Late October 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello, this is the late October 2019 favorites’ selection, and very different things this time.

These are two tracks of the nearest JIMMY MURPHY ever bordered to Rockabilly. A veteran (his 1951 sides on RCA-Victor) of Country bluesy sides, with an appeal to religious ones, like « Electricity ».(RCA 21-0447), and his two-sided November 1955 « Here Kitty Kitty »/ »I’m Looking For A Mustard Patch » (Columbia 21486) sounded (with Onie Wheeler on harmonica) as if they had been recorded in..1945. That was the main problem for Jimmy Murphy, always behind the times. Nevertheless great acoustic guitar and assured,vocal. A must for Rockabilly fans.

Next HANK CADWELL and the Saddle Kings on the West coast D’Oro label (# 103) do come with a Western swing tinged opus, « Alibi » from late ’40s : accordion solo, fiddle solo, lovely assured vocal and chorus.

Then ABE LINK, or A. BLINK (he went under both names) on the Ohio Canton label. « Skeleton Bookie », « and the Western Spotlighters » (S.T.R.C Canton 106) has beautiful steel effects for a Halloween (?) disc, while « Yodelin’ Blues » (Canton 107) is very different. A classic shuffling bopper from 1955. Lot of yodel of course, and a lot less steel.

We jump to 1961 for a male duet. A nice country-rocker by PHIL BEASLEY and CHARLEY BROWN on the Briar (# 111) label, from unknown location. « Good Gosh Gal » has loud drums, and a nice guitar throughout (a fine solo).

On the B.W. label (location unknown), here’s KENNY BIGGS (B.W. 615) for a nice Country-rocker « There’s No Excuse » (early ’60s). One expects in this very melodic tune some chorus (very unobstrusive if ever present).

Col. Tom Parker paid the Norfolk, Va. and Jacksonville, Fl. radio stations not to play PHIL GRAY’s disc on Rhythm 101, and even gathered the copies to destroy from a too Elvisy (Sun style) Rockabilly. He even had done to prevent Gene Vincent to be unplayed in vain. Gray was 15 years old when he cut « Pepper Hot Baby » and « Bluest Boy In Town ». Great guitar, Elvis-style hiccups (the song is like « Baby Let’s Play House »), a real success. This disc is so rare that a copy, when it comes on auction, may get as high as $ 3000 !

Finally a romper with AMOS MILBURN and his great rendition of the Don Raye’s classic, « Down The Road Apiece » (Aladdin 161, 1946-47). Great vocal, fabulous boogie piano.

Sources : YouTube ; 45cat, 78worlds, various compilations, W. Agenant « Columbia 20000 » serie, Gripsweat (A. Blink)

Early October 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks. Here is the early October 2019 fortnight’s favorites selection. There will be a unusual amount of records on major labels, all cut between 1955 and 57.

He had first appeared in the late August 2016 fortnight’s selection for « Big Money » (1956) and the original of « Six Days On The Road » (1961). Here is the return of PAUL DAVIS for his second release on M-G-M (# 12209). « I’m On The Loose » is also a solid bopper, cut in July 1955.

A nice combination of bass, mandolin (probably) and fiddle is backing « I’ll Be Broken Hearted » by HYLO BROWN on Capitol 3448 – a medium uptempo weeper from June 1956.

Cash Box sept. 9, 1956

Buddy Shaw

Now on a Starday Custom (# 643, from June 1957) by BUDDY SHAW and the minor classic « Don’t Sweep That Dirt On Me ». A fast rockabilly, typical in Starday sound (guitar and piano are battling). Shaw had aslo Starday 609 (« No More ») and 618, similar style.

Bill Dudley

An intimate vocal on an uptempo rhythm, with prominent fiddle and an insistant rhythm guitar for BILL DUDLEY and « Wailing Wall » released on Capitol 2531.

On RCA-Victor 47-6147 now, BUDDY THOMPSON does offer « Don’t Kindle Up The Flame » : a mad fiddle (solo), a good steel solo, a fast bopping piano – a nice tune (June 1955). Thompson went later on Atco for Rock’n’Roll sides.

Cash Box 18 June, 1955

Stan Hardin

Two sides by STAN HARDIN from June 1957, and the surprisingly Hank Williams styled « Hungry Heart » : an uptempo shuffler with fiddle and steel. « Give Me All Your Lovin’, Baby », the flpside, is a fast bopper with energetic vocal. Decca 30302, obviousy backed by the Nashville cream of musicians.

Alvadean Coker

Finally a female bopper, ALVADEAN COKER and her « We’re Gonna Bop » (1955). A call-and-response format for a jumping bopper. A nice one. To be found on Abbott 173.

Sources: mainly Internet.

Late September 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks ! This is the late September 2019 bopping fortnight’s selection (9
records).

First we have TROY JORDAN & his Cross-B-Boys from Midland, Tx. There’s a joyful uptempo with piano – steel barely audible, plus a fiddle solo : « Who Flung That Mater » on Tred-Way 100.

Now here’s JIM HAND with the Mountain Ramblers – although the disc comes from NYC. A bit crooning 1947 goodie ; discreet steel and an accordion solo for « There’s No One Home » on Crown 156. Jordan had also «  Columbus Stockade Blues »  on the flipside (untraced).

ARCHIE JEFFERIES and the Blue Flame Boys, probably from the West coast, are doing on a 4* Custom Blue Flame (OP-107) label, « G. I. Talking Blues », a decent bopper from 1950 with rinky-dink piano and steel. Flipside « One For The Money, Two For The Show » is a good mellow bopper.

From Detroit, MI comes CAL DAVIS. He sings a bluesy, well sung, convincing « Loving Lifetime » on the Mack # 25 label. Good fiddle.

TOMMY KIZZIAH & the West Coast Ramblers give us « Two Timing Kind », an uptempo bopper, a good guitar throughout and a lot of fiddle on another 4* custom, Pearl label (# 203).

« Red’s boogie » is done by OZARK RED (rn. Red Murrell) and his Ozark Mountain Boys : a very good instrumental, a bit Western in style – agile guitar and good piano backing. It’s to be found on Cavalier 811.

Finally SMOKEY WARD and « Dog Bite Yo’ Hide » : prominent fiddle and forceful Bluegrass vocal (chorus), a nice and fast mandolin solo, on Barrel Head Gang 1001 released June 1951.

Sources : YouTube mainly ; also photograph of Tommy Kizziah from the book « A star that winkled but never got to shine » (Sharon Kizziah-Holmes)

Early September 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

I don’t know where DON WINTERS hailed from, probably Nashville. He has during the mid-’50s several good discs.

On RCA-Victor 47-6154 first he asked his Lady « Forgive My Mistakes » : a nice shuffler – piano, steel solo and an extrovert, really sincere vocal.
A later side (RCA 6348) « One Way Is Bound To Be Right » finds him, in a faster rhythm. A pleasant side.

Finally he embarked Rockabilly bandwagon with a release on Coin # 102 : « Be My Baby, Baby » is still Hillbilly Bop, but almost Rockabilly. The collectors couldn’t be mistaken. The Coin issue is valued at $ 150-200. Flipside « Pretty Moon » is pure heaven Rockabilly with its urgent vocal.

A typical Honky tonker from 1956 comes next with BILL WIMBERLY and his Country Rhythm Boys : « You Can’t Lean On Me » has a good steel (solo) and fiddle. A pretty nice record for the era. Mercury 70900. Just a few months earlier (February) Wimbery had released (Mercury 70815) « Ole Mister Cottontail » and on the flipside a lively instrumental « Country Rhythm ». Later on he was on Starday (« Back Street »).

Is it useful to develop on AL TERRY ? He’s already known since 1953 for his first sides on Feature and Champion. Here he is in July 1956 on the Hickory (# 1056) label out of Nashville for a typical mid-tempo Honky tonk bordering Rockabilly, « Roughneck Blues ». A lazy vocal and the lead guitar played by none other than Grady Martin.

Casho Box, Nov. 10, 1956

We jump back in May 1954 for a real ‘tour-de-force’ by the Father of Bluegrass, BILL MONROE : here it’s his « Whitehouse Blues » (Decca 29141). It’s the FASTEST Bluegrass tune ever.

Finally from Texas in 1956 a jumping little Rockabilly bopper with “Dig Them Squeaky Shoes » by FRANK STARR on the Lin label # 1009.

Sources : my own archives ; YouTube ; various compilations.

Early August 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello folks! It’s plain Summer, so if you intend to spare some time with me, here is the early August 2019 selection (10 tracks), mostly from the mid-50s.When you hear them, please get me a comment, or even: ask for more! Here we go.

With such a name, and with regards to the rest of his career, Jay Chevalier sounds a Louisiana artist. However, this is his very first record cut for Cajun, a label out of Virginia. “Rockin’ Roll Angel” (Cajun 101B) is a furious Rockabilly from 1957 – lot of echo on the vocal, a wild steel, a bizarre percussion (is this the bass playing?) and a guitar “a la Travis”. Chevaler went later on Pel (“Bill Cannon”) and Goldband 1105 in 1960 (“Castro Rock”, with political overtones for the Cuba crisis). This record changes hands for $ 300-350.

Al Ferrier and the Bopping’ Billies, the next artist, is also a Louisiana one. Let’s hear him in his first (both sides) issue on Lake Charles’ Goldband 1031. “No No Baby” (legal reissue here, that’s how rare is the original) is a proud Rockabilly bop: fiddle solo, and driving guitar/bass from Spring 1956. The flip side, “I’ll Never Do Any Wrong” is only slowier: a bluesy screaming weeper with 2 fiddle solos ad a guitar more to the fore. The original is sold for $ 100-150.

Cash Box, April 14, 1956

Jack Turner has already a minor Hillbilly bop/Rockablly classic with “Everybody’s Rockin’ (But Me)” ; the flip side is more Hillbilly bop: an uptempo with fiddle and steel. Valued at $ 50-60.

Cash Box April 19, 1956

Buddy Hawk was a Wheeling, W.Va. artist, although the Sheraton label was out of Boston, Ma. He released in late 1954 the surprisingly good (valued only at $ 25-30) double-sider “Honey Baby”/”My Heart’s A-Beatin'” (Sheraton 1003). He was part of the W.C.O.P. Hayloft Jamboree and the record is pure Hillbilly bop.

Cash Box, December 25, 1954

Wayland Seals & The Oil Patch Boys (!) do deliver in 1957 on the Slim Willet owned Winston label (# 1016) a fast Rockabilly. Strong vocal, a lovely guitar and a 6 (or 12?) strings-guitar throughout.”When I’m Gone” is sold for $ 150-200 bucks.

Cash Box August 17, 1957

Th Whitey Knight Orchestra offer on the Wesy coast “Another, Brew, Bartender” on Sage 205 from 1955. A weird, demented fiddle over a nice vocal plus a steel solo. This is a great record, although only valued at $ 15-20.

On the New Mexico Jewel label (# 108), we finish with Wade Jackson (backed on chorus by Weldon & Wanda Rogers) and “Seven Kinds Of Love”. 1960. A ballad, with a very nice ‘modern’ steel; the fiddle is buzzing (played ‘pizzicato’: stupendous – hear it!). Jackson was also on Gallatin’ Tennessee label (“Father Time And Mother Nature”).

Sources: mainly Internet, 45cat and my own archives.

Late July 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Jimmy Key & his Timber Trail Riders

Originating from Cullman, Tx, in 1927, he worked his way through Florida, Mississipi, Tennessee before relocating himself in Fort Worth, Tx. It is then surprising that his record label, HiLite was one out of Barre, Vermont. His “Super Market Day” (# 102) is cheerful: a muted trumpet, a fine walking bass and a fiddle solo; a cross between cityzed Hillbilly bop and Western swing. Key had another disc on Bayou.

Key had two other records. One from 1958 on the Tennessee Logan label (unheard), and another from 1954 on the Bayou label, in the “Country serie”; “I’ll Never Get Out Of Your Way” (# 3002, well worth the seek for) is a good bopper to be found on “High On The Hog”, vol. 2, Cactus bootleg label.

Cliff Waldon & the Westernaires

A steel, a fiddle, a string bass with solo, over a sympathetic vocal do combine for the fine bopper “My Baby Doll” on the small Mark label (# 107) located in Utica, NY. Waldon had another one, “Indian Woman/Get Off The Stool”.

Cash Nox, August 30, 1957

Jesse Rogers & his 49ers

He had a long and rich story during the ’30s and until the late ’50s. As a cousin of the late Jimmie Rodgers, he easily did yodel and sang those great ballads about West and trains. A first track from his ‘golden age’ is “Howlin’ And Prowlin'”, a medium-paced bopper from 1953 (M-G-M 11422). It’s a shuffler with piano, steel and a bluesy guitar solo over an ‘answer response’ by the band

Four years later, Rockabilly had passed its way through, and Rogers must adapt his style to new trends, hence “You Can’t Hang That Monkey On My Back”, half amusing, half threatening fast hillbilly rocker on the Arcade label (# 143) out of Philly, PA: steel (solo), accordion (solo), the now famous pattern of ‘answer/response’ by the band. Here it’s a perfect example of a Country & Western band trying to catch the public’s tastes.

Weldon Rogers

Rogers (apparently no relation Jesse above) released in July 1957 his version of Elvis’ Sun recording of “Trying To Get To You” on Imperial 5451, a nice ballad, lot of echo on guitar and sincere vocal. But it was actually Roy Orbison and his full band doing the tune, already cut for Je-Well (# 101) issued the year before.
Weldon Rogers had also interesting sides on Jewel (“Women Drivers”), Queen (Texas label) and Peach (early ’60s). The Imperial one was the B-side to a Rockabilly classic, “So long, Good Luck And Goodbye”.

Bill Guyton Tennessee Playboys

Bill Guyton was another ‘unknown’ artist who, despite a recording (although on a small label) never made it. He even never made a second record. “I’ve Got A Little Time For Loving” (Pride 3000) cut in Nashville during the mid-to-late Fifties is a shuffling Hillbilly bop: assured vocal, fiddle, steel and pinky-dink piano. Nothing spectacular or unique, a pleasant side to listen to.

Cash Box, October 22, 1956

Here’s a shuffler (once more; after all it’s the easier way to dancers) by a prolific artist. He doesn’t sound country pop yet. A fine example of his early offerings, with a blues touch. A very strong voice (some yodel and hiccups), backed by fiddle, bass and a guitar particularly uninventive

Jimmie Skinner

Here Jimmy Skinner does offer his usual style: electric mandolin (solo) and a bluesy tune. This “Muddy Water Blues” dates from June 1956.

Sources : my own archives; YouTube (Cliff Waldon),45cat/78worlds in some cases; pictures on Google; Ultra rare Hillbilly boogie serie.