Early December 2018 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks, welcome to new visitors. This is the early December 2018 fortnight’s favorites selection, and, as usual, it will be very various in styles from late 1947 to 1964.

Bennie Hess

BENNIE HESS was a Country singer born February 10, 1914 at Chriesman (Texas). He formed his first band The Rhythm Wranglers in 1940 and a show on the local radio KFYO Lubbock (Texas). First hit in 1945 for the Black And White Records.

Bennie spent at the Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport (Louisiana), the Big D Jamboree in Dallas (Texas) and the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville (Tennessee). Died November 22, 1984 in Houston (Texas) Here he is with a B-side of Jet 1920 («You Can’t Catch A Fish Where Is No Water»): You Are In My Heart To Stay» is a nice uptempo ballad, with a fine rhythm section (piano and steel solos) (circa 1955), without doubt recorded in Houston.
He had an abundant stack of records on Pearl, Major, Musicode, Space and Spade during the ’50s. Maybe one day bopping.org will search about him.

He got her up to an hundred and ten
But he met Number Four comin’ around the bend
He told his fireman it’s now too late
’Cause they saved this space for the Pearly Gates
He passed Number Four with a great big sigh
The set’n on a Switch to let him by
He boogied and he boogied on down the line
With a big relief and a day to live on
Whooo whooo hear that whistle
Ding dong hear that bell
He stated down on a mighty hill

Richard Prine

(Slim Watts vocal)

RICHARD PRINE was a band leader (and drummer) during the early ’50s in Houston. Here he has Slim Watts (several discs on 4*) as a front man for «Highball Boogie» on Ayo 111. It’s a train song : rollicking piano, whistle effects (steel?) and a very agile guitar player. The band has even a Western swing touch with a nice fiddle and a saxophone (Link Davis?).

Prine also used Deacon Anderson as singer/steel player. As to regards to Slim Watts, he had half a dozen issues on 4 * or “Tu-La-Lu” on Starday 286.

The following 4 records were issued on Dixie, being a very frequent label name. So various places (when given on labels) of the U.S.

GUY GARDNER & His Country Four

On Dixie 1068 (1961) by GUY GARDNER & his Country Four, here’s «High Society», an uptempo ballad : jumping vocal and instrumentation (piano and steel). Madison, TN label (sublabel to Starday).

ART BUCHANAN

On Dixie 1002, ART BUCHANAN and «Hi Yo Silver» from January 1963. Energetic vocal, call-and-response format. He had also «Queen From Bowling Green» on Dixie 823, and under the name of Art Ontario, he had cut «It Must Be Me/Last Goodbye» in 1959 on the PD Starday sublabel Dixie from Madison, TN (# 2019) (valued at $ 300-400). Finally his rarest from 1958: «Wiggle walkin’ boogie» on Illinois 725 ($ 700-800).

JESSIE FLOYD

Third artist in this short Dixie serie is JESSIE FLOYD in 1964, for «Hangover Blues»(# 1063). A fine vocal, and a demented piano. This record could have been cut as well in 1958.(valued at $ 350-450). Ashboro, N. Carolina label.

JAKE THOMAS

Finally JAKE THOMAS (« with Bluegrass Band ») is releasing «What’ll I Do, a really fine bluesy tune: an ideal voice, a bit husky at times, for this type of song.

A dobro is the main instrument, and a slap-bass is going well its way. A fiddle also present. Value 300-400. Thomas had also released « Meanest Blues » on Dixie 1112.

PEE WEE KING (Redd Stewart vocal)

Something really dfferent with the swinging, bluesy Redd Stewart vocal for «Juke Box Blues» of PEE WEE KING (RCA-Victor 20-2841) from December 1947. A bluesy uptempo, a fine guitar ; indeed King’s accordion fighting with the steel, and even a fiddle solo. A great disc.

AL URBAN

To sump up, a short cut of the AL URBAN story (in this site) with his better known song, «Lookin’ For Money» (Sarg 148, from Spring 1956) – down to earth fast hillbilly bop, lot of echo.

Sources : mainly YouTube and 45cat (for label scans) ; Pee Wee King from my personal library ; C. Klop Dixie serie (Dixie 3333) ; various compilations (issued during the late ’90s.).

Made on a Mac!

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Late January 2016 fortnight’s favorites

This fortnight begins with a heck of wildness: MICHAEL RAYE & Judy Shaye (“two voices and four hands” on the label) do offer the storming “Rockin’ Jamboree” on Arcade (Philly) # 112. Boogie woogie pano, trombone and guitar combine for this from 1953.

Rockin’ jamboree

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sandy foster - locked JOHNNY FOSTER (announced a month ago) from Alabama offers the perfect rock-a-ballad “Locked away from your heart” on the Sandy label (# 1028). Good steel and sincere vocal. 1958. He had an earlier issue (# 1014) on the same label, which sounds promising (alas untraced): “It’s a hard life/You gotta be good“. I don’t know if he’s the same artist who appeared later on Capa and Carma during the early ’60s. Anyone can confirm, or deny?

Locked away from your heart

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Cope McDaniel and the Cimarron Valley Boys are backing EDDE LEE for a fine melodic ballad, “I can’t believe you mean it” on Indianapolis Sunset label # F70W-2603 (1955).

I can’t believe you mean it

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Sunset lee believe

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Ain’t got a nickel

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Little Tom

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waterfall 502 max lowe - ain't got a nickel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAX LOWE enters for two issues, both came out from Morristown, TN. First “Ain’t got a nickel, ain’t got a dime”, a banjo led bluesy ballad, is to be found on Waterfall 502. More of the same on J-F-K-L 701 and “Little Lou”, from 1961 (thanx to Youtube Cheesebrew Wax Archive chain).

Ozark glenn danceOzark billy glenn cry

 

I left the dance

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I’ll never cry again

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That’s 1960 when BILLY GLENN issued on (California) Ozark label L30W-1236 a lovely mid-paced bopper with “I left the dance” (nice steel). The flipside is an uptempo ballad, “I’ll never cry again”. Curiously for a West coast label, the publishing house is “Mississipi Valley”. Glenn also appeared on Yucca 208 (“Bakersfield town”).

 

 

The “REAVES WHITE COUNTY RAMBLERS” go back to the late ‘20s on Vocalion 5218 for the romping “Ten cent piece”. It’s a fast raw hillbilly, showing prominent fiddle and a strong vocal. Courtesy 53jaybop on Youtube.

Ten cent piece

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vocalion reaves- white- cty- ramblers piece

From Wichita, KS, emanate the Kanwic label on which OWEN McCARTY & His Troubadours cut “Key to my heart” (# 145), an uptempo ballad with nice steel, in 1968. McCarty was to have two other known records: on Show Land (produced by Benny Hess) and Air Cap.

kanwick McCarty - key

Key to my heart

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AL URBAN doesn’t need introduction. He cut the great Hillbilly bopper (1957) “Looking for money” (Sarg 148), and the fabulous twin-sider Rockabilly “Gonna be better times/Won’t tell you her name” (Sarg 158), without forgetting his two issues on Fang 1001 and 1003 (untraced). Here he appears on a “manufactured by Tanner ‘n’ Texas [T.N.T.]” A.P.U. 201, which shows two addresses: Gonzales (hometown to Urban) and San Antonio, TX. His “Run away” is similar to his Sarg sides, with a heavy Starday sound: a piano player sounding like Doc Lewis, a fiddle sounding like Red Hayes. Could it be that this record has actually been recorded in Houston?

al urbanapu arban - run  “Run away

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Luling, Cardwell Cty, Texas: the SARG label (1953-1956)

CHARLIE FITCH

Charles Wesley “Charlie” Fitch was born in Halletstsville, Texas, on October 9, 1918. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1940, serving as a tail gunner on B-17 bombers during World War II, and was a German prisoner of war in 1944-45. He married Bennie Lou Bassett of Luling, TX in September 1945 and they had three daughters and a son. He worked at San Antonio’s Brooks Air Force Base until his honorable discharge in 1950. He then moved to Luling and started the Luling Phonograph & Record Shop, and began Sarg Records in December 1953 with Neal Merritt’s “Korean Love Song.” In 1954 Dave Isbell & The Mission City Playboys featuring Willie Nelson on lead guitar, recorded for the label, and a 12-year old Doug Sahm released “A Real American Joe” in January 1955. Drawing from a talent pool that stretched from Houston to San Antonio and throughout South Texas for more than 35 years, Sarg Records released more than 150 singles in Western swing, country, polka, rockabilly, rock & roll, R & B, and conjunto. Sarg Records’ biggest hit was Cecil Moore’s 1964 instrumental “Diamond Back”. Fitch also served as Caldwell County’s Veterans Services Officer until his death on May 7, 2006.