Late June 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites (mid-50s to 1973..)

Howdy folks! Glad to meet you again. Just a note about the way I put in order those fortnight’s favorites selections. When a record out of my digital library appears to please me, be it Country boogie, Hillbilly hop or Rockabilly, I am hungry to find if the artist made another record in a similar style. Sometimes I am lucky, sometimes not: the disc was a one-off recording. Perhaps later, years later, I will put my hands on a second offering. At this stage the real research does begin: Internet is the main source for information on the record label, the artist, also books and magazines. Then I am doing the actual selection (7 to 10 records) and review every disc. This time you will be treated with 8 records.

Denny Turner

From Indiana between July and October 1955. Denny Turner cut “Deep Down In My Heart” on the Okie label (# 300). It’s a good uptempo bopper: steel solo, fiddle; an assured vocal. The reverse side of this record has a sacred vocal.

Tommy Nelson

From Shawnee, OK, in 1961 came Tommy Nelson on the Dixie label (main serie). “Dangling On A String” (# 919) is not his best record: it’s a slow rocker with rinky dink piano, and an uninventive guitar. His best sides can be found on Dixie 814: “Hobo Bop” and its flipside “Honey Moon Blues”are superior Rockabillies, valued at $ 800-1000, if you can afford a copy. “Dangling On A String” is even sold for $ 125-150.

Jimmy Wert & The Four Squirts

“Please Believe Me” was issued on the Chambersburg, PA. Skyline label # 752 in 1959. Possibly another Starday custom. It’s slow bopper crossing Rockabilly. A bluesy fine guitar is embroidering the vocal. The flipped “Bingo Blues” was reviewed in late December 2017 fortnight’s favorites.

Margaret (Maggie) Owens

“No Hard Times”, issued in 1973.

A great rendition of the old Jimmie Rodgers classic. Very nice guitar, an energetic vocal performance – even some yodels. And this one was released as late as 1973 in Cincinnati on the Rams label # 305129.

Billy Free

“I’ll Tear Your Playhouse Down” is a classic Hillbilly bopper (with a touch of Country rock: it dates from…1968!) by Billy Free on the Dianne label (# 407) out of Birmingham, AL. Great vocal, nice lead guitar (alas, a too short solo). This record is still affordable at $ 60-75.

Leon Stafford & his State Drifters

The recording location in not known for this record, neither the date of release; however aural evidence does place “Eight Ball” in the mid-’50s. A good ‘little’ bopper with nasal voice, a risky-dink piano, and a fiddle solo.

Harold Smith with Slim Glisson & the Trail Riders & Danny Clark

A call-and-response format for this uptempo “Listen To Me Baby” to be found on the Rondo label, out of Savannah, Ga., a predictable Starday custom). It was issued in 1956 and does feature a romping piano (nice solo), plus fiddle and a good steel solo.

Lindburg Deavers

The last disc of this selection do come from Mobile, Al. on the Shane label (# 11050), a subsidiary to Sandy Records. It’s hard to date such a record, I’d say late ’50s. Lindburg Deavers releases a fine Rockabilly, “Miss Me Now”: a very nice piano and guitar. No one could give a price yet, that’s how this record is so rare.

Sources: my own digital archives; Allan Turner for Dianne and Rondo records; YouTube for Lindburg Deavers per example.

Late May 2019 bopping fortnight favorites

Howdy folks! Here we go again for a new selection (rather a short ne) of bopping favorites. They range from late ’40s (Cousin Deems Sanders) to late ’50s (Ray Stone). With the odd issue from Detroit (Peter De Bree) or California (Gene Crabb), they are all Texas records.

Cousin Deems Sanders and his Goat Herders with Walt McCoy

On the then big concern Crystal (# 246), let’s enjoy to the first selection’s choice, “Goatburger Boogie”: a bouncing instrumental. A boogie pattern guitar, a swooping piano and a demented fiddle. McCoy also released “Cowboy Boogie” and “I’m Gonna Get A Honky Tonk Angel”, reviewed in March 2019’s fortnight.

Jill Turner acc. by Art West & his Sunset Riders

From February 1946, on the Urban label (# 111), Jill Turner offer a fast (bit on the novelty side) “I’m Going Down To The Mountain”. A good fiddle, and a fine interplay between accordion and steel. She also had “Yodeling Cow Girl” on Urban 117.

Tony Farr

This artist, billed “And His Swinging Guitar”, comes next with two records on the Enterprise label based in Beaumont, Texas. “What’s The Use” has a nice guitar, but the fiddle is prominent (# 1208) on this 1958 issue, while “There’s No else In Marrying Me” (# 1211) is a jumping tune with a similar instrumentation.

Peter De Bree

In 1957 and Detroit, MI. Peter De Bree cut for Fortune Record (# 193) a rocked up version of the Hank Williams’ classic, “My Bucket’s Got A Hole In It”. A solid piano takes the lead all through, while the guitar is largely overshadowed. Vocal of Bernie Sanders is OK. Nevertheless a good rocker.

Leonard Clark & the Land of Sky Boys

On the small label of Klub # 3108, located in South Carolina, here’s Leonard Clark for the Rockabilly “Come To Your Tommy Now”; assured vocal, good guitar and piano for a 1962 record.

Gene Crabb & his Round Up Rhythm Boys

Rural Rhythm in California was owned by the songwriter Johnny O’Neal, and issued important records by Johnny Tyler, Kenny Smith or Johnny Skiles between 1955 and 1960. Here is Gene Crabb (actually a drummer) and his “Blues Won’t Bother Me” (# 506): bass chords guitar, very effective steel and the good vocal of one Eddie Willis. Crabb had done in ’53 on the Richtone label (# 353, location: Dallas) the very nice “Truck Stop Lucy”, and co-worked with Eddie Miller on 4 *. He released also “Gotta Have A Woman/I’ve tried” on Rural Rhythm 529.

Ray Stone

On T.N.T. 169 (1959) we finally found Ray Stone and “China Doll”, a fine rocker – a clicking guitar. The whole is a complete change with the previous records. He also sang fronting Jerry Dove’s band on # 173 (“Why Don’t You Love Me”).
Sources : my own archives ; HBR for Rural Rhythm; Ultra Rare Rockabilly’s for Leonard Clark; YouTube (Tony Farr, Peter De Bree). Jill Turner picture from “Hop Bop’n’Hop” As you without doubt noticed, I was writing this feature with a lack of inspiration. Be sure however the music comes first. Thanks for forthcoming comments.

Early May 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks! This is the early May 2019 fortnight’s favorites selection: 6 artists, most of them having their records issued between the late ’40s and the mid-50s, with a brief entry into the late ’50s.

First song, “Too Young To Get Married”, is a fast item – rural hick vocal, fiddle solo and steel. A gas! Released on Birmingham, AL. GG # 516 label.

The second Bill Lancaster selection, “It’s Saturday Night (And I’m Going To Town)” has a rinky dink piano. A pure heaven Hillbilly bopper from 1955, also on GG label # 519.

Bill Lancaster’s Roving Gamblers

“Past Love” by Bill Lancaster (R.S. of # 519) is medium honky tonk – sincere vocal with steel. Lancaster had another record on his apparently own label, Bills-45 (untraced)

Fiddlin’ Willie & the Ozark Pals

Accordion was a very popular instrument in the late ’40s Country. It’s the main one in Fiddlin’ Willie’s “Knocking at Your Door” recorded on Saint Louis, MO Disco label # 1500. A fast number with of course a nice fiddle solo. Vocal is by Leon Key, one of the brothers Robert, Richard and Willie Key, respectively mandolin and/or guitar, and fiddle.

Fiddlin’ Willie & the Ozark Pals on Sarg

Gone was the accordion for this August 1956 item, “Our Secret Rendezvous”, a medium paced number with of course a nice fiddle solo. Accordion is replaced by a steel. Vocal is by Leon Key, one of the brothers Robert, Richard and Willie Key, respectively mandolin and/or guitar, and fiddle.A strong Louvin Brothers influence in the vocals. This record was cut in Saint Louis and offered by the Key Brothers’ manager to Charles Fitch (it’s the only non-Texas Sarg recording) who agreed to issue it.

Leroy Dobson

From the West Coast on the Ludwig label (1958), owned by Rodney Morris (it has been reported that the label was named after his son’s name), one Leroy Dobson for “I Wanta Make Love” (# 1005). A fast and uptempo number, a lot of steel = almost Rockabilly. Last time it was sold, $ 314!

Roy Harris & his Happy Hillbillies

Roy Harris was touring in Mississippi. He was signed by Lilian McMurry on her Trumpet label in Jackson and released “No One Else” (# 134) accompanied by the Buzz Busby Orchestra [for a future fortnight). Here we find him in 1954 on the Johnny Vincent’s Champion label, which was eventually forerunner to Ace.”Too Much” (# 105) is a medium paced ditty, with piano and fiddle to the fore. Harris also released records on Flair and Modern.

Walter (Tex) Dixson & his Radio Ramblers

Tex (or Walter, or even Mason) Dixon hailed from Birmingham, AL. and released many records all along the ’50s. We at bopping are now trying to set up his entire story to be published in a near future. Here it’s his first one, backed by the same band as on “Birmingham Bounce” by Hardrock Gunter and on the same label (Bama 2200). “Honky Tonk Swing” is an energetic performance, with a romping piano. Guitar and steel are great. A very rare record.

Gene Wyatt

Once more a West coast record. Ebb was owned by Art Rupe and was an outlet for Southern artists. I release here Gene Wyatt and “Lover Boy” (# 123, from 1957). Fine rinky dink piano, two great guitar solos and heavy drums. “Lover Boy” is a nice Rockabilly rocker.

Sources : my own archives ; 45cat (Bill Lancaster; Mellow’s Log Cabin (Walter Dixson); YouTube for Fiddling’ Willie, Gene Wyatt and Roy Harris.”The Sarg Records Anthology,1954-1964″ (BF)

Late April 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello, folks ! Hello to past visitors ; hi ! to new ones. This is the late April 2019 fortnight’s selection.

Henry McPeak

Let’s begin with a Starday custom record issued mid-1959 by HENRY McPEAK on the HG label (# 771). McPeak was born 1929 in Snowville, Va. « I Feel Like Yelling » is a fast bopper : lots of guitar ( a great solo picking), an assured vocal (which reminds me of The Lonesome Drifter, alias Tommy Johnson). McPeak had another disc the next year on HG # 851 with « When You Kissed Me »: very different, more melodic. Again that good guitar, even a Rockabilly solo. The record goes on sale from $ 280 to 380.

Bob Burton

BOB BURTON next (aided by Rex Jennings and Shorty Ashford) delivers on Harry Glenn’s owned Mar-Vel 952 (issued 1954 in Hammond, IN) the good « Forty Acres Of My Heart » : a fast fiddle solo and a short steel solo. The three musicians join unison in the chorus. Of course, Burton had other good records on Mar-Vel as « Boogie Woogie Baby Of Mine » (Mar-Vel 951) or « Tired Of Rockin’ » (Mar-Vel 953, 1956).

Johnny Dollar

Next was issued in 1961 on the D label # 1185. Good bopper is « Crawling Back To You » by JOHNNY DOLLAR, great steel led on a fast number. Dollar (his real name), despite many a good record, never got it big, and remained a minor artist. He had several occupations : truck driver, life insurance salesman, lumber yard man among others when he could. He was also dee-jaying (thanks Merle Kilgore) on Shreveport’s KZAE, and finally cut for D, aided by Shelby Singleton.

Johnny Bond

An oldie (1950) on Columbia 20704 now : JOHNNY BOND was a constant Bopper in the early ’50s with things like this « Mean Mama Boogie », cut on the West coast. Great harmonica by Jerry Adler, a little guitar by Jerry Scoggins ; Bond is in particularly good voice.

Jim Oertling

On the Hammond label and as late as 1965, here’s JIM OERTLING & the Bayou Boys for two selections. « Old Moss Back » (# 267) has a terrific guitar intro, an urgent vocal and a fine guitar solo. « Back Forty » (# 268) is a mid-tempo with nice vocal and a Rockabilly guitar solo.

Tommy Elliott

Finally back in the early 50s with TOMMY ELLIOTT and the Line Riders. « Same Dog Bit Me » was released on Texas Time label (# 130) and is a hillbilly bopper, fast fiddle-led with a nice upright bass.

Sources : YouTube ; Notes to D Singles vol. 1 (BF) ; the autobiography of Johnny Bond (a JEMF book) ; «Ohio river » for Bob Burton details ; 78-worlds for Tommy Elliott.

Early April 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! This is early April 2019 fortnight’s favorites’ selection.

Lefty Nicks

We begin with a rarity, aimed at Rockabilly circles, and sold between $ 800 and 1000. On the Nicktone label (# 6020) LEFTY NICKS delivers a great « Model A Ford Blues ». An utempo half-sung vocal over great guitars and steel throughout tune.

John Talley

Then a well-known figure, this of JOHN TALLEY with two different styles. First an uptempo straight Nashville style – steel and fiddle solos, guitar to the fore – for « Hillbilly Sweetheart » on Jamboree 509 from 1954. Then a « perfect » song on Mercury 70902 : « (I’ve Changed My) Wild Mind » is a classic Rockabilly, with great guitar and a lot of echo, from mid-1956. Talley had another good tune, « « Shine, Shave And Shower (It’s Saturday Night) » on Tennessee 752 from 1954.

Eddie Bond & the Stompers

On Mercury too, EDDIE BOND & his Stompers and two classic sides, « Boppin’ Bonnie » and « Baby, Baby, Baby » (Mercury 70941, issued August 1956). Bond was from Memphis, TN, and delivers great tunes on a par with what Sun was doing at the time. Lot of echo, uptempo song with drums.”Bopping’ Bonnie” was written by Jerry Huffman and Jody Chastain, the two sidemen of Charlie Feathers. The B-side is a bit slowier with a touch of blues.

James Wilson

From Shreveport, La., the 17-years old JAMES WILSON offer in 1957 on Ram Records (unknown #) the great « Wilson Blues N° 1 ». Of course a bluesy uptempo, a good atmospheric tune with drums. The record when located change hands for $ 600-700.

Luke Gordon

Two sides now by LUKE GORDON. Originating from Kentucky, he’d cut in 1958 (May, or November) on Vienna, Va. Blue Ridge label (# 502). « Dark Hollow » is the old Bill Browning song, done here with dobro and fiddle. Gordon’s voice is well fitted to this type of material.. The flipside « You May Be Someone (Where You Come From) » is in the same style : fiddle and dobro solos.

Sonny Burns

Finally SONNY BURNS, a largely underrated Starday artist. Here he is with a July (?) 1956 Eddie Noack tune, « If You See My Baby » : it’s an uptempo with fiddle (Ernie Hunter) and steel (Herbie Remington) solos. Classic Starday backing : tinkling piano of Doc Lewis, and Hal Harris on lead guitar.

Sources: my own archives; 45-cat; RCS; YouTube

Late March 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Late March 2019 fortnight’s favorites : the 6th of this year, and once more 9 goodies in Hillbilly bop style, from 1952 to 1965.

Wade Ray

He was a fiddler (1913-1998) and leader of a Western swing orchestra during the early ’50s, between Indiana and Illinois. Here a delivers an energetic (no fiddle, but drums) trucker song, « Idaho Red » from early 1954, on the RCA-Victor label (# 20-5624).

Burrie Manso & the Bonnivilles

On the Town-Crier label (# 200) from an unknown location (no clue from the record label), BURRIE MANSO and the Bonnivilles delivers a Rockabilly rocker with the $ 600-700 tag, « My Woman ». Very fine guitar, reminiscent of Scotty Moore, on this disc from 1960.

Bill Hicks & the Southerneers

From Detroit, although backed by the Southerneers (no doubt in order to attract real South expatriates in Michigan), BILL HICKS did cut in 1957 two fine songs for Fortune records # 188 : first a slow one, « She’s Done Gone », with a good guitar throughout ; second an uptempo and over a boogie guitar, with an almost surreal sound to them. Hicks had also records on Hi-Q and Happy Hearts.

Honey & Sonny (he Davis Twins)

In 1963, and in Charleston, W. Va. was published the great rural sounding duet (male/female) of « I’m Rough Stuff » (a Bill Carlisle song) by the Davis Twins – as they were called – also named HONEY & SONNY on their own H&S label (# 7069). Great lead guitar and infectious bass rhythm.

Charlie Huff (& Bobby Kent)

In Oklahoma City CHARLIE HUFF (and Bobby Kent) did cut in 1959 or early ’60s an uptempo, mid-paced « Can’t Tame Wild Women » : a joyful song over good guitar and electric bass (# 726). Huff had a long string of releases, from 1957 , on his own Huff label.

In Oklahoma City CHARLIE HUFF (and Bobby Kent) did cut in 1959 or early ’60s an uptempo, mid-paced « Can’t Tame Wild Women » : a joyful song over good guitar and electric bass (# 726). Huff had a long string of releases, from 1957 , on his own Huff label.

Bennie Hess

Even more prolific than Huff was Texan BENNIE HESS. Was chosen from his abundant production a 1965 record, « Trucker’s Blues » : fine backing (guitar and steel) and infectious rhythm issued on Musicode 5691. Other Hess labels which he issued on were Opera, Jet, Space/Spade, Popularity, Showland among others, that is without mentioning aliases and pseudonyms. Maybe Hess will have his story on in boppin.org someday.

Frank Hunter & the Black Mountain Boys

Finally in Tennessee by the Sarasota, Fl. originating FRANK HUNTER & His Back Mountain Boys, both sides (# 1049) of a Rich-R’-Tone label do « Tennessee Boy », a really fine and fast Bluegrass bopper (banjo and fiddle led), and « Little Boy Blue », a mid-paced bopper.

Sources : 78worlds (45-cat) for many a scan, YouTube (Honey & Sonny)(Bill Hicks)(Wade Ray), HBR-28 for Frank Hunter.