Stole My Empire » b/w « Shallow Water Blues »  : the latter being a strong fast bluesy number. Tom Hall and Terry Fell helped on the record with their guitar and harmonica. At the time, they mentioned that you could order the record from Black Jack in care of radio station KVSM in San Mateo, California. No coincidence that Ms. Chapman might mention Black Jack, for in the same issue featuring « Stars on the Horizon », she is listed as the president of his ‘fast-growing’ and ‘real-active’ fan club.

Later on, we found a mention on Channel 2, KTVU, now of the Fox Network, on the Bayinsider.com… « Not all of KTVU’s local programming was noteworthy or long-lasting. There was The Black Jack Wayne Show, a western variety show… »

 

 

 

In the KVSM studio (San Mateo), Black Jack Wayne cut in 1957 his next record « What Makes Me Hang Around  » and backed Rose and Cal Maddox on «  Gotta Travel On  »  (Black Jack 104). Medium honky tonk (nice guitar), with Jack vocally fronting, backed on chorus by Rose. His cooperation with the Maddoxes led him to offer them «  Ugly & Slouchy  » (Columbia 40836)

In 1959 Chuck Wayne had «  Wishing/Thank You Call Again  » on Ozark 963, both pop country. Incidentally the latter was written by two comperes of the Rural Rhythm days, Johnny O’Neal and Johnny Tyler. Black Jack Wayne and the Roving Gamblers backed Bill Carter on «  Baby Brother  ». B-side, «  Ride, Gunman, Ride  », was a Jack Wayne original. Chuck Wayne had his last known recordings in 1959 on Black Jack 106 with «  I’m Sending You Some Roses  /Blue Moon Waltz  » (untraced record).

Black Jack Wayne had several interesting records on Cheyenne, among them «  Dancing With A Stranger  » (# 114) in 1960, before a couple on Big West and a solitary issue in 1962 on Decca. Charles Wayne also backed Mel Dorsey («  Little Lil  » rocker) on Black Jack.

sources: main source was « hillbilly-music.com » site. Many Youtube label shots. And a lot of research! I am not THAT satisfied with this article.

Cowboy Jack Derrick, « Truck Drivin’ Man » (Texas, also Louisiana, 1946-1957)
mai 10th, 2013 by xavier

We don’t know anything about Jack Derrick’s early life. He seems to have emanated from Texas in 1921, and he began recording as early as 1946 in a sparse honky tonk (mainly guitars) instrumentation for King. This label did issue on both main serie as well as on Deluxe and Federal the result of 12 songs two sessions. Best tunes are one « Truck Drivin’ Man » , « Got Worried Blues In My Mind », « I Want A Woman (That Can Cook »  or « Triflin’ Baby ». I don’t know if any tune did meet the success, although « Truck Drivin’ Man » remains as a minor classic : it even has been re-recorded in the early ’60s on a « trucker » LP (# 866 « Truck Drivers Songs »). Another curiosity is the line in the song: « 

« When my truck drivin’ man comes into town

 

I’ll dress up in my silken gown »

So Derrick was ahead of his time with a gay trucker song.

 

Later on we find Derrick on a solitary Majestic issue of 1950-51. Why he appeared on this West coast label is unknown. « Can’t Find The Keyhole » is of course a drunken song.

Derrick also had issues on the Clifton and Eagle labels (untraced) during the early 50s. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back in 1955, Cowboy Jack Derrick was working at KNUZ in Houston, Texas. He hosted a show called the « KNUZ Corral » each day from 11:00am to 1:25pm, Monday through Saturday.??On Saturday night, he would sing and do comedy as well as part of the KNUZ Saturday Night Jamboree. To finish off his weekends of personal appearances, he performed at the Magnolia Gardens on Sundays where they did outdoor shows.??In late 1954, Biff Collie and Jack wrote Martha Ferguson of Pickin’ and Singin’ News that they had a ‘homecoming’ type of show lined up for their Christmas Jamboree show over KNUZ. Texas Bill Strength and Arlie Duff were to make appearances.??In May of 1955, we note that Jack wrote a letter of encouragement to the new publication, Country & Western Jamboree to help disc jockeys like himself keep up on the news.??In the summer of 1955, Jack wrote one of those regional roundup columns and gave us some insight into the KNUZ Saturday Night Jamboree show. It was held at the City auditorium and broadcast every Saturday night from 8:00 pm to 11:00 pm. At that time, he told readers some of the members of their cast were Link Davis, Sonny Burns, Floyd Tillman, and, Burt and Charley. The show would also include guest appearances by other acts who were probably making appearances in the area and included such names as Red Foley, Tex Ritter, Eddie Dean, T. Texas Tyler, Tommy Collins and Jimmie Davis. He also told readers of another Jamboree show that he had learned about when he visited with the show’s organizer, Hank Jones over in Hammond, Louisiana. That show, The Southeastern Jamboree was held on Saturday nights at the Reimers Auditorium in Hammond.??

Finally he had two interesting boppers in 1955-57. One is on Starday (# 205) , « Waitin’ and Watchin’ », which is fine. Even better is the very first Longhorn issue « Black Mail », full of energy and happiness (# 501). After that Derrick disappears at least from the recording scene : only one more picture shows him in 1960 with Hal Harris.

 

Note. Drunken Hobo pointed out the two versions of « Truck Driving Man », which had escaped me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

credits: Allan Turner for Federal and True-Tone (South Africa pressing) scans. Hillbilly Researcher for Majestic issue. « HillbillyBoogie1″ (You tube) for the mid-50s bio details.Various sources (also own collection) for the rest. Comments welcome!

Rockin’ Rudy Hansen: « Saturday Jump » – Rockabilly, also pop country (1954-58)
jan 13th, 2013 by xavier

Not much is known about Rudy Hansen, except that he was raised on a farm in New York (unknown date of birth). Later on, he was one of the stars appearing on the WLA’s Midwestern Jamboree, aired every saturday from Cincinati, Oh. Inspired by the Shreveport-based Louisiana Hayride, the show was originally called Boone County Jamboree (named for nearby Boone County in Northern Kentucky). Midwestern Hayride was first broadcast before 1937 and was carried live on the radio each Saturday evening through the early 1970s.

WLW television came on the air in 1948, sharing larger quarters with WLW-AM in the former Elks Building, re-christened Crosley Square. It eventually became the originating studio for the regional network Avco Broadcasting Corporation, which included WLW-A in Atlanta, WLW-D in Dayton, WLW-C in Columbus and later WLW-I in Indianapolis (after WLW-A was sold) when the program moved to television in the early 1950s. Then originating from WLW-TV, Midwestern Hayride was simulcast on WLW-AM until the early 1960s, then was revived in the mid-60s. At the show’s peak there was a one-year waiting list for tickets to be in the audience (100 people was the limit for each weekly show).

Hansen had much success in New Jersey, and got help from Smokey Warren.

In 1954 he cut his first two sides for RCA-Victor « X » sub-label (# 102). Neither « I Walked Away » (ballad) nor « The Mambo Queen » were spectacular songs, the only outstanding being the B side, Country mover, almost pop song.

The mambo queen download

Then we found him circa July 1956 (according to the Rite matrix system) with two songs on his own label, Rudy Hansen # 1226, cut or issued in Springfield, Oh. « Cry Baby Baby » is an average Country ballad, while « Saturday Jump » is THE side. Fast Rockabilly, urgent vocal, nice steel throughout, wild slapping bass, it’s got everything a ’50s lover could look for. I don’t know if the record itself is rare, although I always seen it labelled « advance copy », so Hansen seemingly sent it only to D.J.s. Note that the song was co-written with an interesting artist in his own right, Clay Eager, whom I will discuss one day upon.

In 1957, Hanson got a contract with Decca and recorded in Nashville 6 songs during 3 sessions, all pop : chorus (Anita Kerr), and I cannot really recommend any song, except « Puttin’ On The Style » or « Just As Long » from his last, early 1958, session.

After that Hansen disappeared. Maybe, like many others, he went disillusioned and hung up music.


SATURDAY JUMP

 

(C. Eager – R. Hansen)? RUDY HANSEN (Springfield Oh, 1956)

 

Boppin’ the blues and blue suede shoes?

 

Baby, lots of fun?

 

Down on the farm on Saturday night?

 

That’s were it all begun?

 

Everyone was waltzin’ in the ol’ red barn?

 

And they’re jumpin’ to the caller’s call?

 

When all of a sudden they got real wild?

 

This is what I saw?

 

Uncle Ben got his fiddle down off the wall?

 

Uncle Judy got his ol’ banjo?

 

And Sarah jumped up, kicked out her shoes?

 

Screamed out, Go Ben Go!?

 

Fiddler was a pickin’ like you never did hear?

 

You oughta hear the rooster crow?

 

That Saturday night down on the farm?

 

When uncle Ben started rock ‘n’ roll

 

The Ana/Olo labels: ’60s Nashville rockabilly!
jan 10th, 2013 by xavier

What do hardcore collectors expect from a GOOD Rockabilly or vintage Rock’n'Roll record ? Wild vocals ? A driving beat ? Numerous and extended guitar/piano breaks ? Yes, and the whole lot will be even closer to the mark ! However, one can also dig laid back vocals, a more relaxed beat, unobtrusive choruses and sax or steel guitar soli.

Now, in the two TOMMY PEDIGO singles, the main feature is the presence of THREE guitar breaks in three songs out of four (‘Memphis Town Blues‘ – alas, untraced, containing only two breaks). Thus, those highly distinctive latter-day Country Rockers find their place in any Rockabilly collection. They’re also definitely distinctive because of Tommy’s very nasal and laid back vocals (certainly Bob Dylan’s influence can be felt there) and thanks to the lead guitarist’s clear, treble and slightly echoey sound (I bet he used a Fender Telecaster). The songs, four Pedigo originals very similar in sound and structure, might have been cut at one same session but they were issued on two different labels, OLO and ANA (three letters each!), both based at the same address (Box 7831 – Nashville, Tennessee) and distributed by Sound Of Nashville. Olo 103 sees Tommy backed up by The Ridge Runners whereas Ana 106 credits The Barren River Boys as backing band ; they’re obviously the same outfit. Unless Tommy plays one of the instruments, the band is comprised of an electric lead guitar, an acoustic rhythm guitar, an electric bass and a snare drum (beaten with brushes).


Redheaded Woman‘ (Olo 103) is probably the pick of the bunch among Rockabilly lovers but the flip, ‘Memphis Town Blues‘, grows on you with each new spin. ‘Trouble‘ (Ana 106) is my own favorite (by a hair, really) ; the other side, ‘Whiskey, Women & Wild Living‘, is the most ‘Countryfied’ of the four. There’s a date written in the dead wax of Olo 103 : ’4/27/66′, proving to the most rabid collectors that the Sixties did not ring the knell of Rockabilly. Hear « Trouble », too : fine fast Rockabilly, nothing to do with Presley’s classic.

Tommy Pedigo had his own start in 1959 on wax : Atwell 100, a fine rural rockabilly, « She’s Gone », from Lafayette, TN. and under the name of the Pedigo Bros. They have another 45 on Atwell 101.

A survey of Ana/Olo label (taken from I forgot where)

OLO Records (Record No. 100) “ONLY IN MY DREAMS” and “LOVE IS BLIND” (Tommy W. Pedigo) REBECCA MAY & TOMMY with The Cumberland Coasters. The Cumberland Coasters were Rebecca & Tommy Pedigo playing guitars, Leonard Perry Whiteaker on bass fiddle, Melvin (Hezzie) McCormick on banjo and Rayburn Simmons, fiddle.

ANA Records (Record No. 101-a) “LOVE IS BLIND” (Tommy W. Pedigo) CHARLES REED and Rebecca Pedigo with The Cane River Boys. The band members were Delmus Neal on electric guitar/singer, Rayburn Simmons playing fiddle, and Mac Simmons on the bass fiddle. (Record No. 101-b) “GOODBYE OLD SAINT LOUIS” (Tommy W. Pedigo) CHARLES REED & DELMUS NEAL with The Cane River Boys.

ANA Records (Record No. 102-a) “I LOVE YOU” (Tommy W. Pedigo) Rebecca Pedigo & Delmus Neal with The Cane River Boys. (Record No. 102-b) “YOU HAVE WON MY LOVE” Rebecca Pedigo & Charles Reed with The Cane River Boys.

OLO Records (Record No. 103-a) “Red Headed Woman » and No. 103-b) “Memphis Town Blues” (Tommy W. Pedigo) Tommy Pedigo with The Ridge Runners. Band members were Delmus Neal on electric guitar, Robert Reed on bass and Billy Hillis on drums.

ANA Records (Record No. 104-a) “ONLY IN MY DREAMS” and (Record No. 104-b) “GREYHOUND BLUES” (Tommy W. Pedigo) REBECCA ROGERS with The Country Classics. The band members were Billy Yearwood on steel guitar, Johnny Sutton on electric guitar, Clint Walden on drums and Hank Rowland playing bass.

ANA Records (Record No. 105-A) “LITTLE BITTY DEVIL » and (Record No. 105-B) “SINGING THE BLUES AGAIN” (Tony Williams) TONY WILLIAMS with The Nashville Nighthawks.

ANA Records (Record No. 106-A) “WHISKEY WOMEN AND WILD LIVING” (Tommy W. Pedigo) and (Record No. 106-B) “TROUBLE” TOMMY PEDIGO with The Barren River Boys. Band members were Delmus Neal on electric guitar, Robert Reed on bass and Billy Hillis on drums.

ARTISTS REVUE Records (Record 1A) “MEMPHIS TOWN BLUES” (T. Pedigo) and (Record 1B) “SLAP HAPPY JAIL” (J. Austin) DEXTER, artist.

ANA Records (Record 108-A) “NASHVILLE BLUES” (Tommy W. Pedigo) COUNTRY CLASSIC ESQUIRE. Band members were William (BILL) Hardin singer and on sax, Rebecca Rogers on keyboard and backup singer, Mike Johnson on electric guitar, Jimmy Payne on bass and Jerry Cole on drums. (Record No. 108-B) “I LOVE YOU” (Tommy W. Pedigo) COUNTRY CLASSIC ESQUIRE. Band members were Rebecca Rogers on keyboard and singer, Mike Johnson on electric guitar and singer, William (BILL) Hardin on sax, Tommy Pedigo on bass and Jerry Drums on drums.

J&P CO. “SLAP HAPPY JAIL” and DON’T BOTHER ME, JIM” (J. Austin – P. Capshaw) Sung by Former Jailer DIAMOND JIM AUSTIN

ANA Records, “LITTLE BITTY DEVIL” (Tony Williams) JAMES & PATSY AUSTIN. Band members were Rebecca Rogers on keyboard, William (BILL) Hardin on sax, Mike Johnson on electric guitar, Tommy Pedigo on bass and Jerry Cole on drums. “START ALL OVER” (James Austin) JAMES AUSTIN, artist. Band members were Rebecca Rogers on keyboard, Mike Johnson on electric guitar, Tommy Pedigo on bass and Jerry Cole on drums.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reprint of Paul Vidal’s BigVJamboree site for most of the information. The idea of the article come from when I visited Paul during the ’80s, and he made me familiar with Tommy Pedigo.

Howie Stange, « Real Gone Daddy », vocal – Jim Flaherty’s Caravan
oct 9th, 2012 by xavier

 

 

A popular artist with country and western fans, Jim Flaherty performed often and helped organize and promote country music in New England with his concerts as well as through his position as manager of the successful Belmont Record Shop in Hartford. Jim recorded a country-ish cover of Elvis Presley’s hit « Are You Lonesome Tonight » (vocals by Howie Stange) / « My Foolish Heart » with vocals by Morey Dubois on Frankie Records FR-7. He cut more on Frankie, the forgettable double-sider « My Darling Rosie »/I’ll Never Be The Same » by Lou Dee. Jim also recorded two fine rockabilly/rockers tunes on a rare single on Jenn Records (J-101), « Real Gone Daddy« / »This Old Bomb of Mine » with vocals by Howie Stange. Finally Connecticut born Stange recorded on the New York Mell label (# 120) the fine double-sider ballad « Baby I’m Sorry/You Never Had It So Good« .
« Are you lonesome to-night » (Frankie)download (Thanks Mr. Steve Stange, son to Howie!)

 

 

 

frankie FR-7

courtesy Steve Stange

 

 

two more songs posted by Steve:

Howie Stange « What would you do if Jesus came to your house? » download

« Keep a light in your window tonight » download

 

 

 

 

mell 120 baby, I'm sorry

courtesy Steve Dickerman

 

 

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