Early April 2018 bopping and rocking fortnight’s favorites

Howdy, folks ! Hello to returning visitors – welcome to new ones. This is the early April 2018 bopping fortnight’s selection (10 sides ranging from 1947 to 1965).

I would not call a minor artist, such one who released 4 records, and even had his own label. This is the case of TOMMY LITTLE & His Sunrise Rangers. Obviously based in Durham, N.C., he appeared on a N.Y. label Ollit (# 2001) for « Mean Mean Woman » : a 1947 country rocker (heavy drums and bass, plus a mandolin break) ; the flipside « One Time Too Often » is medium, a nice loping guitar. What a good start !

Mean Mean Woman

Tommy Little "Mean Mean Woman"Tommyy Little, "One Time Too Often"

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One Time Too Often

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Tommy Little "I don't mind being blue"Little goes on on his seemingly own label, Tommy’s 1012 with «  I don’t mind being blue » , a fast and happy vocal over an urgent backing..

I Don’t Mind Being Blue

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Finally he appeared on Colonial 116 (subsidiary of Hollywood’s Modern, not the N.C. Label of Johnny Dee) with « High Geared Daddy », a common macho theme of the era. Fast two guitars and vocal. Is this the same song as Webb Pierce‘s ? (see elsewhere in the site for it).Tommy Little "High Geared Daddy"

High Geared Daddy

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Next artist is a real unknown from 1958. Nevertheles his record is much sought after, and it attains $ 600-750 when sold. OTIS WHITE and the Hillrockers out of Vidalia, Ga. has the Rockabilly side (great guitar and slapping bass plus swooping piano) for « Shape Up » on the Gala label # 101. On Gala 102, White this time alone, delivers a very convincing Hillbilly rock (fiddle solo and heavy drums) with « A Losing Game » from 1958/59. The flipside « You been doing me wrong » escaped my researching antennas..

Ois White "Shape Up"Shape UpOtis White "A Losing Game"

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A Losing Game

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Way up North in Michigan on the Bart label (7G 25/26) for a two-sided Rock’n’Roll classic by LAFAYETTE YARBOROUGH No inferior side, both are of the highest standard : « Cool Cool Baby » and « Livin’ Doll » have a solid guitar and a high vocal. The Bart record is sold for $ 800 or 1000 and it deserves them well!

Cool Cool Baby”

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“Livin’ Doll

downloadLafayette Yarborough "Livin' Doll"Lafayette Yarborough "Cool Cool Baby"

 

Finally from 1965 in Tampa, Florida : HEROLD WHITE & His Country Masters for « You’re Not Mine » : a fast wailing vocal and a great embroidering guitar are to be found on the Fuller label # 2522.                      “You’re Not Mine

downloadHerold White "You're not mine"

That’s it folks ! If you found something of interest in those selections, please leave a comment, you’re welcome !

Sources : 45-cat or 78-worlds, YouTube (various contributors, Cheesebrew Wax Archives or HillbillyBoogie1 are my best sources). My own archives.

Late November 2017 bopping fortnight’s favorites (late ’40s to mid-’60s)

MERLE KILGORE is not a newcomer. He met in the ’60s and ’70s a lot of success as a songwriter in Nashville : wrote « Ring of Fire » for Johnny Cash, and « Wolverton mountain » for Claude King. But I am more interested with his beginnings for Imperial records, seemingly all cut at KWKH in Shreveport, La. Here’s « Everybody needs a lttle lovin’ » that Merle released on # 8300. A Rockabilly guitar

 

Merle Kilgore "Everybody needs a little lovin'"

Tillman Franks on double bass with Johnny Horton

 

(fine solo), propelled by a thudding bass (Tillman Franks?) over an urgent vocal. Later Wyatt Merle Kilgore (his actual name, being born in Chickasaw, OK. In 1934) turned frankly towards Rock’n’roll with tunes like « Please please please », cut in New Orleans in Jan. 1956 with an-all Black group, that of Dave Bartholomew, and « Ernie » . So eclectic was the man ! He was also a board member of the Hank Williams Montgomery museum, being very close to Hank’s family. He was back to his Country roots in 1959 with Country rockers on the « D » label (‘Take a trip to the moon »). Died of a lung cancer in 2005.

Everybody needs a little lovin’

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I didn’t find anything on the next artist : TROY JORDAN & His Cross-B-Boys, except to location of the label: Midland, Texas. So can only comment both sides of his disc issued on Tred-Way 100. The A-side is a good uptempo, « Who Flung that mater », with a too-discrete steel-guitar and well-sung, although nothing rxceptional. B-side is really fine bluesy a tune: guitar, steel, a piano solo, lazy vocal for « Don’t cry on my shoulder ». Jordan was a distant cousin of the Carter Sisters, so it may be they are the right way for a research on him.

Who flung that mater

downloadTroy Jordan "Who flung that matter"Troy Jordan "Don't cry on my shoulder"

Don’t cry on my shoulder

download=””>« Texas Millionaire » (Decca 30332, issued 1957) by TABBY WEST is a fast Hillbilly bopper cut in Nashville on January 8, 1956. The voice fits perfectly with the backing instruments, which take the better part of the song : all in all, their solos are beginning at 0’41 et ending at 1’20..West was born in Kingston Springs, TN. and found her way easily to Nashville for a first recording contract in 1954 on Coral Records. There she was paired with Texas Bill Strength (on Coral reords), and backed by the cream of Nashville musicians. I’d like very much to hear « Hillbilly Blues » (Decca 29822) which sounds very promising..

Texas MillionaireTabby West "Texas millionaire"

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There may be more than a handful of « Atomic » labels after WWII. This one emanates from Hollywood, Ca. MEL GRIGGS & His Sons of the Saddle released « Goin’ back to Texas » (# 240) seemingly in the late ’40s – the style is easily reconizable, that of a « Cityzed » Hillbilly, with Western Swing overtones. I don’t know anything on this ensemble, and found it a gentle uptempo ; vocal is firm, and reinforced by the group in unison during the breaks. Griggs persevered with « Watchin’ the clouds roll by » (# 241).

Goin’ back to TexasMel Griggs "Goin' back to Texas"

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HILLBILLY HERMAN, & his Tennessee Valley Boys, despite his name, is a Blugrass artist in 1966, who offers « Today I watched my dreams come true » (Breeze 366, located in Livingston, TN), a solid uptempo, with great backing in the background The main instrument is a very nice mandolin ; alas the guitar solo is very insipid. The Breeze label had issued a very rocking version of “Wreck of the old 97” (# 381) by Jim Sebastian. A record to watch for. In the meantime, do YouTube searching! Herman had an elusive issue on Hatfield (no #)[untraced]

Hillbilly Herman "Today I watched my dream come true"Today I watched my dream come trueHillbilly Herman "I guess I'll always love you"

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Maybe « Hayride boogie » rings a bell for you ? You may remember I had posted the Webb Pierce Story (1949-1950) during the past years ; For contractual reasons (Pierce was still under sontract with 4*), his product was issued under various names, whose this one : TILLMAN FRANKS. Bass player, entrepreneur, band leader, he played a pivotal role in the emergence of the rising « Louisiana Hayride » during the early ’50s. On Pacemaker 1011b, this is a boogie pattern with great guitar by Buddy Attaway [see with the « Artists » search button above for his story]. Indeed there was no place for Tex Grimsley (fiddle) neither Shot Jackson (steel). Pierce re-recorded the song as « Teenage boogie » in 1957, and Franks continued to slap his bass and entertain until the ’80s.

Hayride boogieTillman Franks "Hayride boogie"

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Next artist in discussion will be WHITEY KNIGHT from California, or better say, recording for a Californian label, that of Nielsen. « From an angel to a devil » (# 57/1-2) has steel well to the fore, a relaxed hillbilly bop rhythm : a natural feeling. Not a great disc, but a good one ! Knight had also a rich recording career, appearing on Dot, Sage and Dart.

Whitey Knight "From an angel to a devil"From an angel to a devil”

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FRED NETHERTON gives us a fabulous rocker with his version of Carl Perkins’ « Matchbox » : great swooping and hammering piano, a very fine guitar solo, a terrific vocal on Rural lRhythm 540B. A must have ! “Matchbox

downloadNethertoon Fred "Match box"

Sources : as usual, Internet (45cat, or Youtube) and my own archives. Decca and Imperial data do come from Michel Ruppli’s books. Pictures of Tillman Franks come drom Now Dig This (a 1995 issue).

Buddy Attaway, a Cajun honky-tonk (1947-1954)

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Patrick « Buddy » Attaway was a Cajun musician (fiddle, electric guitar) from Shreveport, Louisiana, born on 5 January 1923. As a teenager he started the Rainbow Boys with songwriter and promoter Tillman Franks (also later bass player) and singer Claude King. After Army service they all left Shreveport to KLEE, Houston, Texas.

When KWKH started the Louisiana Hayride in 1948, they all returned to Shreveport. Attaway backed Claude King on recordings and in 1950 he recorded a duet with Webb Pierce on Pacemaker Records.

Two discs followed on Imperial in 1954. He was a featured Hayride star by that time, and he sang « Big Mamou » there the day Elvis Presley made his debut. He continued as staff guitarist on the Hayride into the ’60s. He died in Shreveport on 15 June 1968.

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The biography above was published in a CD devoted to Ed Camp. It seems too simple and very limited. So I will add the biograhy of early Claude King (courtesy Imperial Anglares), as Buddy Attaway and King went very close during these years.

January 1946 : Claude, Buddy Attaway, Tillman and Merle Clayton went to Dallas to audition for Hal Horton, a dee-jay at KRLD. They ended up back stage at the Sportatorium meeting Roy Acuff. Things in Dallas didn’t work out so they headed back to Shreveport.

 

Both friends quickly joined Harmie Smith, known as the Ozark Mountaineer, on KWKH until 1947. Claude took Webb Pierce’s place and acted as emcee when playing little country towns in North Louisiana, South Arkansas and East Texas. In that band you could find Buddy Attaway (fiddle), who took Owen Perry’s place, also acting as comedian, and Harry Todd (guitar) aged sixteen years too. Harmie and that gang including Tillman Franks (bass) played the State Fair in Shreveport in November 1946.

Bailes Bros. "I want to be loved" Buddy & Claude "Flying saucers" Buddy & Claude  "I want to be loved"

A first record in 1947 was issued on President, in their Southern Series, “Flying Saucers/I Want to be Loved(HB 10) under the name of Buddy & Claude with The Kentuckians. On that tiny label was also The Stamps Quartet. The session was done at KWKH radio in July 1947 with Buddy Attaway, Claude King, Tillman Franks, Shot Jackson and The Bailes Brothers. “I Want To Be Loved” (But Only By You), a Bailes Brothers song issued on Columbia 37341, later reissued 20119, later became a hit for Johnnie and Jack. Both songs are actually duet recordings.

Flying saucers

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I want to be loved

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Bailes Brothers, “I want to be loved

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Soon afterwards, Buddy Attaway and Claude got sponsorship from General Mills Flour and they moved to Monroe, Louisiana, working with Sleepy Watts (bass) and Jackie Featherstone (steel) as The Kentuckians. In early 1948, for a short time, Claude Buddy & Claudeand Buddy went to work in Houston (Tx) calling themselves “The Attaway Boys” on their 30-minute KLEE radio show, and working in Elmer W. Laird’s used cars lot by day. Tillman Franks moved to Houston in April 1948 to work with them for Laird. They lost their jobs and radio sponsor after that guy was stabbed to death around late July 1948.

In December 1950, at KWKH, Claude King with Tillman Franks, Buddy Attaway and Webb Pierce cut “A Million Mistakes” and “Why Should I” issued on Pacemaker HB 1010. The record label was co-owned by Webb Pierce and Horace Logan, the boss/founder of the Louisana Hayride. These sides written by Claude were reissued on Gotham 409 in 1951, and were followed by “51 Beers”/”Beer and Pinball (Gotham 411), two songs from the same session, issued in August 1951.

 At the same session as Claude King’s that saw Pacemaker 1010 and Gotham 411, Webb Pierce recorded an uncredited duet with Buddy Attaway titled Freight Train Blues” (of course the old Roy Acuff song of 1936). When issued on Pacemaker 1006-B, the song didn’t even have a singer’s name on the label, without doubt because Pierce was still contracted to 4 * and Bill McCall. The flip side sung by Buddy Attaway is I’m Sitting on Top Of The World”, and even if credited to Buddy Attaway, that’s an old song, first recorded by The Mississippi Sheiks in 1930. The harmonica chorus is played by Rip Jackson (is there a relation with steel player Shot Jackson ? No one knows) and although Webb changed the words slightly, there is not enough to give him credit.

(Webb Pierce) "Freight train blues"(Webb Pierce & Buddy Attaway) "I'm sitting on top of the world"

“Freight train blues”

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I’m sittin’ on top of the world

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On all these Pacemaker songs recorded at KWKH by night, Webb is backed by Tillman Franks (bass), Buddy Attaway (guitar), Tex Grimsley (fiddle) and Shot Jackson (steel guitar). On all those songs, Buddy Attaway plays great guitar licks in a Jerry Byrd style, and we can only regret his passing at 45 years old on 27th May 1968. His guitar work on Hayride Boogie (a song he co-wrote with Webb) was replicated on the version recorded in 1956 for Decca under the title of Teenage Boogie”. He is also responsible for the great boogie guitar on Pierce’s « California blues » or the Tune Wranglers‘ song « Drifting Texas sand ». These 3 songs were credited to Tillman Franks.

Webb Pierce, “Hayride boogie

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Webb Pierce, “California blues

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Webb Pierce, “Drifting Texas sand

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Franks Tillman (Pierce Webb)  "Drifting Texas Sand" Franks Tillman (Pierce Webb) "California Blues" Franks Tillman (Pierce Webb) "Hayride Boogie"

 

 

 

 

 

Buddy Attaway also recorded for Imperial in January 1954 a cover of Claude King’s Why Should I, issued with Rock-A-My Baby On The Bayou (8258) both fine waltz uptempos. « Why did I leave Cloutchville » is a fast opus, very much in the Cajun tradition, while »Doubtful heart » is a quieter tune (8238). All in all, Attaway had between 1947 and ’54 a consistent high level production, be he soloist or lead player for anyone else.

Why should I

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Rock-a-my baby on the bayou

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Why did I leave Cloutchville

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Doubtful heart

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Attaway Buddy  "Why Should I"

Attaway Buddy "Why Did I Leave Cloutchville"Attaway Buddy "Doubtful Heart"Attaway Buddy "Rock-a-my Baby On The Bayou"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harmie & the Ozark Mountaineers (Buddy Attaway & Claude King)

After the Imperial sides, he never recorded again, concentrating apparently on his work for the Louisiana Hayride, where he was a regular until mid-1957.

March 30th, 1956 leaflet

 

The scheduled issue of a 20-CD on Bear Family in 2017 of Louisiana Hayride tapes should bring some surprises, in this aspect. Attaway will have “Y’all come” (1956) and “In the jailhouse now” (1958) issued.

Warm thanks go to Dominique ‘Imperial’ Anglares and the generous loan of a Claude King early biography : this formed the nucleus of the Buddy Attaway’s one – as both were intimately tied from the beginning. ‘Imperial’ furnished also a good amount of personal pictures..Ole’ Ronald out of Germany as usual furnished rare label scans and music.

HIGH GEARED DADDY

decca 5349 jimmie davisFirst version of the song was cut by JIMMIE DAVIS in February 1937, backed by Milton Brown (actually deceased a year before) Musical Brownies. Out of them Lefty Perkins takes two solos on the steel, Papa Calhoun is at the piano and the fiddle duties are taken by Buck Buchanan. It’s a medium paced blues ditty typical of Davis’ work. It was issued on Decca 5349.
Jimmie Davis, “High geared daddy

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In August 1949 WEBB PIERCE, after having obviously heard Davis’ tune, revived it (taking the credit to him). Nice honky-tonker (Buddy Attaway on steel?)[Shot Jackson is on steel; Buddy Attaway played the lead guitar – note from March 23, 2018]. The lyrics were a bit different from Davis’. Here they are Pierce’s ones:

Come on here girls and hear my song

I’ll tell you my troubles as I step along

I’m a high geared daddy and there’s nothing I won’t do

I’m a two time papa when you leave me at home

I’ll call another momma on the telephone

I’m a high geared daddy that’s never been made blue

If you leave me at home well that’s allright

I’ll take a new momma with me tonight

[continued this style] this perfect example of honky tonk machism was issued on 4 Star 1413, and many times reissued (e.g. 4* 1601), then was the model for other versions.
4* 1413 webb pierceartistic 224-B webb pierce

 

Webb PierceHigh geared daddy

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TOMMY LITTLE & the Sunrise Rangers, from Durham, N.C. recorded the song, although actually it’s a completely different one same time as Pierce’s and Davis’, because it is an old warhorse of the Thirties, frequently known as « Sweet mama put him in low », first recorded by KARL & HARTY (Karl Davis/Hartford Taylor) in Chicago, January 1941 (Okeh 06066). Not surprisingly the song was credited to “Davis”! Fairley Holden had his own version on King 771 in 1947. Tommy Little’s version, first issued on Tommy’s personal label, Tommy’s, was picked up by Colonial, a sub-label to Hollywood giant Modern diskery. Little gives the song a superbly energetic treatment with the mandolin giving it a wonderful old-time flavour.

OK 6066 karl & harty - sweet mama
Karl & HartySweet mama put him in low

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Fairley HoldenSweet mama put him in low

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Tommy LittleHigh geared daddy

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king 771 failey holden - sweet mama put him in low

colonial 116A tommy little

 

 

 

Returning to Webb Pierce’s « HIGH GEARED DADDY‘, the song found a new life in the hands of JIMMY WALKER on the West coast Intro label # 6025 in July 1951. He was backed on this occasion by Joe Maphis and Noel Boggs, augmented by George « Crazy » Tracy on harmonica and did offer an fine, relaxed although energetic version. Finally in a novelty style it was revived as a RCA LP track in 1956 by HOMER & JETHRO.
Jimmy WalkerHigh geared daddy

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Homer & JethroHigh geared daddy

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intro 6025 high-geared daddyjasmine CD Homer & jethro

Jimmy Walker, the “Detour” man – a very underrated hillbilly artist (1945-1965)

Earnest Earl Walker was born in Mason County, West Virginia on December 18th, 1915, a few miles from the river town of Point Pleasant. Having been reared in his home locals and also in the Pittsburgh area, he worked as a riverboat man in the late ’30s before being drafted into the military. (more…)