Early September 2021 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Fortnight early september 2021t

BOB PERRY on the Chicago label Bandera ( 1305) does provide us with a great, fast Country-rocker in 1960-61, « Weary Blues, Goodbye ». Fabulous rhythm guitar, assured vocal, and a out-of-this world steel-guitar solo. No drums audible, the rhythm guitar does give the pace. Perry was also on the Denver, Co label Bandbox (# 255) with the average « It’s All Over Now « . The « Goodbye » item change hands for $150-200, according to Tom Lincoln’s book. Barry K. John doesn’t even mention it.

Some call him « the « King of rockabilly «  (or the inventor,to say the least). CHARLIE FEATHERS had a rich career from 1955 until his death (1998). He began on Sun Records, before going for his greatest exposure on Meteor in 1956 and the classic double-sider « Get With It/ Tongue tied Jill » # 5032. He then switched to King, without any success (the place was full of young rockers), after that he came to small concerns : Kay, Memphis, Holiday Inn (a Sam Phillips’ label), Philwood, Pompadour and Vetco ; not to mention , after his rediscovery ;many albums iincluding on his own label, Feathers. Here he is with is second disc for Sun (the first was on the temporary Flip label). « Defrost Your Heart » has all the ingredients of Rockabilly : slapping bass (Bill Black), the Quinton Claunch (guitar) and Bill Cnntrell (fiddle) team, howms and growls by the singer. Sam Phillips never did allow Feathers to sing Rockabilly but ballads (November 1955).
The second side exceeds the limits of the site (1945-1965), a tour-de-force for Charlie, his lead player and the slapping bass of Marcus Van Story : « Where She’s At Tonight » (also publshed as « Rain ») (1969) is a dream come true for any Rockabilly lover.

.From a King to another ; this one of Honky Tonk, the greatest of ’em all : HANK WILLIAMS (1923-1953). He left behind him a lot of demos like this « Blue Love ». Great rhythm guitar and this unmistably voice. Next song is a another demo, which was later overdubbed by his band, the Drifting Cowboys. « Weary Blues From Waitn’ » is pure Honky Tonk heaven. It even has some yodel by Williams .

SLIM RHODES (born 1913) originally from Arkansas, cut records for Sam Phillips in 1950 which were issued by Gilt-Edge, a California concern. His “Hot Foot Rag » (# 5015) had a powerful lead guitar. In 1956 they cut 4 sides at Sun records aimed at Rockabilly circles, « Gonna Romp And Stomp » ( # 238) and “Do What I Do »/ »Take And Give » (256)

Next artist was out of Nahville. CLAY EAGER recorded for Republic. « Don’t Come Cryin’ On My Shoulder » ( # 7077) was a fair medium-paced bopper. . Later on, he went on his own label and Karl.

BOBBY ROBERTS was a two-faced artist. In 1955, he cut a fabulous Hank Williams styled Honky tonker, « I’m Gonna Comb You Outta Of My Hair » (November 1955) with his Ozark Drifters ( King 4837 (what a title!), The follow-up was « I’m Pullin’ Stakes And Leavin’ You » (# 4868), then was gone for Rockabilly in 1958 on Hut Records, a very small diskery,and in 1956 for Sky (MS) « Big Sandy »/She’s My Woman ». The son to Roberts did confirm me his Dad was on King then Sky and Hut.

CHUCK HARDING must have been a good seller, because Modern issued a good half-dozen records by him. « Talkin’ The Blues » is a fine bopper from 1947.

Sources: my own archives (Hank Williams, Bobby Roberts), Internet for Happy Wainwright. Many items do come from my own sound library.

From Florida or Georgia, HAPPY WAINWRIGHT went in 1961 with a good bopper (nice steel) on Carma 505, « Nothing But Love ».

Late November 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks! Here is the more recent selection of fortnight’s favorites. Hope you will find something of interest here.

>The Tennessee Drifers

The TENNESSEE DRIFERS were a small outfit, whose main instrument was a piano. The vocalist was either George Toon, either Billy Hardison, and they released three nice fast tracks on Dot : « Mean Ole Boogie » ( # 1098, from 1951), and « Boogie Woogie Baby»/ »Drive Those Blues Away » (1953 on Dot 1166). Great hillbilly bopping piano. At times, Tommy Moreland (remember the great « The Drifter » n Maid 1000, released in November 2018 fortnight’s favorites) was among the members.At a very later date (1961), George Toon and the Tennessee Drifters released a pop-country effort, “Those Fairy Tales” (Unamic 4501). The track is posted only for comparison with their better early ’50s bopping sides!

Rooster Swan

Internet is a a firm place to unearth some new music. Here’s a demo of « Honky Tonk Girl » by ROOSTER SWAN from 1957. A rhythm guitar then a lead for a short solo plus vocal of course. The song does last for less than a minute but is a pleasant bopper.

Keith Anderson & the Ohio Valley Boys

KEITH ANDERSON is famous for his ’60s sides on Cozy, like « Hot Guitars » (Cozy 12/13). Here he is with an earlier side, « Locked Up Again » with Ohio Valley Boys, on a New Martinsville, WVa. Ran-Dell label # 934. It’s a sort of rocking ballad – good steel and extrovert vocal (1961).

Elva Carver with Pat Kingery & the Kentuckians

Out of Scottsville, Ky, the Goldenrod label issued several Rockabilly classics (remember Harold Shutters). Here’s ELVA CARVER with Pat Kingery & the Kentuckians for « Two-Toned Love » from 1956. Good fiddle and electrifying mandolin over a nice female vocal.

The Western Cherokees

The Western Cherokees backed in recording sessions and on stage Lefty Frizzell from 1950 to 1952. They were led by Robert Lawrence « BLACKIE » CRAWFORD, guitar player. They had in their own right sides cut on Coral then Starday. Here is « Jump Jack Jump » on Coral 64138. Great and fast hillbilly bopper out of Texas. A further side is an equally good, lowdown shuffler, « Baby Buggy Blues » (Coral 64118).

Happy Wainwright

Then HAPPY WAINWRIGHT on a 1961 disc, « Nothing But Love » (Carma 505, out of Kenner, La.). It’s a belter – good steel throughout.

Sources: sometimes YouTube (Eva Carver, Keith Anderson, Rooster Swan); from Ohio River 45’s: Blackie Crawford : songs from HBR series; picture from Hillbilly.com. My own collection for Tennessee Drifters on Dot, “Boogie Beat Rag” comes from Karl-Heinz Focke – thanks to him.