Early August 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Early August 2020 bopping fortnight’s favories, mainly from 1954 to 1958, with a short array in 1953.

Bill “Zekie” Browning

Zekie Browing (seated left)

BILL ‘ZEKIE’ BROWING (not to be confused with Bill Browning, who had great records on Cincinnati’s Island and Starday labels), cut early in 1958 the proud Country-Rocker (because of the drums) « Bad Case Of The Blues » on Lucky 0005. Great steel and fiddle solos, also good piano. (with a $ 200-250 tag). On Lucky 0001 ha also had issued « I’ll Pay You Back ».

Taylor Porter

TAYLOR PORTER next – first on Starday Custom 694. The artist was out of Kentucky. « It’s Over Now » has an heavy bass for an uptempo and a lot of echo on the vocal. A battling between fiddle and guitar. A very effective side. The B-side « No More Loving You » has the same characteristics, very melodic.

We found the same Porter on 1960 Janet 26-60 and « Way Out There » : a Rockabilly guitar, a fiddle, even a bit of yodeling. The B-side remains untraced (« I Can See It In Your Eyes »).

Another artist from Kentucky, RONNIE BURTON has, on the Tam label # 101 a nice slowie, « Keeper Of My Heart », then the very fast, rollicking « Somebody’s Been Babyen My Baby » (Tam 102), with a steel solo.

Doye O’Dell

On the West coast now with DOYE O’DELL who cut on Intro many a fine sides (i.e. « Diesel Smoke »). Here on the Radio label (# 115, from 1958) he delivers « Bring A Hammer And A Needle », a good Folk influenced bopper (12s strings guitar solo)

Eddie Hazelwood>

Another Intro label artist : EDDIE HAZLEWOOD, who had a long array of boppers. I chose his personal hillbilly version of « Hound Dog » (issued March 1953, shortly after the Big Mama one, but a large 3 years before Elvis). A lovely shuffler with steel and good spirited vocal.. Hazelwood was killed, along with Jimmie Widener, by an armed robberer in Nashville (1973).

From Houston the very unknown RED MANSEL who offers a moderate-paced « Changing Heart », a very nice vocal (1958).(All Star 7165)

Buck Griffin

The final track is a bopping rocker from 1956. BUCK GRIFFIN released on Lin 1015 the rocker « Ballin’ And Squallin’ ». The guitar is ‘chanting’, we have a steel and a piano solo over a strong rhythm. Griffin made a lot of this material and deserves a complete feature in bopping.org.

Sources : YouTube (Porter Taylor on Janet), Internet for Ronnie Burton. My own archives for the rest.

Late July 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

howdy, folks. This is the plain summer 2020 fortnight’s favorites selection. 9 tunes cut between 1949 and 1961.

As the title implies, « Guitar Shuffle » by the guitarist HANK GARLAND i(1930-2004) is a fine bopper. The rhythm is given by Garland, who does also a good solo on Decca 46250. Recorded July 4, 1950.

Merle Matts II

On the NJ label Cool (# 111, released 1958), now the fast « Tennessee Baby » by MERLE MATTS II. Rhythm given by a banjo. An urgent vocal, good steel (played like a bottleneck).

« I’m Sorry Now » by BUD DECKLEMAN is the lastest tune this time (1961). He’d cut his most known « Daydreamin’ » on Meteor in 1954 – a fair sized hit ; then a string of hillbilly releases on M-G-M (1955-56), before dropping into semi-obscurity (according to a sideman, he wasn’t reliable). He reappears for a swansong : medium paced, good steel. A typical early 60s Country.(Stomper Time M80w-3355).

Sam Nichols

Back to 1949 on M-G-M 10440, « Keep Your Motor Hot », indeed a truck song, by SAM NICHOLS. Fast bopper, Western tinged.

On the Circle Dot label (# 1006), out of Minneapolis, DAVE DUDLEY released the fine uptempo ballad (aggressive steel) « Picture Of My Heart »(early 60s).

Dave Dudley

Out of Nashille on the very small Jamboree label (501), DICK STRATTON offers « Fat Gal Boogie »in 1950-51. A guitar boogie rocker. Steel and string bass solos. Stratton was also on Tennessee 795 for « Pistol Boogie ».

Dick Stratton

Ralph Collier

A medium shuffler now : « You’ll Come Runnin’ Home To Me » by RALPH COLLIER on the Blazon label # 105 out of Nashville.

Lee ‘Red’ Melson

Lee ‘RED’ Melson did « Boss Man Blues » on the Grand Prairie label # 501 : a very expressive vocal for a medium uptempo with solid fiddle but uninventive guitar. Melson was also on the Georgia Ridgecresst label.

Jimmy Boyd

JIMMY BOYD, singer/actor, releases « Rockin ‘ Dow The Mississip », a Country rocker from June 1956 (Columbia 21471).i

Sources : my own archives. « Rockailly Hoodlums, vol. 2 (Collector); Bert Martin’s old tapes (Hank Garland, Dick Stratton, Sam Nichols, Bud Deckleman); Tom Sims’ cassette (Dave Dudley); eBay 45s (Lee ‘Red’Melson, Merle Matts II).

Early July 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello, folks. Return over here of Summer’s heat. I suppose it’s the same for you. Here’s a bundle of Hillbilly boppers you can wander to even download ; indeed I am releasing not common tunes.

Abe Heape

First cut for the Stillwater, Oklahome label Rose in 1958, an Hillbilly rocker by ABE HEAPE (female), « Short Fellow Blues ».(# 116). This Rose label is no to be confused with the Cisco, Texas Rose label owned by Charlie Brown (4 superior sides) , from 1955 ; maybe for another forttnght’s selection.

Hank Locklin

Far well known is the next artist, HANK LOCKLIN, who during the early-to-mid ’50s cut a good amount of boppers. Here’s on 4 Star 1641, the fine bopper (steel and guitar solo, over a good voice, a bit like Hank Williams) : « I’m Tired Of Buming Arond ». . Later Locklin turned to pop country, like his Statemate Jim Reeves ; nevertheless his products on 4 Star are well worth looking for.

Forrest Lee And Cleet Stewart

« When I Hold You », a fast bopper with unison chorus, piano and fiddle, is to be found of the rare and small California label Chesterfield # 353 : FOREST LEE & CLEET STEWART are the artists, backed b a very young Buck Owens on guitar.

On the major Decca label (# 46361, from 1954) I am releasing « Give Me An C. Cola And A Moon Pie » (what a title) by LONZO & OSCAR. A fast bopper : mandolin solo, also fiddle – the whole song is joyful. One of my first experiences to bopping music during the ’70s. One of the two artists (I don’t know who) had a later career under the name of Ken Marvin.

Lonzo & Oscar

Neal Jones

A shuffler now (good fiddle) by a Texas artist, NEAL JONES, released at the end of Columbia 20000 serie : # 21415 : « I’m Playing It Cool » from 1955, a loose and free track.

Reggie Ward

On Nemo 1005, and from January 1951, an uptempo, joyful bopper with « Juke Box Baby » by REGGIE WARD & His Sons Of Texas. Vocal duty is held by Jack Ford. One can wonder if this is the same that came out later, e.g. on the Chess 4800 serie (1955-1956).

Tennessee Jim

From Kansas City, MO. now comes TENNESSEE JIM (McDonald). He does a fine uptempo with good solos (guitar, steel and fiddle) with « Hanging Out My Tears To Dry » on the Choice label # 846.

download

Hardrock Gunter>

Finally the well-known Alabamian.Sidney « HARDROCK » GUNTER, who was never reviewed in bopping. Here he is with « Hesitation Boogie » published January 1951 on Decca 46383, a solid bopper : great piano, guitar and prepossing vocal for this invitation the dance.

/span>Sources : my own archives ; Columbia files (W. Agenant for Neal Jones) ; 45 of the Ohio River (Jimmy Settle label) ; Bert Martins tapes (held back since the 1970s!) for Lonzo & Oscar ; Country Hicks 2 LP for Abe Heap, 7 for Tenn. Jim ; Bopping Hillbillies serie : 11 (Reggie Ward), 17 (Forrest Lee)

Late June 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks.

The first three releases were all done on the West coast and published by Capitol records, the big California concern.Then at the end of the selection, here are more Little Richard tunes, some very rare. Enjoy!

Billy Strange

The multi-session guitar player BILLY STRANGE (1930-2012) sang a truck driver’s song in 1952, « Diesel Smoke, Dangerous Curves », complete with truck honkers effects, braking grinding sounds and woman’s yellings, which goes faster and faster until the final break. (Capitol 2032).

Cliffie Stone

Then the ubiquitous CLIFFIE STONE, bass player, bandleader and entertainer (Hometown Jamboree) for the jumping, jiving « Jump Rope Boogie »  (Capitol 1496).

Third Capitol exposure goes with OLE RASMUSSEN, leader of the Nebraska Corn Hunters. Defintely a Western flavoured Hillbilly. Medium paced « Gonna See My Sunday Baby Tonight ».(Capitol 1323). lazy vocal with yells to the backing musicians.

Hoyt Scoggins & The Georgia Boys

On a Starday Custom serie # 606 (from January 1957), the very nice, fast « What’s The Price  (To, Set Me Free » by HOYT SCOGGINS & His Georgia Boys. An agile guitar, on a very fast Hillbilly boogie. A splendid track..

Jim Harless & the Lonesome Valley Boys

JIM HARLESS next one, from Bristol, TN in a mix-up of Hillbilly and Bluegrass (good banjo all through) for « Rock’n’Roll Fever Ain’t Got Me ». A bit of fiddle and a strong rhythm guitar.(Shadow 104, unknown date).

Ted Brooks

It’s impossible to fix which version came first on of « The Hot Guitar », either by Eddie Hill on Mercury 6374 (backed by MM. Chet Atkins and Hank Garland) or by TED BROOKS (Vocal by Henry Kimbrell) on Decca 46374, both issued in October 1951. Guitar tour-de-force in both cases.

Rick Rickels

A double-sider Rockabilly now with the mysterious RICK RICKELS (& His Wild Guitar) on the MH label, late ’50s or early 60s. « I’m Gone » and « You Gonna Go Away » are both frantic rockabillies,

Ray Coats, Cotton Collins & his Ranch Boys

Finally RAY COATS, backed by Cotton Collins & His Ranch Boys for the fine bluesy bopper « Texas Blues » (1953, on the Shamrock label, no #) from Houston, Texas. A fine steel (solo), a lazy vocal, and a good rinky-dink piano.

Sources : 45world (for 78rpm label scans), old Tom Sims’ cassette (Ole Rasmussen, Jim Harless, Ray Coats), RCS for Rick Rickels’ label scans (where came the soundfiles from, I can’t remember..) ; Ted Brooks from 78-Ron ; Hoyt Scoggins from the Starday Project (Malcolm Chapman among others).

And now for the last time, here are some more Little Richard’s rarities.
– “Taxi Blues”, 1951;
– “Little Richard’s Boogie” (1953) with the Johnny Oui Orchestra;
– “Valley Of tears” (1961) with the Upsetters;
– “Ytavelin’ Shoes” from 1963;

More sides
– I’m Back” from the comeback (1965)
– “Hurry Sundown”, from the motion of the same name (1967)
– “Rockin’ Chair”, cut in January 1967
– “Dew Stop Inn”, last entry in the charts (1971)

Early June 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello everyone ! In those times of confinement, it’s good to hear fresh bopping music. Because my hard-disk is out of service and that the repair shop is still closed, I chose ancient items, previously released in old Fortnight’s favorites selections. So they won’t ring too familiar.

T. Texas Tyler

The first selection is done by T. TEXAS TYLER : a fast « Sratch and Itch » done in 1953 on 4Star, leased to Decca. 28760. Obviously there is not much growls from Tyler in this one. The backing is suoperb.

The veteran TEX RITTER (1906-1974) did also some Hillbilly bop songs. Here he releaes « Boogie Woogie Cowboy » on Capitol 928 (from early 1950). The backing provided is excellent too : the Capitol nucleus band, Eddie Kirk and Merle Travis on guitars, Speedy West on steel, Cliffie Stone on bass, Billy Liebert on piano and Harold Hensley on fiddle.

Tex Ritter

Chuck Wells

CHUCK WELLS (1922-1997) was a native of Birmingham, Alabama. He found his musical success in Texas, working at several night spots throughout the Fort Worth area. He was also appearing over radio stations KCNC and KCUL in Fort Worth, too. Here he sings (1953) the great shuffler « The Marryin’ Preacher Man » on Columbia 23212.

Tony Farr

From Texas comes TONY FARR. He had two discs on Enterprise, among them the second is the better. : « There’s No Sense In Marrying Me ».
This artist, billed “And His Swinging Guitar”, based in Beaumont, Texas. “What’s The Use” has a nice guitar, but the fiddle is prominent (# 1208) on this 1958 issue, while “There’s No else In Marrying Me” (# 1211) is a jumping tune with a similar instrumentation.

Then in Louisiana’s West Monroe. Jiffy was a short-lived affair, however important by the quality of its issues, and the celebrity of some names, Jimmy Pickard, Tommy Spurlin or Jimmy Simpson. Here is the least known ED RAYBORN & his Southern Hillbillies, and the good medium paced « I’ll go on hurting » (# 208). Nice fiddle/steel and sincere vocal.

Ed Rayborn

Jerry Dove

A couple of years later or so, a man led a typical Hillbilly combo : JERRY DOVE (instrument unknown). He had already put a minor rockabilly classic in 1956, « Pink bow tie » on T.N.T. Label (# 144), but he was more a producer and musician than a singer. Here he gathers the duet (male/female) of Ray Stone and Dove’s wife, Peggy. The side is bluesy, and very atmospheric : « Losin’ the blues » (# 173)

Guy Gardner

On Dixie 1068 (1961) by GUY GARDNER & his Country Four, here’s «High Society», an uptempo ballad : jumping vocal and instrumentation (piano and steel). Madison, TN label (sublabel to Starday).

Doug Davis

With « All by myself » by DOUG DAVIS on the Texan Nite star label (# 007, from ca. 1963), we touch the real thing ! Already posted in 2010, this time with a nice label scan. It has haunting steel, perfect ballad vocal and confident backing (steel, rhythm only). My prefered all-time ballad. Davis had another record on Malinda 113 (untraced)

Sources: mainly from past Fortnight’s issues. See through “Artists” for details given before.

As an add and to continue with my homage to the late

LITTLE RICHARD

, here are some more tracks from his long career.

First, a short instrumental, “Cavalcade” cut at the very last session for Specialty (October 1957) which gave éShe Knows How To Rock”, “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On” and “Hound Dog”.

From his Gospel days, I chose the loud, brassy, rollicking “He Got What He Wanted”, cut in 1962 for Mercury records.

From July 1964 and his real comeback album on Vee-Jay, here’s a real blues – so rare in his entire career. « Going Home Tomorrow» is sung with a lot of spirit. Richard is backed by an old friend on electric fiddle, Don « Sugarcane » Harris – who was also there for « Bama Lama Bama Lou » in April of the same year (last Specialty cut). The guitar player may also be Dewey Terry.

From 1965, a small hit (climbing in the lower parts of the R&B charts), “I Don’t Know What You’ve Got, But It’s Got Me”, released by Vee-Jay. The organ is played by a young Billy Preston) and the guitar player is a certain Maurice James, who was about to change his name at his arrival on the British shoreJimi Hendrix, after having been fired by Richard.I

In 1969, during a T.V. show, here’s a frenetic live version of “True Fine Mama”.

From 1971, as a backing piano player for Delaney Bramlett (of Delaney & Bonnie duet), Richard pounds the piano on “Miss Ann”, released by Atco Records.

Finally, from unknown sources, a berserk wildie version of “Good Golly Mss Molly”, maybe cut for a film, while Richard is duetting in 1992 with Tanya Tucker for a great interpretation of the classic Eddie Cochran’s song “Something Else”.

Early May 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! Let’s embark for a new journey into bopping music ! It begins in the late forties and extends until 1965, with an emphasis for the 1954-59 period.

T. Texas Tyler & the Oklahoma Boys

T. TEXAS TYLER & his Oklahoma Boys were a very popular outfit in California during the late ’40s. Here the man « with a million friends » deliver a really hot instrumental « Guitar Boogie Woogie » on 4Star 1114 (recorded May 1946) : a fast, furious guitar showcase (James Pruett or Stan Walker) (plus a steel solo by Joaquin Murphy).

Eddy Raven

Twenty years later EDDY MARVIN, also on a Fort Worth, Tx. label (Oakridge # 117) offers a downhome shuffling bopper. Good piano, cool vocal in « I’m Packing My Duds & I’m Head-in South ».

Bill Goodwin

Here’s a Starday custom, issued on the main label in the 500 serie. Starday 710 by BILL GOODWIN. April 1958 « Teenage Blues », a fast number with Rockabilly guitar. Later on, Goodwin was also on the Starday sublabel Dixie # 2014 (1959) ; with his Western Ramblers,he did « Your Lying Ways ». A bopper with great guitar.

David Gates

The Oklahoma born DAVID GATES, for his second record (the first was issued by Mala), on East-West 123 (a sublabel of the giant Atlantic outlet) : « Swingin’ Baby Doll » is really bopping and rolling. (February 1959)

Clyde Moody

CLYDE MOODY (1915-1989) was the King of Waltzes ; he also had several good boppers, as this « Tend To Your Business » on King 977. It’s a bluesy mid-paced hillbilly tune, piano and fiddle .

Cash Box July 14, 1951

Sandy Walker & His Country Boys

Back to California with SANDY WALKER’s back-to-back sides of Sage 227 (November 1956). Two uptempos : steel, fiddle, piano solos for « Beatin’ Round The Bush » and « So Long Baby Blues ».

Jeanie Pierson

At last a woman ! JEANIE PIERSON from White Cloud, Kansas, came up in Nashville in 1953, providing her solid version of Lefty’s « Run ‘Em Off » (co-written by Onie Wheeler)(Decca 28967).

Cash Box Dec. 28, 1953

Big Bill Lister

Finally a long-time Hank W. impersonator, BIG BILL LISTER, does offer « Countryfied » on Capitol 1551 (June 1951). An uptempo with fiddle, by the way Hank’s styled.

Sources : Country Hicks LP (Eddy Marvin) ; HillbillyBoogie1 YouTube chain (Jeanie Pierson), 4 Star Starday Custom serie (Bill Goodwin) ; Praguefrank (T. Texas Tyler data) ; my own archives from anywhere, piled up through the years..