early May 2015 fortnight’s favorites

First I offer RED LEWIS on Kasko 1643 (Santa Claus, Indiana) for « I’ll move along ». Strong lead guitar and a melodic steel solo. DrunkenHobo, do you know something more about this record?

kasko lewis move
I’ll move along

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Then we’ll turn to a talented artist who deserved much more fame than he’s got during his 2 or 3 years tenure at RCA-Victor Records. Born in 1925, he was noted, after his discharge from U.S. Marine, by A&R man Steve Sholes. So EDDIE MARSHALL cut 9 good singles between 1950 and 1952.
His first, « The Tom Cat blues » (RCA 48-0357), recorded in NYC in May 1950, had Tony Matola on lead guitar, a fiddle, a steel who does a fine job and a bass, and as waited, is a medium-paced bluesy number. An organ comes in the background for good effect.

The Tom Cat blues

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rca marshall tom

eddie marshall pic
In December 1950, he cut the already little classic « Coffee, cigarettes and tears » (21-0413) known by Charlie « Peanut » Faircloth [see a recent Fortnight’s favorites to hear the latter’s version]. His version is jazzy and lot more faster than Faircloth’s. Very nice fiddle.
“”Coffee, cigarettes and tears

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In December 1951, he cut his teeth on Rodney Morris ‘ « Mobilin baby of mine »(20-4661), with sound effects, with a very nasal voice and new : a piano backing. Same tune was revived January 1952 on the West coast for Capitol (#2075) by Gene O’Quin. I include Gene’s version for comparison.
rca marshall mobilin

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Marshall retired from business afterwards to deal with his family.
Gene O’QuinMobilin’ baby of mine

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bb 24-5-52

gene o'quin

Gene O’Quin

Finally from California on the Big State label (# 101), GRADY ROLLINS and the filthy « Spit-toon song », with steel effect and harmonica, as a sequel to « Chew tobacco rag ».

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big state  rollins song
Enjoy the selections ! Some info was taken for Eddie Marshall from Paul Vidal’s BigVJamboree.blogspot site.

late April 2014 fortnight favorites

For this early Spring favorites selection, I’ve chosen mostly – that is unusual – major labels recordings!

The first three on King probably all cut in Cincinnati between 1949 and 1950. The earliest track is by RED PERKINS (born in 1890), who had begun his career before WWII and was later the featured vocalist of PAUL HOWARD  Arkansas Cotton  Pickers (see below). Here it is his “Hoe-Down Boogie” (King 792), a fine call-and-response fast bopper. He also had “Crocodile tears” the next year. His first issue on King (# 773) was “Texas Boogie“, and the personnel was then Jabbo Arrington [gt], Billy Bowman [steel], Bob Moore [bass], Roddy Bristol [fiddle], Fiddlin’ Red Herron [fiddle], Joe Rea [drums], poss. Harold Horner [piano]. The backing is probably similar.

king  perkins hoe-down

king  howard  tonight

Second selection is of course by PAUL HOWARD: “The boogie’s fine tonight“. Fine piano bopper (# 871), and the next is by the famous REDD STEWART, featured vocalist of Pee Wee King‘s Golden West Cowboys. Actually, except accordion (inaudible) the GWC are the backing band of Stewart for this great “Brother drop dead” (# 843). Fine piano, aggressive steel punctuating the beat.

 

paul howard

Paul Howard

Red Perkins, “Hoe-down boogie”

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Paul Howard “The boogie’s fine tonight”

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king  stewart brother capitol  o'quin  specialize

One step away to West coast on the Capitol label for GENE O’QUIN and “I specialize in love” (# 2715). Fast bopper from 1954.
Gene O’Quin “I specialize in love”

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Back to early days. Dallas, Texas, Jim Beck’s studio, April 1951. The MERCER  Brothers (Wallace and Charlie), an old-time male duet do a very energetic “Wish bone” on Columbia 20978. They sound like the Delmore Brothers, and even have WAYNE RANEY on harmonica for a great solo! Thanks to Jack Dumery to have led me to them (and for the CD!)

redd stewart

Redd Stewart

Mercer Brothers “Wish bone”

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Eddie Crosby “Blues stay away from me”

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Danny Dedmon “Hula hula woogie”

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The link with the former is the Delmore and a version of their all-time great “Blues stay away from me“, a cityfied rendition (Cincinnat, August 1949) by EDDIE CROSBY. Nice guitar (could be Zeke Turner).

Finally back in Dallas with DANNY DEDMON, former vocalist of Bill Nettles. Actually his Rhythm Ramblers are Nettles’ Dixie Blues boys. Here he does in 1947 the amusing “Hula hula boogie” on Imperial 8019.

columbia mercer bros. wish decca  crosby  stayimperial dedmon woogie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources: my own collection and the net for artists pictures.

Gene O’Quin, the Hometown Jamboree “Problem child” (1949-1955)

 

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late December 2009 fortnight

Howdy folks! Here we go again with 6 other goodies. 5 are Hillbilly boppers. Gene O’Quin was from Texas, and had numerous sides between 1951 and 1954 on Capitol (he recorded for the most part on West Coast). I’ve chosen his great “You Name It (She’s Got It)” from 1954. Speedy West on agressive steel, Harold Hensley on fiddle. The title says it all! Why not Hank Williams? After all, he was the greatest of all Hillbilly singers. Here is one of my ever favorites, “Honky Tonk Blues”, from 1951. Great lyrics, fine backing from the Drifting Cowboys . A singer who was underrated, then adulated in Rockabilly circles: Charlie Feathers. He came from Mississipi, hanged around Sun Studio in 1955, and recorded marvelous sides, among them “Defrost Your Heart”. Backed by the ideal Memphis Hillbilly team of Quinton Claunch (steel) and Bill Cantrell (fiddle), he delivers a fabulous vocal full of emotion. Next year he was going to sing “Get with it” on Meteor! While in Memphis, a fine Hank Williams-style vocal (even with semi-yodel) is done by Bud Deckleman from Arkansas on the top-charted “Day-Dreamin'” – same backing as Charlie Feathers’. What a strong bass! (see elsewhere in the site for the story on Bud Deckleman). Later on we have Little Jimmy Dickens, a long time Hillbilly artist on Columbia. In 1957, on the West Coast, with a wild steel-guitar player behind him (I think he was Curley Shalker), he offers the next-to-Rock’n’Roll “I Got A Hole in My Pocket”. Enjoy the steering sound! Finally Rocking Blues with Chicago Smokey Smothers’ “I Got My Eyes On You” (mid-60s). Have a good time! Bye.