Late November 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks! Here is the more recent selection of fortnight’s favorites. Hope you will find something of interest here.

>The Tennessee Drifers

The TENNESSEE DRIFERS were a small outfit, whose main instrument was a piano. The vocalist was either George Toon, either Billy Hardison, and they released three nice fast tracks on Dot : « Mean Ole Boogie » ( # 1098, from 1951), and « Boogie Woogie Baby»/ »Drive Those Blues Away » (1953 on Dot 1166). Great hillbilly bopping piano. At times, Tommy Moreland (remember the great « The Drifter » n Maid 1000, released in November 2018 fortnight’s favorites) was among the members.At a very later date (1961), George Toon and the Tennessee Drifters released a pop-country effort, “Those Fairy Tales” (Unamic 4501). The track is posted only for comparison with their better early ’50s bopping sides!

Rooster Swan

Internet is a a firm place to unearth some new music. Here’s a demo of « Honky Tonk Girl » by ROOSTER SWAN from 1957. A rhythm guitar then a lead for a short solo plus vocal of course. The song does last for less than a minute but is a pleasant bopper.

Keith Anderson & the Ohio Valley Boys

KEITH ANDERSON is famous for his ’60s sides on Cozy, like « Hot Guitars » (Cozy 12/13). Here he is with an earlier side, « Locked Up Again » with Ohio Valley Boys, on a New Martinsville, WVa. Ran-Dell label # 934. It’s a sort of rocking ballad – good steel and extrovert vocal (1961).

Elva Carver with Pat Kingery & the Kentuckians

Out of Scottsville, Ky, the Goldenrod label issued several Rockabilly classics (remember Harold Shutters). Here’s ELVA CARVER with Pat Kingery & the Kentuckians for « Two-Toned Love » from 1956. Good fiddle and electrifying mandolin over a nice female vocal.

The Western Cherokees

The Western Cherokees backed in recording sessions and on stage Lefty Frizzell from 1950 to 1952. They were led by Robert Lawrence « BLACKIE » CRAWFORD, guitar player. They had in their own right sides cut on Coral then Starday. Here is « Jump Jack Jump » on Coral 64138. Great and fast hillbilly bopper out of Texas. A further side is an equally good, lowdown shuffler, « Baby Buggy Blues » (Coral 64118).

Happy Wainwright

Then HAPPY WAINWRIGHT on a 1961 disc, « Nothing But Love » (Carma 505, out of Kenner, La.). It’s a belter – good steel throughout.

Sources: sometimes YouTube (Eva Carver, Keith Anderson, Rooster Swan); from Ohio River 45’s: Blackie Crawford : songs from HBR series; picture from Hillbilly.com. My own collection for Tennessee Drifters on Dot, “Boogie Beat Rag” comes from Karl-Heinz Focke – thanks to him.

Early November 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello everyone ! This is the selection for early November 2019 fortnight’s favorites. Every track will be within the 1954-57 period, except the odd item from early ’60s or even later.

Riley Crabtree

RILEY CRABTREE was born in Mount Pleasant, TX in 1921, and followed first the steps of Jimmie Rodgers on his Talent sides from 1949. Later he adopted the Hank’s pattern, and was an affiliate of the Dallas’ Big Jamboree. Here on the very small Ekko label, he’s backed by the young Cochran Brothers Eddie and Hank for the bluesy strong « Meet Me At Joe’s » (# 1019) from late 1955. Nice piano, and of course fine guitar.

In 1957, he emerges on the Dallas’ Country Picnic label (# 602) with the fast « Tattle Tattle Tale ». Great ‘bar room’ piano, a good steel, and a Scotty Moore styled solo. Crabtree was confined on a wheel chair, and died in 1984 from a fire caused by an electric blanket.

Cash Box Oct. 12, 1957

In 1970 SHORTY BACON released his version of the Billy Barton small classic « A Day Late And A Dollar Short » on the Chart label # 5104. Despite the late period, it’s a nice country-rocker : great fiddle and steel are battling.

Walter Scott

Way up North on the Ruby label (first issue, # 100 out of Hamilton, OH) then WALTER SCOTT and the really fine bopper « I’m Walking Out » : a lovely swirling fiddle and a surprisingly good banjo. Scott had also « Somebody’s Girl » on an Audio Lab EP 35 (untraced).

Red Hays

‘RED’ HAYS (also sometimes named Joe ‘Red’ Hayes) was a fiddler as early as 1950 in the Jack Rhodes’ band in Mineola, TX. He offers here a nice and fast « Doggone Woman » on Starday 164 from October 1954. Good vocal for this jumping call-and-response bopper ; of course a fiddle solo, and all the way through a bass chords played guitar. The flipside « A Satisfied Mind » (a very sincere ballad) was covered first by Porter Wagoner, then had nearly 100 versions, among them Jean Shepard Capitol 3118), even Joan Baez’s or David Allan Coe’s. Hayes – according him being the same artist – went later on Capitol in 1956 for a ballad more (« I’ll Be So Good To You », # 3382 and an uptempo « Every Little Bit », # 3550).

DeLuxe was apparently a short-lived, small sublabel to the giant King, which issued some fine music. I’ve selected « Strange Feeling » by JIMMY THORPE (# 2006, from December 1953), who was seemingly more at ease with lowdown and medium-paced items (DeLuxe 2016 and 2018). Here is a solid bopper, although not a fast one. Good assured vocal and guitar, and a nice fiddle solo.

Bobby Lile

On the West coast, on the Sage label in 1956, BOBBY LILE « with music by Bob and Laverne » (who are they?) delivers « Don’t You Believe It » (# 222), a fine fast tune. The guitar player reminds me a bit at times of the great Joe Maphis – although it’s definitely not him there.

He was on the C&W serie of the big New Jersey concern Savoy, and bopping.org featured RAY GODFREY and his « Overall Song » (Savoy 3021) in the March 2013 fortnight’s favorites. Not a great singer, he had a good uptempo (« Wait Weep And Wonder ») on Peach 757, then the pop-country « If The Good Lord’s Willing » on Tollie 9030. Here he releases on the Yonah label # 2002 (March 1961) the passable « The Postman Brought The Blues » (good early 60s styled steel and fiddle).

Danny Reeves

Finally a very good double-sided country-rocker by Houstonian DANNY REEVES on ‘D’ 1206 (between July and September 1961). A nice baritone voice for the fast « I’m A Hobo » (great although too short guitar solo, very sounding 1956) and a fine guitar for « Bell Hop Blues ». This record was recently auctioned at $ 760 ! Reeves had also in 1975 his own version (untraced) of « My Bucket’s Got A Whole In It ». Before that he released in 1962 the double-sided rocker “Spunky Monkey/Love Grows” (San 1509) and, at an unknown date, the Countryish “Little Red Coat” on the obscure label L. G.Gregg 1001.

Sources : « Armadillo Killer » for Ray Godfrey ; Google images and the Starday project for Red Hays. Jimmy Thorpe from HBR # 50  Walter Scott and Shorty Bacon found on YouTube and Ohio River 45s site  Riley Crabtree from an HMC compilation; Gripsweat for Danny Reeves San issue.

Late October 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello, this is the late October 2019 favorites’ selection, and very different things this time.

These are two tracks of the nearest JIMMY MURPHY ever bordered to Rockabilly. A veteran (his 1951 sides on RCA-Victor) of Country bluesy sides, with an appeal to religious ones, like « Electricity ».(RCA 21-0447), and his two-sided November 1955 « Here Kitty Kitty »/ »I’m Looking For A Mustard Patch » (Columbia 21486) sounded (with Onie Wheeler on harmonica) as if they had been recorded in..1945. That was the main problem for Jimmy Murphy, always behind the times. Nevertheless great acoustic guitar and assured,vocal. A must for Rockabilly fans.

Next HANK CADWELL and the Saddle Kings on the West coast D’Oro label (# 103) do come with a Western swing tinged opus, « Alibi » from late ’40s : accordion solo, fiddle solo, lovely assured vocal and chorus.

Then ABE LINK, or A. BLINK (he went under both names) on the Ohio Canton label. « Skeleton Bookie », « and the Western Spotlighters » (S.T.R.C Canton 106) has beautiful steel effects for a Halloween (?) disc, while « Yodelin’ Blues » (Canton 107) is very different. A classic shuffling bopper from 1955. Lot of yodel of course, and a lot less steel.

We jump to 1961 for a male duet. A nice country-rocker by PHIL BEASLEY and CHARLEY BROWN on the Briar (# 111) label, from unknown location. « Good Gosh Gal » has loud drums, and a nice guitar throughout (a fine solo).

On the B.W. label (location unknown), here’s KENNY BIGGS (B.W. 615) for a nice Country-rocker « There’s No Excuse » (early ’60s). One expects in this very melodic tune some chorus (very unobstrusive if ever present).

Col. Tom Parker paid the Norfolk, Va. and Jacksonville, Fl. radio stations not to play PHIL GRAY’s disc on Rhythm 101, and even gathered the copies to destroy from a too Elvisy (Sun style) Rockabilly. He even had done to prevent Gene Vincent to be unplayed in vain. Gray was 15 years old when he cut « Pepper Hot Baby » and « Bluest Boy In Town ». Great guitar, Elvis-style hiccups (the song is like « Baby Let’s Play House »), a real success. This disc is so rare that a copy, when it comes on auction, may get as high as $ 3000 !

Finally a romper with AMOS MILBURN and his great rendition of the Don Raye’s classic, « Down The Road Apiece » (Aladdin 161, 1946-47). Great vocal, fabulous boogie piano.

Sources : YouTube ; 45cat, 78worlds, various compilations, W. Agenant « Columbia 20000 » serie, Gripsweat (A. Blink)

Early October 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks. Here is the early October 2019 fortnight’s favorites selection. There will be a unusual amount of records on major labels, all cut between 1955 and 57.

He had first appeared in the late August 2016 fortnight’s selection for « Big Money » (1956) and the original of « Six Days On The Road » (1961). Here is the return of PAUL DAVIS for his second release on M-G-M (# 12209). « I’m On The Loose » is also a solid bopper, cut in July 1955.

A nice combination of bass, mandolin (probably) and fiddle is backing « I’ll Be Broken Hearted » by HYLO BROWN on Capitol 3448 – a medium uptempo weeper from June 1956.

Cash Box sept. 9, 1956

Buddy Shaw

Now on a Starday Custom (# 643, from June 1957) by BUDDY SHAW and the minor classic « Don’t Sweep That Dirt On Me ». A fast rockabilly, typical in Starday sound (guitar and piano are battling). Shaw had aslo Starday 609 (« No More ») and 618, similar style.

Bill Dudley

An intimate vocal on an uptempo rhythm, with prominent fiddle and an insistant rhythm guitar for BILL DUDLEY and « Wailing Wall » released on Capitol 2531.

On RCA-Victor 47-6147 now, BUDDY THOMPSON does offer « Don’t Kindle Up The Flame » : a mad fiddle (solo), a good steel solo, a fast bopping piano – a nice tune (June 1955). Thompson went later on Atco for Rock’n’Roll sides.

Cash Box 18 June, 1955

Stan Hardin

Two sides by STAN HARDIN from June 1957, and the surprisingly Hank Williams styled « Hungry Heart » : an uptempo shuffler with fiddle and steel. « Give Me All Your Lovin’, Baby », the flpside, is a fast bopper with energetic vocal. Decca 30302, obviousy backed by the Nashville cream of musicians.

Alvadean Coker

Finally a female bopper, ALVADEAN COKER and her « We’re Gonna Bop » (1955). A call-and-response format for a jumping bopper. A nice one. To be found on Abbott 173.

Sources: mainly Internet.

Late September 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks ! This is the late September 2019 bopping fortnight’s selection (9
records).

First we have TROY JORDAN & his Cross-B-Boys from Midland, Tx. There’s a joyful uptempo with piano – steel barely audible, plus a fiddle solo : « Who Flung That Mater » on Tred-Way 100.

Now here’s JIM HAND with the Mountain Ramblers – although the disc comes from NYC. A bit crooning 1947 goodie ; discreet steel and an accordion solo for « There’s No One Home » on Crown 156. Jordan had also «  Columbus Stockade Blues »  on the flipside (untraced).

ARCHIE JEFFERIES and the Blue Flame Boys, probably from the West coast, are doing on a 4* Custom Blue Flame (OP-107) label, « G. I. Talking Blues », a decent bopper from 1950 with rinky-dink piano and steel. Flipside « One For The Money, Two For The Show » is a good mellow bopper.

From Detroit, MI comes CAL DAVIS. He sings a bluesy, well sung, convincing « Loving Lifetime » on the Mack # 25 label. Good fiddle.

TOMMY KIZZIAH & the West Coast Ramblers give us « Two Timing Kind », an uptempo bopper, a good guitar throughout and a lot of fiddle on another 4* custom, Pearl label (# 203).

« Red’s boogie » is done by OZARK RED (rn. Red Murrell) and his Ozark Mountain Boys : a very good instrumental, a bit Western in style – agile guitar and good piano backing. It’s to be found on Cavalier 811.

Finally SMOKEY WARD and « Dog Bite Yo’ Hide » : prominent fiddle and forceful Bluegrass vocal (chorus), a nice and fast mandolin solo, on Barrel Head Gang 1001 released June 1951.

Sources : YouTube mainly ; also photograph of Tommy Kizziah from the book « A star that winkled but never got to shine » (Sharon Kizziah-Holmes)

Early September 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

I don’t know where DON WINTERS hailed from, probably Nashville. He has during the mid-’50s several good discs.

On RCA-Victor 47-6154 first he asked his Lady « Forgive My Mistakes » : a nice shuffler – piano, steel solo and an extrovert, really sincere vocal.
A later side (RCA 6348) « One Way Is Bound To Be Right » finds him, in a faster rhythm. A pleasant side.

Finally he embarked Rockabilly bandwagon with a release on Coin # 102 : « Be My Baby, Baby » is still Hillbilly Bop, but almost Rockabilly. The collectors couldn’t be mistaken. The Coin issue is valued at $ 150-200. Flipside « Pretty Moon » is pure heaven Rockabilly with its urgent vocal.

A typical Honky tonker from 1956 comes next with BILL WIMBERLY and his Country Rhythm Boys : « You Can’t Lean On Me » has a good steel (solo) and fiddle. A pretty nice record for the era. Mercury 70900. Just a few months earlier (February) Wimbery had released (Mercury 70815) « Ole Mister Cottontail » and on the flipside a lively instrumental « Country Rhythm ». Later on he was on Starday (« Back Street »).

Is it useful to develop on AL TERRY ? He’s already known since 1953 for his first sides on Feature and Champion. Here he is in July 1956 on the Hickory (# 1056) label out of Nashville for a typical mid-tempo Honky tonk bordering Rockabilly, « Roughneck Blues ». A lazy vocal and the lead guitar played by none other than Grady Martin.

Casho Box, Nov. 10, 1956

We jump back in May 1954 for a real ‘tour-de-force’ by the Father of Bluegrass, BILL MONROE : here it’s his « Whitehouse Blues » (Decca 29141). It’s the FASTEST Bluegrass tune ever.

Finally from Texas in 1956 a jumping little Rockabilly bopper with “Dig Them Squeaky Shoes » by FRANK STARR on the Lin label # 1009.

Sources : my own archives ; YouTube ; various compilations.