Early October 2021 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night

by Hardrock Gunter

The veteran HARDROCK GUNTER does provide us his « Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night » (Decca 46300) cut in 1950. A nice bopper, an happy song. Good guitar and vocal.

Next, JOHNNY RECTOR, singer fronting Blackie Crawford and the Western Cherokees, a Houston group, does « If They Ever Get Together » : a bopper – steel, piano and fiddle.

Dub Adams on stage (’40s)

The fine DUB ADAMS with an instrumental « Pocahutas Stomp » on the Dude label (Dude JB 1498) : steel, piano and drums. Western tinged.

From the South now, JOHNNY FOSTER does offer « Turn Me Loose » on Capa 233. A duet, jumping country song, shrill guitar and a good guitar solo.

DAVE BROCKMAN had a disk on Starday Custom, the great « Feel Sorry For Me ». Here he is on the Pea-nut label # 1001 with « My Angel’s Gone to Hell ». Surely a Southern label. He’s been on the Fayette label # 1002 too.

The King of Yodel American Singers, as they call him, KENNY ROBERTS in his finest hour (Coral 64032). Intro by harmonica, a nice bopper, fine lyrics. The song was issued too by Lonesome Willie Evans on London and Little Jimmy Dickens on Columbia.

1929-30 the Godfather of Country music JIMMIE RODGERS did two of his better-known tune, « Mean Mama Blues » (with brass acc.) and « Never No More Blues », (flipside to « Mule Skinner Blues »)both cut by Victor. Both of them were revived by AL RUNYON on the Kentucky label, respectively # 577 and 581. Slow songs, only acc. by guitar. Runyon closely copies here Rodgers.

LARRY GOOD on the Kansas City label R (« Our ») # 517 cut a good Rockabilly with « Pick Up Your Hammer » ; good guitar, the vocal is OK

Finally from Louisiana, the romping « Drunkard’s Two Step » by ROBERT BERTRAND. Steel and accordion backing. Fais DoDo # 1000 (a colloquial word for dance halls)

Sources : many ; YouTube for several(Johnny Foster, Dub Adams) ; the others from my own archives.

early March 2012 fortnight’s favourites

Hello folks. Yes I am back, having moved and from a trip in Prague. Beautiful city, yet no Hillbilly sounds over there! Anyway, let’s go back to our favorites. This time I’ve chosen 5 artists. Let’s begin with an interesting late ’40s/early ’50s one, ZEKE CLEMENTS. I know very little about him, except he had many records on Blazon, Liberty (not the L.A. pop concern), Gold Standard, even in 1960 on his own Janet label. He was a prolific songwriter, and should be noticed “Smoke On The Water” for Red Foley. Here he delivers a fine shuffling (piano and guitar led) ditty on Liberty 8, “Oklahoma Blues“.

zeke clementsliberty  clements oklahoma

Early 60s and on to Cincinnati area with the rather unknown SLIM FOSTER. I posted both sides of his K-Ark single (# 613), one side uptempo, the other medium, with a lovely steel-guitar for “Never Be Untrue” and “I Wish I’d known“. Good Country bop.

k-ark foster  untrue

From Texas I’d assume comes now CURLEY SANDERS and a nice bopper on the Imperial label (# 8226), “Too Much Lovin’“, complete with piano, fiddle and guitar and that immediately recognizable Imperial sound. Sanders would later (1956) have a Starday issue, “Brand New Rock And Roll” in the famous custom serie (# 590): see elsewhere in the site for this side.

imperial sanders  lovin'lanor matte parlez-vous

On to Louisana, early ’60s: BILL MATTE & the Five Classics for the presumably hard-to-understand for English speakers: “Parlez-vous l’francais” (Do you speak french) is sung in Cajun patois, and myself have trouble understanding all the lyrics!

Finally another inreresting artist from the Cincinnati area, AL RUNYON, on Kentucky for a revamp of Hank Snow‘s “I’m Moving On“. Not a bad version, as Runyon was covering others’ hits, as his labelmate Delbert Barker. He was also later on Starday for the famous Jimmie Skinner’s penned “Baby Please Come Home“. His story is a bit intricated, but I hope to have it posted in the future.

kentucky runyon  moving As a bonus. I just heard BILLY STRANGE passed away on Feb. 22th (aged 81). He cut many records and played on innumerable sessions from the late ’40s ‘way into the ’70s. Here is one of my favorite trucker songs, “Diesel Smoke, Dangerous Curves” on Capitol 2032 from 1952.

capitol strange diesel

Kentucky records (1952-1955): Cincinnati Hillbilly

kentucky labelBURKHARDT, CARL Carl Burkhardt was the owner of Rite Records in Cincinnati, the parent company for Kentucky, Gateway, Big 4, Big 6, Arc, Deresco, Worthmore, and others.  The operation started as a radio repair shop and record store at 3930 Spring Grove Avenue in the Knowlton’s Corner area of Cincinnati in 1940.  They began pressing records there but eventually moved to the Evendale area, where their building was across Interstate 75 from the GE Plant and could be seen from the highway.  In this location they added a studio, pressing plant, and printing presses, so they could do everything in house.  In 1955 a custom pressing division was opened to manufacture records for anyone who wanted to record and had the money to pay for it.  This continued until 1985, and in that span of time, Rite did custom pressing on approximately 21,000 different singles, most of which were country, bluegrass, or gospel.  During its existence, Rite produced 78 rpms, 45 rpms, and some LPs. (more…)