Late February 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks ! It’s the second fortnight of February 2019, and there are already in this blog 5 issues since January 1st, that of two bopping fortnight’s favorites selections, and two throroughly researched hillbilly profiles, that first of the North Carolina Church Brothers and second of the harmonica extraordinaire Lonnie Glosson. Now we embark for the late February bopping selection. Latch on, folks !

Lacy Kirk

A very fast 1961 Hillbilly rocker bt LACY KIRK, « This Is Saturday Night » – guitar played on the bass chords, too short steel-guitar and fiddle solos. Singer in a good voice. This record was released on Ohio Karl 3022, a label of Clay Eager bopping is now actively researching on (see « I’m Looking For » section) . The man had many good records to his credit, and maybe you can help to share your knowledge of him with me and all the readers of the blog. « This Is Saturday Night » will cost you $ 270 if you can locate a copy in good shape.

Carson Willis

CARSON WILLIS is rightly interesting for more than one reason. He hailed from South Carolina it seems, and released the fast Hillbilly rocker « Sal’s House # 1 and # 2 as talking songs on Dixie (another of this name) # 121 (duet with Goldie Norris) complete with animals’ yells. Actually it was a reworking of « Going Down To Sal’s House » issued on the Starday custom Dixie # 903 in September 1959 under the name BILL WILLIS.

The flipside « Poor Man » is similar in style.

Bill /Harmon R. Willis

And Willis (if he’s really the same man) was to publish in 1958 as « HARMON R. WILLIS & Family », again on Dixie-NC [=North Carolina, one can assume] 123, « Crossing Over Jordan », a very good sacred Hillbilly. Finally Bill Willis also issued the fine double-sided « Boogie Woogie All Night »/ »Where Is My Baby », a classic Rockablly on Dixie 825 (value $ 300 to 400).

Another Rockailly bopper, « Wanted, Dead Or Alive » comes next on the G. B. 406 label by CURTIS WILSON : urgent vocal, and a good rhythm guitar. Other records of interest are : « Teenage Party Line » (Canary 6417) and « My Heart Is Made Of The Blues » (Cherry 1014 – the very same Scottsville Kentucky label which did bear Art Adams, Judy Capps or Johnny Hargett and Tommy Holmes – phew ! what a Rockabilly poster!). Alas, Wilson’s records didn’t live up to their promises, as they were teen rockers.

Carl Perkins

On to a star, which is unusual in bopping. CARL PERKINS in May 1955 cut the Hillbilly bopper (very near to Rockabilly) « Let The Juke Box Keep On Playing ». A very great Rockaballad, warm voice, guitar and bass – steel by Stan Kesler and fiddle by Bill Cantrell, both stalwart accompanists on more than one Hillbilly session at Sun or Meteor. This record is perfect !

Wayne Busbice

Frankie Short & Dee Gunter

Finally from Baltimore, MD the frantic voiced duet « Country Boy Trock And Roll » (mandolin, fiddle and banjo) by FRANKIE SHORT and DEE GUNTER on the Wango label (# 201), which bopping researches on. Short (with Green Valley Boys) had another interesting record, « No Longer Sweetheart Of Mine » during the early ’70s. Indeed the original to “Country Boy..” had been cut late 1956 by Don Reno & Red Smiley on King 5002: Short and Gunter do frankly copy this original.

And that’s it for this late February 2019 selection. My thanks go to CheeseBrewWax YouTube chain ; to 45-cat for several label scans, as « Ohio River Records » site ; Tom Lincoln’s book for the value of Rockabilly/Rock’n’roll records ; consulting also Michel Ruppli’s book « The Mercury Discography » was also helpful (Merle Lindsay record) ; finally my own archives.

early September 2011 fortnight favourites

event  fairlie tableHowdy, folks! Back from holydays on Italian Ligurian Riviera. Believe me, it’s hot over there, nice small towns beyond the sea but not bopping music at all, aaargh! A nice not-feeling-at-home anyhow, that’s the most important. Hope you all had good holydays too, and ready to embark for more work, more trouble – world do seem to go head-over-heels. Fortunately we have the music!

Let’s begin this favourites’ return with a strange item: a fair Hillbilly on a Boston, East Coast label. Al Hawkes had launched his Event label in Feb. ’56, recording first only Country, thus KEN FAIRLIE (# 4264) for “The Table’s Turned” – nice fiddle, and smooth vocal for a very short (1’42) tune. Later on, Hawkes would have on his stable Rockabillies/Rockers Curtis Johnson, Ricky Coyne, even young Dick Curless. Recently I posted the LLOYD McCOLLOUGH story, and repeat here one of his finest songs on the Nashville/Los Angeles EKKO label (which published in its short existence very important discs by the likes of Jess Willard, The Cochran Brothers or Johnny Tyler): “Until I Love Again” (# 1023). Entire output of McCollough can be found on a U.K. Stompertime CD. Next record he had was Rockabilly on the Nashville Republic label. This Ekko release is from ’55.

ekko 1023 lloyd-mc-culloughFrom Raymondville, Texas comes FLETCHER HANNA, with Joe “Red” Hainer and the Ozark Playboys, for the nice shuffling “Hepcat Boogie” – topical lyrics, references to “Heartbreak Hotel” and “Blue Suede Shoes“, and a very short slap bass solo – on the Valley 101 label (not to be confused with the Tennessee label of the same name – remember Reece Shipley or Darrell Glenn). Very good atmospheric (steel guitar) record. Must be from ’56. valley  Hanna Hepcat

From California on the Happy Hearts label (a very rich and interesting one), JIMMY HAYES with the Coney Ridge Ramblers for “Tom Cat Boogie” (# 141)  from as late as 1961. Another shuffler with a good guitar player, who makes some nice licks.    happy-hearts  hayes tom

Now on the legendary Dixie label. BILL WILLIS had Starday custom releases, such as “Boogie Woogie All Night” or “Goin’ Down To Sal’s House” (Dixie 502) (respectively on Ace or Collector CDs). Here, he is vocal duetted (Goldie Norris?) on a rattlesnake-drummed “Where Is My Baby“. Nothing spectacular, just an ordinary ’57 Southern record.

dixie  willis where

Finally a real R&B blaster! YOUNG JESSIE in a New York session with Mickey Baker on guitar and Sam “The Man” Taylor on tenor saxophone – added by (unknown) baritone sax, bass and drummer, for the fantastic “Hit, Git And Split” for the Modern label. Why this was not a hit is a mystery: without doubt, the barrier of racism in ’56 and the savagery of the record, which must have been banned by radio stations, even in the Alan Freed’s territory. One of the real all-time R&B rockers classics!

young jessiemodern Jessie Hit Hope you enjoy the selections! Comments welcome. Bye

Next fortnight early October – I will be out of town by mid-September.