Early October 2021 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night

by Hardrock Gunter

The veteran HARDROCK GUNTER does provide us his « Boogie Woogie On A Saturday Night » (Decca 46300) cut in 1950. A nice bopper, an happy song. Good guitar and vocal.

Next, JOHNNY RECTOR, singer fronting Blackie Crawford and the Western Cherokees, a Houston group, does « If They Ever Get Together » : a bopper – steel, piano and fiddle.

Dub Adams on stage (’40s)

The fine DUB ADAMS with an instrumental « Pocahutas Stomp » on the Dude label (Dude JB 1498) : steel, piano and drums. Western tinged.

From the South now, JOHNNY FOSTER does offer « Turn Me Loose » on Capa 233. A duet, jumping country song, shrill guitar and a good guitar solo.

DAVE BROCKMAN had a disk on Starday Custom, the great « Feel Sorry For Me ». Here he is on the Pea-nut label # 1001 with « My Angel’s Gone to Hell ». Surely a Southern label. He’s been on the Fayette label # 1002 too.

The King of Yodel American Singers, as they call him, KENNY ROBERTS in his finest hour (Coral 64032). Intro by harmonica, a nice bopper, fine lyrics. The song was issued too by Lonesome Willie Evans on London and Little Jimmy Dickens on Columbia.

1929-30 the Godfather of Country music JIMMIE RODGERS did two of his better-known tune, « Mean Mama Blues » (with brass acc.) and « Never No More Blues », (flipside to « Mule Skinner Blues »)both cut by Victor. Both of them were revived by AL RUNYON on the Kentucky label, respectively # 577 and 581. Slow songs, only acc. by guitar. Runyon closely copies here Rodgers.

LARRY GOOD on the Kansas City label R (« Our ») # 517 cut a good Rockabilly with « Pick Up Your Hammer » ; good guitar, the vocal is OK

Finally from Louisiana, the romping « Drunkard’s Two Step » by ROBERT BERTRAND. Steel and accordion backing. Fais DoDo # 1000 (a colloquial word for dance halls)

Sources : many ; YouTube for several(Johnny Foster, Dub Adams) ; the others from my own archives.

Roy King, yodeler in Detroit and Chicago (1949-51)

photoRoy King is a completely unknown artist from the very early ’50s, who acted in Illinois (Peoria, WWXL), and whom anything is unknown today about. London16031 roy king freight train blues 

London 16031B roy king everybody knewLondon 16049B roy king new tennessee babyLondon16049 roy king mule skinner blues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yodelin’ way up there

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Rambling

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He had a string of releases, probably cut in Detroit, MI, or Chicago, on the London and Mercury labels between 1949 and 1951, and disappeared after this year. He was billed as a yodeler, and eventually yodeled a lot throughout his records, « Yodelin’ way up there » or « Yodelin’ polka ». He was backed by a regional outfit, Hal Fuller’s Tennessee Ho-Downers, usual guitar, bass, fiddle, and steel. Billboard cited him as a promising artist between April and October 1951, although there were no hits. He used to sing old favorites, as Jimmie Rodgers ‘s « Mule skinner blues », Roy Acuff’s « Freight train blues », a fine hillbilly shuffler, “Rambling” or old-timey songs like « St. James infirmary ». His voice is always smooth, a lead guitar is well to the fore, but the whole thing is certainly not hillbilly boogie, although nice yodeling songs. Indeed his style is similar to that of Kenny Roberts.

mercury 6338B yodelin'Mercury6401 roy king st. james infirmary

Any help to document this artist would be welcome!

As usual, Ronald Keppner’s help was indispensable. Thanks Ronald. Also Peter Mohr of Switzerland for the disco and support.
Freight train blues

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Mule skinner blues

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Roy King-Billboard-Aug-51