late September 2012 fortnight’s favourites

Hello, folks! This is the latest batch of Hillbilly bops/rockabillies I’d like to help you discover. Only unknown names, and microscopic record labels!

The exception being a 1951 Mercury recording by PAUL & ROY, the Tennessee Valley Boys. They had 4 sessions for the label, and I chose the moving, bluegrass flavored (even a mandolin) “Spring Of Love” (# 6374). From Texas probably, because “Bluebonnet Pub” appears on the label, on BOB WHITFIELD. He does a nice medium paced Rockabilly, “What Can A Man  Do” on Spotlight 5018. Fine strong lead guitar (echo), an haunting steel. A fine record which grows on you everytime you listen to it.

mercury paul&roy spring

spotlight whifield man

 

 

On the Karl label (# 3022), and from I don’t know where, a cross between hillbilly bop and Rockabilly, with LACY KIRK doing the fast ” This Is Saturday Night“. Strong bass, a short fiddle solo. A good record.

From Louisville, KY. do come JIMMY SETTLE & the Blue Grass Rangers for the next song, “Admitting Defeat” on the Pier-Wats label # 1301. There is nothing pertaining to Bluegrass here, because the song is a nice Hillbilly bop dominated by steel.

On the Tycer label # 1304 we come now to JMMY BANKSTON and the “I Come From Louisiana“. No  concession Rockabilly, with unobstrusive drums and fine guitar.

Finally from around 1960, one of the earliest Nashville label releases (see the story in the site) with DAVE STEWART for “Thinking About You” (# 5006). The song has fiddle and bass, and reminds me somehow of early George Jones on Starday.

 

pier-wats settle defeatkarl kirk saturdaytycer bankston louisiananashville stewart about

A Starday subsidiary label in Music City: the NASHVILLE label (1960-1965) – many Starday custom artists! modern Hillbilly bop

After Lonnie Irving‘s 1960 success with « Pinball Machine » (Starday 486) – staying on the charts for four months, reaching Billboard’s # 13 spot -, Don Pierce realized that a lot of the custom material sent in to Starday had strong commercial potential, so he decided to set up a label that would serve as a cross between the Starday custom serie (which lasted until # 1186) and the main series. Shortly after the success of the success of « Pinball Machine » in the summer of 1961, Pierce founded a subsidiary label, Nashville Records. Just as they had a custom service, artists would generally pay for their own studio sessions. But as was the norm for the his Starday productions, Pierce would usually pay for the pressing, shipping, and promotion. The goal was to establish another successful line of singles that, similar to the rock’n’roll label Dixie, could be shopped around on a local level. (more…)