Washington bopping: the Howington Brothers & their Tennessee Haymakers (1948-1964)

The Howington Brothers (Charles « Dub », lead guitar and Roy, bass) were a Washington D.C. act which was signed by Mrs. Lillian Clayborne on his D.C. label. D.C. did mean at the same time ‘District of Columbia’ and ‘D'[for Haskell Davis, publisher]- ‘C'[for Lillian Clayborne, owner of D.C. Records]. Between 1948 and 1950, they cut a dozen sides collector Phillip Tricker called ‘corny’, under the name « HOWINGTON BROTHERS with Their Tennessee Haymakers ». Two of them were issued moreover on the giant Atlantic Records R&B outlet of NYC, and two more on Loop Records, possibly a sublabel to D.C. Their personnel is not entirely known, but consisted of Brownie Galloway on guitar, and a young Jimmy Dean on accordion, plus Herbie Jones on rhythm guitar and George Saslaw (unknown instrument, but steel and mandolin are present on their discs). Later on they went to Decca and Quincy, and even backed George Saslaw on a 60’s Western disc. They came during a burgeoning East Coast Hillbilly scene during 1944-46, which saw WFIL, a powerful Philadelphia station, launch very late 1944 the Saturday night « Hayloft Jamboree » : an immediate success, so much so that American Broadcasting System approached WHIL and they broadcast from mid-1945 the show from coast to coast.

Actually it may well be that Ivin Balle, boss of Gotham, recorded the Howingtons in Philadelphia, then leased the masters to Mrs. Clayborne, according to Phillip Tricker, and the mention on DC 4102A.

A good amount of the Howington Brothers material was made of instrumentals, but vocal duties were shared between Dub and Roy. First D.C. issue by them was a novelty, « Roll The Patrol » (next to the curb, ’cause grandma can’t step that high), which was well received in late 1948 (DC # 4102). This song may well have been connected to another WFIL programme, on an all night hillbilly show called « The Dawn Patrol ». Could it have been used as the theme music ? B-side is a fast « Dub’s Polka », an instrumental showcasing Dub’s agility on guitar, then young Jimmy Dean’s shining on accordion.

“regular” copy?

Billboard – December 18, 1948

 

 

 

 

 

 

Billboard, Jan. 18, 1949

Roll The Patrol

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Dub’s Polka

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Same format goes for the second offering (# 4106) with a dynamite « Dub’s Double Boogie » (bass chords guitar of Dub), while « The Letter Edged In Black » is sung in unison, and is rather a tame uptempo ballad.

Dubs Double Boogie

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The Letter Edged In Black

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DC # 4107 sees the arrival of a fiddle (Speedy Baker) for the traditional « Boil ‘Em Cabbage Down » with a short accordion solo. Again vocal refrain is in unison, and fiddle part is a real feat. The B-side « Don’t Play With Love » is a typical late ’40s uptempo Hillbilly song : Dub is in fine voice (even whistles, by Frank Porter), as his throbbing guitar. Accordion and fiddle do their best for a good rendition. This song must have been a valued one, because it will be re-recorded on Quincy a mere 8 years later.

Boil ‘Em Cabbage Down

download               Don’t Play With Love”

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We found the Howington Brothers on a Loop release (# 903) from 1949, which seems to be a sublabel to D.C. They do a terrific instrumental, « Haymaker’s Shuffle » and a Roy Howington vocal (« and His Rhythm Boys , Chuck Frazer, Solo Guitar ») (a forgettable weeper) on «A Wondeful Dream ».

 

Billboard, December 17, 1949

Haymaker’s Shuffle

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A Wonderful Dream

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In April or June 1950 Mrs. Clayborne leased some 20 masters to Atlantic, to be issued in their ‘Folk & Western Serie‘ (# 700). For an unknown reason, only the Howington Brothers ‘& His Tennessee Haymakers‘ [as shown on the Atlantic label] had a record issued under the prestigious label, although quite unusual for Hillblly music. Only are known of 7 releases in this serie, and someday bopping.org will tell you its story (maybe other Atlantic serie tunes were of D.C. origin?) Anyway the Howingtons once more have an A-side, « I’m On Pins And Needles », an uptempo although quite ordinary tune, while the flipside is a fast polka-type song, « Alabama Jubilee » : it shows a very, very nice guitar, plus a welcome slap-bass solo. There remains an unissued song, « Road Of Heartaches », nobody can comment. Although this song resurfaced on the Quincy label years later.

“I’m On Pins And Needles”

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“Alabama Jubilee”

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The next pairing was issued in May 1952 (but obviously recorded much earlier) and saw « Our Shotgun Weddin’ Day », a great, fast Hillbilly bop opus issued on DC # 4114 (vocal by Roy Howington). Reverse side is another instrumental, aptly named « Easy Pickin’ ». Meanwhile I found a snippet in Billboard mentioning an issue on Loop 4113 with « Haymaker’s Shuffle » and « Hillbilly Wolf », but couldn’t find more details, nor the music or labels. It’s well worth noting that Billy Strickland cut in 1949 on Sylvan (reissued on Regal 5067) a song called « Hillbilly Wolf », written by ‘[Ben] Adelman’, who was the direct partner in Washington of Mrs. Clayborne ; so the link is, albeit tenuous, an interesting one.

 

Our Shotgun Weddin’ Day

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Easy Pickin’

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Billy Strickland and the Hillbilly Kings (!), “Hillbilly Wolf”

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Dub Howington is noted in a snippet of the ‘Journal of Country Music‘ (1987) as entertaining New Year’s Eve 1951 : «Dub Howington and the Tennessee Haymakers. The show was aired regionally as part of the Gunther network and, along with Gunther Beer, the show was sponsored by Otho Williams’ Buick and L&M cigarettes. There’s no doubt that for country music, for dancing, drinking, and chasing skirts (or jeans), the place to be on Saturday night was Turner’s Arena »

We jump to 1953, and the recording session the Howington Brothers had in Nashville (July 19) for Decca Records, which provided 4 tunes, 4 Hillbilly Boppers of very high standard : « Tennessee Rooster Fight » has, as awaited, roosters cock-a-doodling and a-hooping, while the fast « Two Faced » goes on with hillbilly humor (great guitar and fiddle) (Decca # 28550). The remaining two sides of the session, « I Got Mine » and « Should I Shoud, should I Shouldn’t » keep the same format, and are equally good boppers (Decca # 29225).

 

 

 

 

 

Tennessee Rooster Fight

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Two Faced”

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“I Got Mine

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Should I Should, Should I Shouldn’t”

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Next record the Howingtons were involved in is that of Luke Gordon singing « Goin’ Crazy » (L&C 550, later reissued with the same # on Starday) ; not suprisingly, since they were Washingtonians and relocated in Virginia (Bristol – see the Billboard snippet on left), and Gordon was a Virginian. Luke

served in the US. Army during the Korean conflict and upon his discharge in 1953 headed for Norfolk, Virginia. After a stint in Tennessee he returned to Virginia and the Washington D.C. area to work with fiddler Homer ‘Curley’ Smith at radio station WGAY, Silver Springs, Maryland and do personal appearances. Curley set up a number of recording sessions for Luke with Ben Adelman and the result was released on L & C and Starday during 1956. Dub Howington played lead on «Goin’ Crazy» ; other members however of the « Tennessee Haymakers » as shown on the label were stranger to original Haymakers. The Luke Gordon “official” site quotes Buzz Busby (mandolin – absolutely inaudible), Homer ‘Curley’ Smith (fiddle), Don West (steel) and Jimmy Stoneman (st-bass). I am propounding in contrary the following personnel: Dub Howington on lead-guitar, George Saslaw on steel, Roy Howington on string bass, and of course ‘Curley’ Smith on fiddle, obviously not forgetting  Luke Gordon on singing and rhythm guitar. The session could have been held on April 16, 1955. The reverse side has nothing to do however with the Tennessee Haymakers.

Luke GordonGoin’ Crazy” (L&C 550, April 1955)

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Jimmy Dean

Howington and Gordon joined the newly formed Washington D.C. Saturday night show (aired by WMAL radio station) and guested regularly with Jimmy Dean, already signed to 4-Star Records.

Then Dub Howington did follow Luke Gordon on his own Quincy label, out of the same name town in Kentucky, and cut (in Cincinnati?): «Road Of Heartaches» (this was a revamp of the unissued Atlantic recording of 8 years before) and «Don’t Play With Love» (which had already been used a first time on D.C. 4107). Former tune was a good medium bopper, while the latter was a Rockabilly of high octane. The Howingtons were recycling old material into new stuff! The Quincy 45′ (# 934) is sold between $ 100-125, according to Barry K. John’s book.

Road Of Heartaches

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Don’t Play With Love

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Dub Howington also backed Luke Gordon on his second Quincy issue (# 933) coupling two fine boppers, « The Fool That I Am » and « Mustache On A Cabbage head » both cut in 1958, but was not involved in the B-side of the L&C 550 « Don’t Cramp My Style ».

The Fool That I Am”

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Mustache On The Cabbage Head

After this record the Howington’s disappeared from music scene to just reappear a mere 8 years later (1964) on the N.Y.C. Crossroads label (# 400). They then backed George Saslaw, one of the members of the first hour (1948) on the old hit tune «Ma, He’s Making Eyes At Me». This very fast version is done Western swing style and sounds very nice, with guitar and steel battling each other.

George Saslaw, “Ma, He’s Making Eyes At Me

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After this last single, I am losing the track of the Howington Brothers. Quite a fair achievement after a 25 years long career.

Sources : mainly DC, Loop and Decca files (sound and scans) from Ronald Keppner’s collection – thanks to him for the care taken at copying those rare records out of his huge and precious collection. Even the odd cassette replacing a broken 78rpm ! The rest does come from my researches and archives. Personal pictures taken from the net or a past Blues & Rhythm magazine issue. Of great help was also the site devoted to Luke Gordon: http://www.hankwilliamslistings.com/ind-lug4.htm, even if I disagree with some details. Any comment or addition/correction welcome!

“Cornfed Fred”: the story of boppin’ FRED CRAWFORD (1953-1960)

Every region of the country had their local star- that person that teetered on the brink of stardom. Radio deejay. Recording artist. Performer. Promoter. Talent scout. Music Publisher. Maybe they ran their own label. Sometimes a studio.

They ALWAYS seemed to be one step away from finally making it…. just one step away.

Our local guy was Fred Crawford.

Billboard June 2, 1956

Like many I was first ushered to Fred through the 1956 Starday release “Rock Candy Rock” (# 243), a steady little piano/guitar jiver that has unfortunately overshadowed his stronger country/hillbilly efforts. On the same disc, the B-side “Secret of my heart” is back to Crawford’s hillbilly roots: it is a solid medium paced very strong opus.

Rock Candy Rock” (Starday 243)

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Secret of my heart” (Starday 243)
Fred Crawford "Secret of my heart"

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I’m not sure when Fred first began his professional career. His obituary mentioned that as an 11 year old he had “You Are My Shine“‘d his way to a talent show victory on Shreveport’s KWKH. Also mentioned in the same obituary is that by age 25 his recording career was underway. Would assume this would have included his incredibly rare 4-Star custom press, « My inky Dinky baby/Empty feeling in my heart » (Promotional OP-163, from 1953) – it may even appear this record was never issued, as no one has ever seen a copy.

Not mentioned is that Fred had a decent string of excellent releases on the infamous Starday label, all of which are WELL worth tracking down. The rockabilly of “Rock Candy Rock” stands in contrast to his other releases for the label. As does the pop effort “By The Mission Wall“, notable for being recorded in Clovis with Norman Petty producing, Buddy Holly playing guitar, and the Bowman Brothers providing back-up vocals.

Fred Crawford "By the mission wall"By the mission wall”(St 314)Fred Crawford "By the mission walls"

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. Obviously he had great hopes in “By the Mission Wall” as it was recorded again for AOK. While a song « Hey little waitress » (AOK 1034) was an inspiring song which was cut once more on Westex in 1966. His swan song, full of emotion, came in 1974 with « The life of an old DJ » released on Tic Toc, probably when Fred hung up deejaying. 

Fred’s debut. Feb. 2, 1954

Fred Crawford "Hey little waitress"Hey little waitress

KERB radio station in Kermit, TX

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Life of an old DJ”

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Not included in the podcasts (altho’ fully downloadable) upon request)  are the following Starday tunes: Time will take you off my mind  (St. 124), “Empty feeling in my heart” (124)[also done six months before on the elusive Promotional label OP-163,] “I’ve learned something from you” (St 272),”You’re not the same sweet girl” (# 314) Then A- side of ‘D’ label #1158 “Im all alone”, easily available elsewhere this site.   As other tracks on AOK being less interesting. Being so much a country boy, Fred Crawford has not been reissued until now (except for the odd tune on compilations), which is a shame, as his music, specially that cut for Starday, is of very high standard.

Fred was born F. Benjamin Crawford on January 24, 1928, and died on January 13, 1998. He’s buried in the veteran’s corner (because of his activities during WWII) in the Colorado City cemetery out of Mitchell County, Texas.

Largely inspired by the posts of two blogs, Lone Star Stomp and Westex, both from Texas and done in the 2007/2010 period (same Summer period).

My most sincere thanks go to Armadillo Killer for sending many a side. Without his help, the article couldn’t be done – at least this way.

(Fred Crawford: a personal appreciation (bopping’s editor)

You Gotta Wait” (# 170) is just an outstanding uptempo hillbilly call to action, while the flipside « I just need some lovin’ » (written by labelmate Jimmy Walton) is just equally good.

You gotta wait”

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I just need some lovin'”

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Fred Crawford "Can't live with 'em"Fred Crawford "What's on your mind"Fred Crawford "You gotta wait"

Fred Crawford "I just need some lovin'"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can’t live with ’em” (St 199)

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What’s on your mind”(St 199

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But I feel that Fred’s crowning achievement is “Can’t Live With ‘Em” (# 199) : never has a white boy had such a bad case of the blues. Note that the songwriter is Mineoloa ‘local guy’ Jack Rhodes. Classy backing : a bluesy lead-guitar, a rinky-dink piano, a strong bass.

Billboard July 2, 1954

Other notable records from this era include : the very solid and macho inspired « Never gonna get married again » (# 156), the great Fred Crawford "Never gonna get married again"Fred Crawford "First on your list"uptempo « First on your list » (# 145 : here’s a wild steel guitar over a Hank Williams‘ typical uttering), also cut by Jack Tucker (released on « X » 0193) – no one can say for sure who came first, and the composer of this small classic, Tom Lancaster, doesn’t give any clue.

Never gonna get married again“(St 156)

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First on your list”(St 145)

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Eddie Noack‘s written « Me and my new baby » (# 218), and « Lucky in cards » (# 272) are other winners. And there’s no filler or weak track : every B-side is of high standard too, as the fast « Each passing day » (# 156), « Just another broken heart » (# 218) and the great ‘Starday swan song‘, his last on the label : « You’re not the same sweet girl » (# 314)

Billboard December 10, 1956

Eddie Noack: “Me and my new baby“(demo)

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Fred Crawford: “Me and my new baby”
(St 218)

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Lucky in cards”(St 272)

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Each passing day”(St 156)

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“Just another broken heart”(St 218)

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downloadFred Crawford "Lucky in cards"Fred Crawford "Each passing day"

There was also at least one waxing for the D label : fine 1960 honky tonkers (# 1058) « I’m all alone » and « Charlies gone ». After that Fred was strictly local, recording for Tommy Allsup/Max Gorman’s Westex/AOK stable, Spiral (which was housed in the former AOK studios), Tic-Toc, Lobo, and a label or two more. Among those efforts are a couple of records supporting his beloved Monahans High School football team and an odd little tribute to coin collecting [untraced].

Charlies gone”

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Fred was a songwriter for others too : I found once a song he gave to Smilin’ Jerry Jericho in 1954, the fine uptempo «I Can’t Give You Anything But Me » (Starday 133). Surely there may have been other Fred compos for others. If a visitor finds one, please do advise me of the find with the « contact me » button!

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The Mississipi legend LUKE McDANIEL (1952-56)

Born 3 February 1927, Ellisville, Mississippi. Died 27 June 1992, Mobile, Alabama.

luke pictureLuke McDaniel, like many a good singer was born in the good ole southern state of Mississippi, in Ellisville on February 3, 1927. He started in music as a mandolin player, and was influenced by hillbilly singers like The Bailes Brothers. He formed his own band and turned professional in 1945. He opened for Hank Williams in New Orleans in the late 40’s and appears to have become hooked on the lonesome sound of Hank. In 1952 he recorded “Whoa, Boy” for Trumpet Records (# 184) in Jackson, Mississippi. It’s a hillbilly boogie belter (call-and-response format) : strong steel guitar and sawing fiddle over an insistant fast rhythm. The flip side « No more » is a good uptempo hillbilly weeper, nicely done. He also cut as a tribute single, “A Tribute To Hank Williams, My Buddy“, a forgettable morbid slow weeper. The Trumpet records were all high quality hillbilly, but as with many at the time, showed him at this stage as little more than a Hank Williams clone.

trumpet 184 luke 78 whoa, boy!
trumpet 184 no more

Whoa, boy!

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No more

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In 1953 he was introduced to King Records by fellow artist Jack Cardwell (The Death of Hank Williams/ Dear Joan). He joined King but failed to register any hits despite half a dozen fine singles. He cut them either in radio station KWAB in Mobile, AL ; either at KWKH in Shreveport, La.; either in Cincinnati King studio.

« The automobile song » (King 1336), a fast hillbilly bopper, is done in gaiety, “Money Bag Woman” (King 1380) was particularly strong, fusing his hillbilly with a rhumba beat.

bb 10:4:54 luke king 1336

Billboard April 10, 1954

King 1338b 45 the automobile ong

The automobile song

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« I can’t go » (King 1276) is also a strong, although ordinary bopper. The mid-paced « One more heart » (King 1426) is less interesting as the slowie forgettable « Let me be a souvenir » (# 1356) and « Honey, won’t you please come home ». « Crying my heart out for you » (# 1356) renews with the « Money bag woman » rhumba beat with a welcome mandolin (maybe played by himself?). « Drive on » (# 1287) is a strong although ‘quiet’ bopper in the Hank Williams vein.

I can’t go

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It has been reported in a music paper circa 1954 that Luke was « spinning country records » at WLAU in Laurel, MS.

 

King 1276A luke mcdaniel - I can't goking 1356 luke - crying my heart out for youKing 1247b 78DJ - drive on

 

Crying my heart out for you

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Drive on

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When the King contract expired, he went back to New Orleans where he recorded for the Meladee label in 1955/56 under the alias Jeff Daniels at the legendary Cosimo’s Studio with the pick of the city’s black musicians. Only one single was released, the great frantic “Daddy-O-Rock” coupled with the quieter “Hey Woman” (# 117)

Daddy-o-rock

downloadmeladee 117 daddymeladee 117 woman

Hey woman

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In 54 he joined the Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport and became a part of the touring Hayride show. It was no doubt here that he saw Elvis Presley and started to move towards a more rocking sound. Around this time, McDaniel wrote “Midnight Shift” [a song about prostitution] under the pseudonym of Earl Lee, which Buddy Holly would later record on Decca.

Buddy HollyMidnight shift

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In 1956 Elvis and Carl Perkins urged McDaniels to submit a demo to Sam Phillips. Sam was impressed and signed McDaniel to a contract with Sun Records. It’s unsure whether he cut two sessions or just one at Sun (either September 56 or/and January 57). Nothing was issued though, as Sam and Luke had a financial disagreement. The unissued Sun sides have now seen the light of day thanks to reissue labels like Charly Records (Ferrero/Barbat 600 serie reissues). “Uh Babe” (Sun 620) is seminal-Sun rockabilly with Jimmy Van Eaton on fine form behind the skinned boxes. “High high high” is more a good uptempo rocker and sounds like a cross between Hayden Thompson and Gene Simmons.

620A huh babe620B high high high

Uh babe

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High high high

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Later McDaniel went to pure rock’n’roll on Venus, Astro, Big Howdy or Big B, but never achieved the big time.

Some songs he published : “Out of a Honky Tonk” and “Six Pallbearers” – co-written with Bob Gallion; “Blue Mississippi” and “You’re Still On My Mind”; and finally, “Mister Clock”, co-written with Jimmie Rogers. Another song credited to “Earl Lee” – “Seven or Eleven”, co-written with Jimmie Rogers and someone named Ainsworth, perhaps Arlene Ainsworth.

Biography taken on « Youzeek.com » and « hillbilly-music.com ». Additions from bopping’s editor. 

The Harmonica Boogie Woogie Man: AUBREY GASS (1939-1965)

Nothing is known about this important, although quite obscure artist of the 1940’s and ’50’s. Even not any statistic of birth or death, although he was certainly livng in the Dallas, TX area, and was born there during the ’20s. Nothing more is known about his childhood and beginnings in music, so we are forced to deal only with the records he appeared on.

From 1939 until 1952 he was closely associated with another Texan, AL DEXTER and worked with him either as washboard player (in the ’30s), sometimes harmonicist, and in some cases held the vocal duties into the Dexter’s band, « The Troopers », not forgetting he was also songwriter : he was co-writer (with Tex Ritter) of the all-time Hank Williams‘ classic, « Dear John ». But more about that later.

Al Dexter

In 1939, he was a member of the Al Dexter’s Troopers, as said before, and offered the group a good selling disc : « Wine, women and song » – recorded in December 1939 and issued on Vocalion 5572, it was covered by Texas Jim Lewis in September 1940 (Decca 05875), and by the Prairie Ramblers (Decca 05878) – the song must’ve looked to Decca’s executives a lucrative seller). When re-recorded by Dexter on Columbia 37062 in April 1945, he was a second time covered (a reissue) by Jim Lewis (Decca 46021). It attracted two more versions in 1946 by Frankie Marvin (San Antonio 107) and Dick James (Coast 234).

Gass gave Al Dexter (or co-wrote with him) two more songs in 1941/42 : « The Money You Spent Was Mine » (Okeh 6206) and « Honky Tonk Chinese Dime »(OKeh 6604). He played the harmonica on « Diddy, Wah, Diddy With A Blah !Blah ! » (Vocalion 6255) – which Dexter re-recorded later on King as « Diddy Wah Boogie » (# 885). Gass also held the vocal duty for « Sunshine » (Vocalion 04988, reissued in 1946 on Columbia 20240), both coming out of a long 8-track June 13th 1939 session.

Al Dexter, “Diddy, Wah, Diddy With A Blah! Blah!

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Aubrey Gass, vocalSunshine

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Al Dexter "Diddy wah diddy with a blah! blah!"Aubrey Gass "Sunshine"

As far at it concerns records, Aubrey Gass disappeared from the music scene between 1941 and 1946. Was he drafted in U.S. Army during W.W. II such a long time is improbable. Anyway, his first record under his real name was issued mid to late 1946 in Houston by Gold Star (# 1318) and coupled a then-famous for veterans couplet, « Kilroy’s Been Here » and «  Delivery Man Blues ». Backed by the Easterners (guitar, bass, fiddle, steel and piano), Gass on alert vocal and harmonica delivers a joyful A-side, although the bluesy B-side is equally at home. Indeed both sides were written by Gass, who saw the following year a reissue of his Gold Star disc on the new DeLuxe (#6001) label, a proof of the popularity of the record.

Kilroy’s Been Here

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Delivery Man Blues

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Aubrey Gass "Delivery Man Blues"Aubrey Gass "Kilroy's Been Here"Kilroy’s been here  lyrics

Paul Page

It must also be noted that a song « Kilroy Was Here » was recorded and released by Paul Page on Enterprise; reviewed by Billboard on August 31, 1946, no one can say who came first for sure.

Tex Ritter

« Dear John » […] was his biggest song ; in fact, it was the only hit he ever wrote. The first version was by Jim Boyd, younger brother of Dallas-based western swing artist Bill Boyd. Gass apparently knew Jim Boyd, offered him « Dear John », and Boyd recorded it on March 11, 1949. Soon after, Tex Ritter got his finger in the pie. Ritter probably promised to get the song cut by a big name, like himself, or to get Gass a contract with his label, Capitol, if he could get a piece of the song. The fact that Gass recorded « Dear John » for Capitol (# 40239, or # 1427) some five months after Boyd suggests that Ritter lived up to his half of their convenant. Hank Williams later picked (early 1951) up the song, this time co-written « Ritter-Gass ». Note : Jim Boyd’s version is already written by Gass and Ritter…

Jim Boyd, “Dear John” (original version)

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The session for Capitol took place in Dallas on August 9th, 1949 (Billboard announced both the contact signing and the recording session on Sept. 17) and supplied four more Gass-written songs. The backing of Wesley Tuttle and Group (specially come to Dallas) was made of Gass himself (vocal/harmonica), probably Tuttle (rhythm-guitar), a steel, a bass player and a drummer. First came the already discussed « Dear John » : Gass is full of energy on harmonica, has a husky voice, as on the fast « Look Me Up » and (by far the most hard-rocking tune of the lot) « K.C. Boogie ». The last song, « Gee But I’m Lonely Tonight », is a slowie and Gass doesn’t seems at ease here.

Billboard Nov. 12, 1949

Dear John

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Gee But I’m Lonely Tonight

copyright June 15,1950

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Look Me Up

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K. C. Boogie

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Aubrey Gass "Dear John"Aubrey Gass "Gee But I'm Lonely Tonight"Aubrey Gass "Look Me Up"Aubrey Gass "K. C. Boogie"

« Dear John » had numerous versions, among them an R&B rendition by Dinah Washington, which climbed at n°3 in the charts. It also had a follow-up in 1953 as « A Dear John Letter », first by Jean Shepard (Capitol 2502).

Next recording session Aubrey Gass collaborated for was done on May 19, 1950 by Al Dexter and his Troopers again. Gass was present, and played some harmonica on several tracks, but still being contracted to Capitol, could not sing at all. He plays (distinct style easily recognizable) on « Blow That Lonesome Whistle, Casey » (King 875)[very near in essence to “K. C. Boogie“], « Walking With The Blues » (which he co-wrote) (King 884), then both sides of King 913 : « Diddy Wah Boogie » and « You’ve Been Cheatin’ On Me ».

Al Dexter & His Troopers, “Blow That Lonesome Whistle, Casey”

downloadAl Dexter "Blow That Lonesome Whistle, Casey"Al Dexter "Walking With The Blues"Al Dexter "Diddy Wah Boogie"
Walking With The Blues

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Diddy Wah Boogie

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You’ve Been Cheatin’ On Me

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At unknown dates he cut several demos at Sellers Studio in Dallas, between 1950 and late 1951. Three of them found their way on the British/Nederland Boppin’ Hillbilly compilation n° 2810. Due to legal rights, we are not allowed to offer these great sides. They are : « Columbus Stockade Blues », « Here Today And Gone Tomorrow » and « Walkin’ Out Of Town ».Aubrey Gass "Fisherman Boogie"Aubrey Gass "Counting My Teardrops"Al Dexter, vocal by Al Dexter and Aubrey Gass "Counting M Teardrops"Al Dexter, vocal by Aubrey Gass "Fisherman's Boogie"

But « Counting My Teardrops » and « Fisherman Boogie », cut late 1951 or early 1952, were issued under Gass’ own name by Sellers as acetates, and released just as they were under Al Dexter’s name (« Vocal by Aubrey Gass ») on Decca, respectively 28345 and 28137 during the first half of 1952. Both tracks were probably recorded (given date by Michel Ruppli’s book « The Decca label » as Feb. 7, 1952) with the Al Dexter band : trumpet, rhythm-guitar, piano (particularly rolling in « Fisherman’s boogie»), steel, bass and drums and no harmonica at all. This 14 tunes session has no less than 8 unissued tracks, and could well reveal some surprises.

Aubrey Gass Vocal“, “Fisherman’s Boogie

Billboard August 23, 1952

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Aubrey Gass & Al Dexter,Counting My Teardrops

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A recent discovery on eBay has surfaced an unissued Audiodisc dated (as handwritten on label) May 23,1956. « Garbage Man » by Gass is a strange novelty : only vocal, harmonica and rhythm guitar. The acetate was gone on December 19, 2017 for $ 118,00.

Garbage Man“(acetate)

downloadAubrey Gass acetate "Garbage Man"

In 1962 (June) Aubrey Gass gave Tom O’Neal « Two Many Tickets » (released first on Cheatham 104, then reissued on Starday 607), a country rocker ; it’s probably Gass who played the harmonica in this song, as well as on the flipside « Sleeper Cab Blues ».

Tom O’NealToo Many Tickets

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Tom O’Neal,Sleeper Cab Blues

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Tom O'Neal "Too Many Tickets"

We now jump to one of the most famous Aubrey A. Gass records (backed by the Hel-Cats), this is on the Irving, TX Helton label released in 1965. « Corn fed Gal » is present in two recent compilations : a rocker with swooping piano (# 671-103), backed with a new version of « Kilroy’s Been Here ».(a good guitar ; piano is replaced by a discreet steel). Same label had Grady Owen (ex-Gene Vincent‘s Blue Caps bass player in 1958) (# 102) with « Vietnam Blues ».

Further research has unearthed a demo of « Corn Fed Gal », cut for the « Boyd Recording Service » in Dallas. The strange thing is that this version runs at 2 mn 05, while the Helton version has a duration of 2 mn 22. So then, are they the same ? Could it be that the lucky owner of the Boyd record please stand up and say the truth about this point. I am inclined personnally towards two different versions. This demo was sold on eBay in 2010 for $ 136,00.

Aubrey Gass "Corn Fed Gal" (Boyd Recording Serrvice)Aubrey Gass "Kilroy's Been Here"Aubrey Gass "Corn Fed Gal"

 

 

Corn Fed Gal“(Helton version)

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“Kilroy’s Been Here

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Last record is on the Swansee label # 1908 (mid-’60s) by Mr. G. « Pork-N-Beans » and « Sittin’n’Thinkin’ » are unheard, both written « Aubrey A. Gass », so cannot comment. Remember (see above) his actual name was Aubrey Andrew Gass.

Sources : my sincere thanks to UncleGil for Bronco Buster, the King Project, the Starday project and BACM music ; many (if not all) label scans do come from 78rpm-worlds ; thanks to ole’ Ronald Keppner for Sellers acetates ; Dave Sichak of hillbilly-music.com for Aubrey Gass only known picture ; Gripsweat site for 1956 acetate ; Colin Escott, « Hank Williams, The Biography » for the « Dear John » story. Billboard books for notifications of releases (Thanks Imperial!).

Your comment is welcome: use the “Submit a comment” button below. Thanks!

Wheeling, W. Va. hillbilly: the DUSTY OWENS story (1954-57)

Dusty Owens was born on September 2, 1930 in Fairdealing, Missouri as Robert James Kucharski. Shortly after his birth, his family moved to Flint, Michigan where he spent most of his childhood. When he was 6 years old, Robert took violin lessons in school but he later moved to accordion which seemed to be more to his liking. In 1947, while in High school, he joined a local western band called the O.K. Boys to play the accordion. Later that year Robert became their front man and changed the band’s name to Dusty Owens and his Rodeo Boys.

In 1947 Owens entered Flint Technical High School but he soon dropped out and moved to Saginaw, Michigan, to find a job as a professional musician. It was in St. Joseph, Missouri, while working for radio station KFEQ that he received his first official pay as a musician. When Glen Harris of Shenandoah, Iowa radio station KMA asked Dusty to come work for him, he moved to Iowa. At KMA he got acquainted with the famous Blackwood Brothers Quartet and with Ike Everly, the father of Everly Brothers Don and Phil. Ike was largely responsible for Dusty’s later career: he stimulated Dusty to concentrate on a singing rather than on playing the accordion and he helped him to get his own weekly 15-minute radio show at KMA. Ike treated Dusty as his pupil and took him to all kinds of events that might be helpful for Dusty’s singing career.

In 1949 Dusty Owens recorded several radio transcriptions for “Mother’s Best Flour” as well as for “Lassie Feeds” but when he got married later that year, he returned to Flint to work as an accordion teacher at a local school of music. In 1951, he and his former band the Rodeo Boys regrouped and briefly worked for radio station WHO, Des Moines. Apart from doing their regular weekday radio shows, the Rodeo Boys also were part of the “Iowa Barn Dance Frolic” that was broadcasted on Saturday nights.

In 1953, Dusty and his band joined the Wheeling Jamboree from Wheeling, West-Virginia, which was one of the most famous barn dances at the time. That same year Owens signed a songwriters contract with Acuff-Rose and on October 1, 1953 he signed a recording contract with Columbia Records. It was a standard contract for one year against a royalty rate of 2% of 90% and two one-year options.

On October 28, 1953 Dusty Owens did his first recording session for Columbia, with Hank Williams’ Drifting Cowboys and Chet Atkins providing the back-up. During the session at the Castle studio in Nashville’s Tulane hotel, he recorded four songs that were all self penned. Columbia released “Hello, Operator” and “The Life You Want To Live” (Columbia 21202) in January, 1954 and in May they released “Just Call On Me” and Somewhere She’s Waiting” (Columbia 21260).

The second recording session for Columbia was done on June 3, 1954, and again, Columbia released all four songs.

Don Law decided to exercise the first option in Owens’ contract and on June 21, 1955, he did his third recording session for the label. Only two songs of this session were eventually issued and Columbia didn’t exercise the second option.

In 1956 Owens recorded six songs for his own Admiral label, including his most famous song “Once More” that was later cut by many others including George Jones, Melba Montgomery, the Osborne Brothers, Roy Acuff and Dolly Parton. During the 1960’s he recorded for Wynwood, but the quality of those recordings was inferior to his previous output.

Dusty Owens, a music appreciation (by bopping’s editor)

The Columbia sides (1954-1955) are generally of high standard. Although Owens is more at ease with medium paced tear-jerkers, he offers also some very good fast boppers. Let’s investigate his records side by side.

« Hello, operator » (# 21202) is a fast uptempo with fine fiddle and bass. A steel solo and a brisk vocal. Its flipside «The life you want to live » is a sincere medium paced shuffler.

Billboard April 30, 1954


“Hello, operator”

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“The life you want to live”

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Billboard June 26, 1954

More of the previous one with the follow-up « Just call on me » # 21260) : a warm voice over a fine fiddle. Its flipside « Somewhere she’s waiting » is an uptempo which shines the steel of Don Helms in.

“Just call on me”

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Somewhere she’s waiting

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A good song is « They didn’t know the difference (but I did) » (# 21310), an uptempo with fast fiddle and bass. « A love that once was mine » is a weeper that can be remoted.

Billboard Oct. 23, 1954

They didn’t know the difference (but I did)

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The last 4 Columbia sides are all medium paced weepers, sometimes very sincere, but excitement is gone, and no song really comes to light.

The Admiral sides are in comparison far superior than the Columbias.

A very great early 1956 fast duet first « It’s goodbye and so long » (# 1000) with Donna Darlene (1938-2017), paired with the all-time hit « Once more » : an energetic blend of duet vocal, fiddle and steel.

It’s goodbye and so long

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Once more

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« Cure that shyness » (# 1002) has Don Owens solo and is a fast bopper. « A place for homeless hearts » is a medium paced tune with great ‘hillbilly’ voice. « Hey honey » ( 1004) is a good version of the Wiley Barkdull song (Hickory 1074) and dates from 1957. The flip « Our love affair » is a fast shuffler with strong bass.

Cure that shyness

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A place for homeless hearts

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Wiley Barkdull, “Hey honey”

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Dusty Owens, “Hey honey”

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I am putting aside Dusty Owens last sides (Admiral 1008) once his label was relocated in Florida : both songs are really poppish and outside the scope of this blog.

I added the very fine Rockabilly/bopper « You’re not doin’ me right » (Admiral 1003) by Donna Darlene, certainly backed by Dusty Owens’ Rodeos.

You’re not doin’ me right

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And mention must be made of the Abbie Neal Rockabilly platters on the label: “Newton’s law” (# 1001), “If again” (# 1006) and “Hillbilly beat” (# 15000). They may come in later fortnight’s favorites.

Biography and Columbia songs taken from W. Agenant « Columbia 20000 serie » blog ; Admiral songs from various sources, mainly YouTube. Labels from 45-cat or 78rpm-world. Dusty Owens pictures from Hillbilly-Music site.

Hillbilly in Houston: R. D. HENDON & his Western Jamboree Cowboys (1951-56)

R. D. Hendon & his Western Jamboree Cowboys were one of the most popular western bands in South East Texas in the first half of the 1950s. Their renown never really extended much beyond the Houston area, but that sort of regional fame was the norm in an era when the country music scene was far les centralized and national stardom was a far more rare thing han it became in later decades. The group served as training ground for such performers as the great songwriter and singer Eddie Noack and the guitarist-vocalist Charlie Harris – neither a household name then and now, but this is not a reflection of their abilities or relative importance – and also included a number of less known but no less talented performers, such as guitarist-vocalist Harold Sharp, fiddler Woody Carter and guitarist Hamp Stephens.

R. D. Hendon himself was rarely an active participant in the band – he had, by all reports, an almost singular lack of musical ability or talent – though he did in his later stages attempt to drum and sing with the group and recorded a recitation under the name the Western Rambler. Nor were the Western Jamboree Cowboys the smoothest and slickest of Houston’s numerous top-notch western dance bands. They were more a classic honky-tonk band than a western swing band like Dickie McBride or Benny Leaders’ groups ad excelled the closer they stuck to that classic, earthier sound. The Cowboys’ performing days came to an abrupt halt in September of 1956 when Hendon, long a troubled man, took his own life, but in the preceding half decade they laid down a number of fine recordings – including a couple of undisputed classics.

Rigsby Durwood Hendon was born around 1914 in Marquez, Texas, and grew up in the Houston area. He served in the Navy and worked as an oilfield roughneck before entering the night club business. The growing popularity of the house band, the South Texas Cowboys, at his Sprinx Club led Hendon to purchase a larger club, the Old Main Street Dance Hall, better known, as Andrew Brown has pointed out, by its street address, 105½ Main. « Hendon gave the club « a western theme » Brown adds, « and rechristened it the Western Jamboree Night Club. The band’s name change followed suit and, by 1950, the club was drawing huge crowds six nights a week. » The band began broadcasting on Houston’s KLEE, where Hendon also nabbed a slot as a disc jockey, and began recording around the start of 1951.

The band’s first recordings were for Sol Kahal’s local Freedom label (# 5033), which had been in operation since 1948 and began a hillbilly series a year or so later. »Those tears in your eyes » b/w « No shoes boogie » was actually issued under bandmember Charlie Harris‘ name, with Hendon and the band receiving secondary credit. The disc is a classic, « No Shoes Boogie » being, Brown writes, »an excellent example of the hard-rocking, shuffle-beat swing that was common in Texas before rock and roll. » In addition to Harris, who wrote and sang both songs and supplied incisive, hot lead guitar, the band at this time included Johnny Cooper, guitar; Theron Poteet, piano ; Tiny Smith, bass ; and Don Brewer, drums. Regular steel man Joe Brewer was replaced on this session by former Texas Playboy, the legendary and still active Herb Remington, who played one of his most exciting solos here.

No shoes boogieCharlie Harris "Those tears in your eyes"Charlie Harris "No shoes boogie"

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“Those tears in your eyes”

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Soon after, Hendon & the Cowboys joined a number of other Houston acts – including Jerry Jericho and Hank Locklin – in the stable of Bill McCall, the canny and ruthless West Coast label owner whose long-term relationship with the legendary Houston distributor and record man Pappy Daily yeilded a number of excellent recordings on McCall’s Four Star, Gilt-Edge and associated custom and radio-play labels. From the beginning, the Cowboys’ recordings were generally issued in Four Star’s quasi-custom « X » series, but several issues also wound up being issued on the label’s main series and this saw wider distribution.

The Four Star recordings were inaugurated by another coupling that featured Charlie Harris, who was soon to leave the group. « Oh ! Mr. President » (4* X-20) was a rush-job in the spring of 1951, a rare, overtly political song dealing with the firing of General MacArthur by President Truman. This was followed by an excellent coupling that featured long-time bandmember Johnny Cooper, « The Wandering Blues » b/w « Marking time » (4* X-24).

Oh! Mr. PresidentR. D. Hendon (Charlie Harris) "Oh! Mr. President"

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The wandering blues”

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Eddie Noack

Cooper was soon replaced by Eddie Noack, already a veteran of the Houston recording scene and by mid-1951 the Western Jamboree Cowboys had settled into a classic lineup. Vocals were divided among Noack, Cecil « Gig » Sparks and Harold Sharp, with the two former supplying rhythm guitar and Sharp playing a sturdy lead. Don Brewer played steel, Tiny Smith played bass (Sparks and Smith had recently joined the band from Leon Payne’s group). A slew of strong recordings followed, including Noack’s classic debut, « I can’t run away » (4* 1590) , and two versions of the pretty « This moon won’t last forever ». The first version featured Harold Sharp (4* X-33) and a guest appearance of one of the song’s writers, trumpeter-bandleader Gabe Tucker, while a remake (4* 1590) marked the brief return of the peerless balladeer Charlie Harris and boasted a fiddle solo by former Floyd Tillman band mainstay Woody Carter, who joined the band for a few months during 1951-52 and was featured on the fiddle tune « Nervous Breakdown ».

R. D. Hendon (Harold Sharp) "This moon won't last forever"R. D. Hendon (Eddie & Gig) "I cant run away"
I can’t run away

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This moon won’t last forever“(vocal Charlie Harris)

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In late 1952 and early 1953, Hendon briefly recorded for the local Shamrock label, though he later returned to Four Star and several of the Shamrock recordings wound up being reissued on Four Star, as well, including the fantastic « Blues Boogie » (Shamrock X-13, 4* 1644) from fall 1952, which featured the twin electric
R. D. Hendon "Blues boogie"guitars of Harold Sharp and Hamp Stephens (who played the deep, boogie bass runs under Sharp’s melody lead) and the band’s new steel guitarist Chet Skyeagle. The fine guitarist Stephens had joined the band after stints with Hank Locklin and Bill Freeman’s Texas Plainsmen, both of whom recorded for Four Star. Spark’s maudlin tale of guilt « Hit and run driver » was issued only on Shamrock, while Jimmy Tyler’s fine «I Ain’t got a lick of sense » was recorded by Shamrock but issued by McCall (4* 1644) . A final Four Star release featured an unidentified vocalist (possibly Chuck Davis) on one of the more western swing orientated songs the Cowboys cut «You crazy mixed up kid » and « Talking to myself » (4* X-86). The last recordings for McCall were a group of covers of current hits issued on EP’s on the Blue Ribbon label. The sessions featured not only Harold Sharp, but also guest vocalists, fellow Four Star artists Jerry Jericho and Rocky Bill Ford. Among the covers were « Hey Joe » (Carl Smith), « For now and always » (Hank Snow), « Free home demonstration » (Eddy Arnold) and « I won’t be home no more » (Hank Williams).

Blues boogie

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Ain’t got a lick of sense

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R. D. Hendon "You crazy mixed up kid"You crazy mixed up kid

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R. D. Hendon "Ain't got a lick of sense"Music making mama from Memphis”(vocal Eddie Noack)R. D. Hendon (vocal by Eddie) "Music making mama from Memphis"R. D. Hendon "Trademark"

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Hey Joe” [vocal Jerry Jericho)

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I won’t be home no more” (vocal Rocky Bill Ford)

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R. D. Hendon (vocal by Eddie) "I'd still want you"I’d still want you” (vocal Eddie Noack)

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Like many artists who had come to McCall via Pappy Daily, Hendon signed to Daily’s Starday label as soon as he could free himself of any contractual obligations to McCall – not easy feat in itself. From late 1954 to mid-1956, the Western Jamboree Cowboys cut four singles for Starday. Arguably not as strong across the board as the band’s previous recordings, there were still some fine moments, including Bill Taylor’s « Don’t push me. » (Starday 228) (Taylor would record for Sun Records « Split personality », with the Snearly Ranch Boys as well as working a long stint with Jimmy Heap‘s Melody Masters).

R. D. Hendon (vocal by Bill Taylor) "Don't push me (Let me fall)"

“Don’t push me”(vocal Bill Taylor)

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Starday sides featured old hands like Harold Sharp and Gig Sparks, but later sides feature new bandmembers Taylor and Jack Rodgers. Hendon had a small hit in 1956 with « Lonely nights » (Starday 248) and another good tune was « Return my broken heart » (# 167).

“Bill Taylor & Smokey Jo “Split personality”R. D. Hendon "Loney nights"Bill Taylor & Smokey Jo "Split personality"

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“Lonely nights”

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R. D. Hendon (vocal by Harold Sharp) "Return my broken heart"Return my broken heart

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Hendon’s suicide came not long after the final Starday release and occurred at a time of great musical upheaval. Rock and roll had arrived with a vengeance and it would have been interesting to see if Hendon would have managed to ride the storm of changing tastes – at the same time, the dancehall scene was being decimated by television and other factors. At any rate, Hendon was certainly game to try something new – his second Starday release found him trying his hand at singing rockabilly on the odd, uneven « Big Black Cat »(Starday 194) – although it’s obvious that Hendon was not a talented vocalist, as on the unissued-at-the-time « My old guitar » (during the song he even loses several times the tempo!).

Big black cat

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R. D. Hendon "Big black cat"
My old guitar

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Regardless of what might have been happened had Hendon lived beyond 1956, the half-dozen years in which the Western Jamboree Cowboys thrived remain a testament enough to Hendon and his talented crew.

Sources : the main biography went from Kevin Coffey for the Cattle CD 329 (2006), and some additions from Andrew Brown. As usual, a solid help was given by the indefatigable 78rpm-owner Ronald Keppner out of Frankfurt, Germany, thanks to him. Four Star X-20 was given by Steve Hathaway. Then my own researches and archives.